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APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY / COMMUNITY COUNSELING/ 

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY / ELEMENTARY EDUCATION / 

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY/ SCHOOL COUNSELING/ 

SCHOOL MEDIA SPECIALIST/ SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY/ 

SECONDARY EDUC ATI ON / SPECIAL EDUCATION/ 

TESOL, FOREIGN LANGUAGE, AND BILINGUAL-MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION 



Fairfield University 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Graduate School of 
Education and Allied Professions 



2006-2007 



Information Directory 



Telephone No. 

Fairfield University Switchboard (203) 254-4000 

Athletic Tickets (203) 254-4103 

Bookstore (203)254-4262 

Box Office - Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (203) 254-4010 

Bursar's Office (student accounts) (203) 254-4102 

Career Planning Center (203) 254-4081 

Computing and Network Services Help Desk (StagWeb) (203) 254-4069 

DiMenna-Nyselius Library (203) 254-4044 

Health Center (203) 254-4000, ext. 2241 

Housing (203)254-4215 

Information Desk - John A. Barone Campus Center (203) 254-4222 

Leslie C. Quick Jr. Recreation Complex (203) 254-4140 

Public Safety (campus safety, parking) (203) 254-4090 

Registrar's Office (registration, transcripts) (203) 254-4288 

StagCard (203) 254-4009 

Study Abroad Office (203) 254-4332 



Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions 

Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions 

Fairfield University 

Canisius Hall, Room 102 

1073 North Benson Road 

Fairfield, CT 06824-5195 

Telephone: (203) 254-4250 

Facsimile: (203) 254-4241 

E-mail: graded@mail.fairfield.edu 

Website: www.fairfield.edu 

Applications available from: 

Office of Graduate and Continuing Studies Admission 

Fairfield University 

Canisius Hall, Room 302 

1073 North Benson Road 

Fairfield, CT 06824-51 95 

Telephone: (203) 254-4184 

Facsimile: (203) 254-4073 

E-mail: gradadmis@mail.fairfield.edu 

Website: www.fairfield.edu 

The Fairfield University Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions graduate programs 
catalog is printed annually. However, updates to programs, policies, and courses may be made after 
the catalog has been published. Please contact the dean's office or refer to the University's website. 
www.fairfield.edu, for current information. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

OF 

EDUCATION 

AND 

ALLIED PROFESSIONS 

Master of Arts and Certificate of Advanced Study 



2006-2007 



Table of Contents 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 

Academic Calendar 5 

Message from the Dean 6 

Mission 7 

Overview 8 

Campus Services 8 

Parking 10 

Accreditations 10 

Campus Map Inside Back Cover 

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Academic Advising and Curriculum Planning 1 

Student Programs of Study 1 

Durational Shortage Area Permit (DSAP) Study 1 

Academic Freedom 1 

Academic Honesty 1 

Honor Code 1 

Academic Dishonesty 12 

University Course Numbering System 12 

Normal Academic Progress 

Academic Load 12 

Academic Standards 12 

Auditing 12 

Independent Study 13 

Matriculation/Continuation 13 

Time to Complete Degree 13 

Applications for and Awarding of Degrees 13 

Graduation and Commencement 13 

Comprehensive Examination 13 

Connecticut State Certification 13 

Grading System 

Grades, Academic Average 14 

Transfer of Credit and Waivers 15 

Scholastic Honors 15 

Disruption of Academic Progress 

Academic Probation/Dismissal 15 

Withdrawal 15 

Readmission 15 

Academic Grievance 15 

Transcripts 17 

Student Records 17 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED PROFESSIONS 

Overview 22 

Degree Requirements Overview 23 

Counselor Education Department: Community and School Counseling 

Overview 24 

Program Requirements 24 



Table of Contents 

Course Descriptions 26 

Curriculum and Instruction Department 

Overview 28 

Program Requirements 29 

Course Descriptions 31 

Marriage and Family Therapy Department 

Overview 39 

Program Requirements 39 

Course Descriptions 40 

Psychology and Special Education Department 
Overview 

Psychology 42 

Special Education 50 

Media Technology 55 

Program Requirements 

School Psychology 42 

Applied Psychology 44 

Special Education 50 

Media Technology 56 

Course Descriptions 

Psychology 46 

Special Education 53 

Media Technology 58 

TESOL, Foreign Language, and Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department 

Overview 62 

Program Requirements 62 

Course Descriptions 64 

ADMISSION 

Admission Criteria 18 

Admission Procedure 18 

Compliance Statements and Notifications 67 

TUITION, FEES, AND FINANCIAL AID 

Tuition and Fees 68 

Deferred Payment 68 

Refund of Tuition 68 

Reimbursement by Employer 68 

Assistantships 69 

Scholarships 69 

Federal Stafford Loans 69 

Sallie Mae Signature Student Loan 70 

Tax Deductions 70 

Veterans 70 

ADMINISTRATION 

School Administration and Faculty 71 

Advisory Boards 75 

University Administration 77 

Board of Trustees 78 



Academic Calendar 



Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions 



2006-07 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



Classes are offered on weeknights and Saturdays to accommodate those in the program who are employed full time. 
Refer to the schedules that are distributed each semester for calendar changes. 

Summer 2006 

May 22 - June 6 Summer Pre-Session I 

May 30 Memorial Day - University holiday 

June 7 - June 30 Summer Session I 

July 3 - July 4 Independence Day - University holidays 

July 5 Degree cards due for August graduation 

Fall registration begins 

July 5 - July 29 Summer Session II 

July 31 -Aug. 16 Summer Post-Session 

Fall 2006 

Aug. 22 Back to Campus Day/Open Advisement Day (2-7 p.m.) 

Sept. 5 Orientation for new GSEAP students 

Sept. 6 Classes begin 

Sept. 11 Deadline for make-up of Summer 2006 Incompletes 

Sept. 22 Deadline to register for fall comprehensive exams 

(except Marriage and Family Therapy Program) 

Oct 9 Columbus Day - University holiday 

Oct. 20 Degree cards due for January graduation 

Oct 24 Last day to withdraw without Dean's permission 

Nov. 22 - Nov. 26 Thanksgiving recess 

Nov. 27 Classes resume 

Dec. 1 Spring registration begins 

Dec. 6 Open Advisement Day (2-7 p.m.) 

Dec. 21 Last day of classes for graduate students 

Spring 2007 

Jan. 9 Open Advisement Day (2-7 p.m.) 

Jan. 15 Martin Luther King Jr. Day - University holiday 

Jan. 16 Classes begin 

Jan. 19 Deadline for make-up of Fall 2006 Incompletes 

Feb 2 Deadline to register for spring comprehensive exams 

Feb. 16 Degree cards due for May graduation 

March 12 - March 16 Spring recess 

March 19 Classes resume 

April 2 Summer registration begins 

April 5 - April 8 Easter recess 

May 7 Last day of classes 

May 10 Open Advisement (2-7 p.m.) 

May 20 57th Commencement 

Summer 2007 

May 21 - June 5 Summer Pre-Session 

May 28 Memorial Day - University holiday 

May 30 Deadline for make-up of Spring 2007 Incompletes 

June 6 - June 29 Summer Session I 

July 4 Independence Day - University holiday 

July 5 Degree cards due for August graduation 

July 5 Fall registration begins 

July 5 - July 28 Summer Session II 

July 30 -Aug. 15 Summer Post-Session 



A Message from the Dean 



A Message From the Dean 



On behalf of our staff and faculty, welcome to the Graduate School 
of Education and Allied Professions at Fairfield University. Our 
enduring mission is to provide graduate programs that support 
academic growth, foster professional commitment, and model 
civic engagement. We are proud of our longstanding tradition of 
achievement in teaching, scholarship, and service. Graduates of 
our programs are exceptionally well qualified to make significant 
contributions in fields serving children, youth, families and 
communities. Our faculty members have outstanding expertise, a 
commitment to instructional excellence, and a dedication to meet- 
ing students' academic and professional aspirations. Our programs 
of study are designed to provide the academic foundations and 
credentials you will need to advance in your career. 

This catalog has been designed to serve as a reference guide to academic programs, requirements, and 
resources. It describes the programs that lead to a master of arts degree and a certificate of advanced 
study. Also included are the courses of study that fulfill the requirements for a variety of Connecticut 
professional certificates. The schedule of course offerings for the fall, spring, and summer sessions appear 
in separate publications that are available prior to each registration period. 

The faculty and staff of the Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions join me in wishing you 
every success as you pursue your academic professional goals at Fairfield University. 






Uth 



'mew dy, / runM ta j \ 

Dr. Susan Douglas FranzosaC-/ 
Dean 



Fairfield University Mission 



Fairfield University Mission 



Fairfield University, founded by the Society of Jesus, is a 
coeducational institution of higher learning whose pri- 
mary objectives are to develop the creative intellectual 
potential of its students and to foster in them ethical and 
religious values and a sense of social responsibility. 
Jesuit education, which began in 1547, is committed 
today to the service of faith, of which the promotion of 
justice is an absolute requirement. 

Fairfield is Catholic in both tradition and spirit. It cele- 
brates the God-given dignity of every human person. As 
a Catholic university it welcomes those of all beliefs and 
traditions who share its concerns for scholarship, justice, 
truth, and freedom, and it values the diversity that their 
membership brings to the University community. 

Fairfield educates its students through a variety of schol- 
arly and professional disciplines. All of its schools share 
a liberal and humanistic perspective and a commitment 
to excellence. Fairfield encourages a respect for all the 
disciplines - their similarities, their differences, and their 
interrelationships. In particular, in its undergraduate 
schools it provides all students with a broadly based 
general education curriculum with a special emphasis on 
the traditional humanities as a complement to the more 
specialized preparation in disciplines and professions 
provided by the major programs. Fairfield is also com- 
mitted to the needs of society for liberally educated pro- 
fessionals. It meets the needs of its students to assume 
positions in this society through its undergraduate and 
graduate professional schools and programs. 

A Fairfield education is a liberal education, characterized 
by its breadth and depth. It offers opportunities for indi- 
vidual and common reflection, and it provides training in 
such essential human skills as analysis, synthesis, and 
communication. The liberally educated person is able to 
assimilate and organize facts, to evaluate knowledge, to 
identify issues, to use appropriate methods of reasoning, 
and to convey conclusions persuasively in written and 
spoken word. Equally essential to liberal education is the 
development of the aesthetic dimension of human 
nature, the power to imagine, to intuit, to create, and to 
appreciate. In its fullest sense liberal education initiates 
students at a mature level into their culture, its past, its 
present, and its future. 

Fairfield recognizes that learning is a lifelong process 
and sees the education that it provides as a foundation 
upon which its students may continue to build within 
their chosen areas of scholarly study or professional 
development. It also seeks to foster in its students a con- 
tinuing intellectual curiosity and a desire for self-educa- 
tion that will extend to the broad range of areas to which 
they have been introduced in their studies. 




As a community of scholars, Fairfield gladly joins in the 
broader task of expanding human knowledge and deep- 
ening human understanding, and to this end it encour- 
ages and supports the scholarly research and artistic 
production of its faculty and students. 

Fairfield has a further obligation to the wider community 
of which it is a part, to share with its neighbors its 
resources and its special expertise for the betterment of 
the community as a whole. Faculty and students are 
encouraged to participate in the larger community 
through service and academic activities. But most of all, 
Fairfield serves the wider community by educating its 
students to be socially aware and morally responsible 
persons. 

Fairfield University values each of its students as indi- 
viduals with unique abilities and potentials, and it 
respects the personal and academic freedom of all its 
members. At the same time, it seeks to develop a 
greater sense of community within itself, a sense that all 
of its members belong to and are involved in the 
University, sharing common goals and a common com- 
mitment to truth and justice, and manifesting in their 
lives the common concern for others which is the obli- 
gation of all educated, mature human beings. 



O Fairfield University 

Fairfield University 



A comprehensive liberal arts university built upon the 
450-year-old Jesuit traditions of scholarship and serv- 
ice, Fairfield University is distinguished by sound aca- 
demics, collegiality among faculty and students, and a 
beautiful, 200-acre campus with views of Long Island 
Sound. 

Since its founding in 1942 by the Society of Jesus (the 
Jesuits), the University has grown from an all-male 
school serving 300 to a competitively ranked coeduca- 
tional institution serving 3,300 undergraduate students 
and more than 1 ,000 graduate students, plus non-tradi- 
tional students enrolled in University College. 

In addition to 34 undergraduate majors, Fairfield offers 
full- and part-time graduate programs through its 
College of Arts and Sciences, its Charles F. Dolan 
School of Business, and its schools of Engineering, 
Graduate Education and Allied Professions, and 
Nursing. Graduate students earn credentials for profes- 
sional advancement while benefiting from small class 
sizes, opportunities for real-world application, and the 
resources and reputation of a school consistently 
ranked among the top regional universities in the North 
by U.S. News & World Report. 

In the past decade, more than two dozen Fairfield stu- 
dents have been named Fulbright scholars, and the 
University is among the 1 2 percent of four-year colleges 
and universities with membership in Phi Beta Kappa, 
the nation's oldest and most prestigious academic 
honor society. 

Undergraduate students represent 35 states and more 
than 30 countries. 

Fairfield is located one hour north of New York City at 
the center of a dynamic corridor populated by colleges 
and universities, cultural and recreational resources, 
and leading corporate employers. Its recently renovated 
and expanded facilities include the Rudolph F Bannow 
Science Center, the John A. Barone Campus Center, 
and the DiMenna-Nyselius Library. 

The third youngest of the 28 Jesuit universities in the 
United States, Fairfield has emerged as an academic 
leader well positioned to meet the needs of modem stu- 
dents. More than 60 years after its founding, the 
University's mission remains the same: To educate the 
whole person, challenging the intellectual, spiritual, and 
physical potential of all students. 

In the spirit of its Jesuit founders, Fairfield University 
extends to its graduate students myriad resources and 
services designed to foster their intellectual, spiritual, 
and physical development. 



CAMPUS SERVICES 

The DiMenna-Nyselius Library combines the best of 
the traditional academic library with the latest access 
to print and electronic resources. It is the intellectual 
heart of Fairfield's campus and its signature academic 
building. 

Carrels, leisure seating, and research tables provide 
study space for up to 900 individual students, while 
groups meet in team rooms or study areas, or convene 
for conversation in the 24-hour cyber cafe. Other 
resources include a 24-hour, open-access computer lab 
with Macintosh and Intel-based computers; a second 
computer lab featuring Windows-based computers only; 
two dozen multimedia workstations; an electronic class- 
room; a 90-seat multimedia auditorium; an Information 
Technology Center for large and small group training; 
the Center for Academic Excellence; photocopiers, 
microform readers, and printers; and audiovisual hard- 
ware and software. Workstations for the physically dis- 
abled are available throughout the library. 

The library's collection includes more than 330,000 
bound volumes, 1,800 journals and newspapers, 
1 2,000 audiovisual items, and the equivalent of 1 01 .000 
volumes in microform. To borrow library materials, stu- 
dents must present a StagCard at the Circulation Desk. 
Students can search for materials using an integrated 
library system and online catalog. Library resources 
may also be accessed from any desktop on or off cam- 
pus at http://www.fairfield.edu/library.html. From this 
site, students use their StagCard number and a pin 
code to access their accounts, read full-text journal arti- 
cles from more than 100 databases, submit interlibrary 
loan forms electronically, or contact a reference librari- 
an around the clock via e-mail or "live" chat. 

During the academic year, the library is open Monday 
through Thursday, 7:45 a.m. to midnight; Friday, 
7:45 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.; Saturday. 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and 
Sunday, 10:30 a.m. to midnight. 

The Rudolph F. Bannow Science Center's 44,000- 
square-foot addition, completed in 2002, houses 
advanced instructional and research facilities that foster 
the development of science learning communities, 
engage students in experiential learning, and invite col- 
laborative faculty and student research in biology, 
chemistry, computer science, mathematics, physics, 
and psychology. The original building underwent com- 
plementary renovations. 

The John A. Barone Campus Center, which was 
extensively renovated in 2001, is the social focal point 
of University activities and offers students a place to 
relax, socialize, or study during the day. Students can 
sip cappuccino at Jazzman's CyberCafe, shop at the 
University bookstore, watch deejays for the campus 
radio station, WVOF-FM 88.5. at work in their new 



Fairfield University 




glass-enclosed studio, or grab meals at one of two din- 
ing facilities. The center is open 24 hours from Sunday 
through Thursday and from 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. on Fridays 
and Saturdays. Call the Campus Center between 9 a.m. 
and 9 p.m. for bookstore and dining hall hours. 

Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J., Center, located on Loyola 
Drive, the Kelley Center houses the offices of 
Undergraduate and Graduate Admission, the Registrar, 
Financial Aid, Marketing, Enrollment Management, 
Stagcard, Student Support Services, New Student 
Programs, as well as the Career Planning Center. 

The Career Planning Center is open to graduate stu- 
dents and offers career information, online job listings, 
and career counseling services. The Center also invites 
leading employers to recruit on campus. Graduate stu- 
dents who wish to leverage their master's degrees in a 
career transition should meet with the director of career 
planning one year before graduation. 

The Campus Ministry team nourishes a faith commu- 
nity on campus, taking seriously its unique role in 
expressing the University's Catholic and Jesuit identity. 
The team, composed of pastoral ministers, laypeople, 
and a council of 18 student leaders, provides counsel- 
ing and spiritual direction, fosters prayer life, conducts 
liturgies and retreats, trains students as lectors and 
Eucharistic ministers, and coordinates interfaith and 
ecumenical events. 

Service learning opportunities give students a chance 
for reflection as they work and live alongside people of 
different backgrounds. Students may apply for immer- 
sion experiences in Ecuador, Nicaragua, Mexico, and 
Haiti, as well as trips closer to home in Kentucky, Maine, 
and Connecticut. Each year, hundreds of students par- 
ticipate in Campus Ministry or community service 
events. 

Campus Ministry is housed in the Rev. Pedro Arrupe, 
S.J., Campus Ministry Center on the lower level of the 
Egan Chapel of St. Ignatius Loyola. Mass is held daily 
in the chapel during the lunch hour, on some week- 
nights, and twice on Sundays. 



Fairfield's Computing Services are state-of-the-art. 
High-speed fiber-optic cable, with transmission capabil- 
ities of 100 megabits per second, connects classrooms, 
residence hall rooms, and faculty and administrative 
offices, providing access to the library collection, e-mail, 
various databases, and other on-campus resources. 

Nineteen computer labs, supported by knowledgeable 
lab assistants and open 14 hours a day for walk-in and 
classroom use, offer hardware and software for the 
Windows and Macintosh environments. All campus 
buildings are connected to the Internet, and all resi- 
dence hall rooms have Internet connections, cable tele- 
vision, and voicemail. Students are issued individual 
accounts in StagWeb, a secure website where they can 
check e-mail, register for courses, review their academ- 
ic and financial records, and stay tuned to campus-wide 
announcements. 

Administrative Computing (SunGard SCT) is 

located in Dolan 110 East and provides support for 
the integrated administrative system, Banner. 
Additionally, Administrative Computing supports 
StagWeb, the campus portal that enables students 
to access their e-mail, grades, calendars, course 
schedules and other types of information that is 
important to the adult learner. Administrative 
Computing's Help Desk is located on the second 
floor of Dolan Commons and can be reached by e- 
mail (helpdesk@mail.fairfield.edu) or by phone 
(203) 254-4357. The hours of operation are Mon., 
Weds., Thurs., and Fri. from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
and on Tuesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Computing and Network Services, located on 
the second floor of Dolan Commons, provides lab 
support, technical advice, classroom technology 
applications, and personal Web page assistance. 
Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The SCT 
Help Desk, located on the second floor of Dolan 
Commons, assists with questions related to 
StagWeb (see above). 

The Department of Public Safety is responsible for the 
safety of people and property on campus. Officers patrol 
campus by bike, foot, and vehicle 24 hours a day, 365 
days a year. The Department of Public Safety is author- 
ized to prevent, investigate, and report violations of 
State or Federal Law and University regulations. In addi- 
tion, officers are trained to provide emergency first aid 
and are supplemental first responders for the Town 
of Fairfield. Public Safety officers also oversee the flow 
of traffic on campus and enforce parking regulations. 
Any student, faculty member, or employee of Fairfield 
University should directly report any potential criminal 
act or other emergency to any officer or representative 
of the Department of Public Safety immediately, by call- 
ing (203) 254-4090 or visiting us in Loyola Hall, Room 2. 

The Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts Arts serves 
as a cultural hub and resource for the University and 
surrounding towns, offering popular and classical music 
programs, dance, theatre, and outreach events for 



10 



Fairfield University 



young audiences. The center consists of the 740-seat 
Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J. Theatre, the smaller Lawrence A. 
Wien Experimental Theatre, and the Thomas J. Walsh 
Art Gallery. Tickets to Quick Center events are available 
to graduate students at a discounted price. For a calen- 
dar of events, visit www.quickcenter.com. 

In addition, various departments schedule exhibitions, 
lectures, and dramatic programs throughout the aca- 
demic year. These events are open to all members of the 
University community and many are free of charge. 



Athletics and Recreation 

In athletics, Fairfield is a Division I member of the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and 
competes in conference championship play as a charter 
member of the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference 
(MAAC). The men's and women's basketball teams play 
at Bridgeport's Arena at Harbor Yard, considered one of 
the top facilities in collegiate basketball. Discounted tick- 
ets for Fairfield Stags games are available to graduate 
students. For tickets or other information, call the athlet- 
ic box office or visit www.fairfieldstags.com. In addition, 
competitions in soccer, lacrosse, and other sports are 
held on campus and are free of charge to graduate stu- 
dents. 

The Leslie C. Quick Jr. Recreation Complex, a multi- 
purpose facility also known as the RecPlex, features a 
25-meter, eight-lane swimming pool; a field house for 
various sports; a whirlpool; saunas in the men's and 
women's locker rooms; and racquetball courts. Other 
amenities are two cardio theatres, a weight room, and 
group fitness courses. The Department of Recreation 
also oversees the outdoor tennis, basketball, and sand 
volleyball courts as well as two temporary, portable ice- 
skating rinks. Graduate students may join the RecPlex 
on a per semester basis by presenting a current 
StagCard. For membership information and hours, call 
the RecPlex office, and paying the appropriate fee. 



Parking on Campus 

All vehicles must be registered with the Department of 
Public Safety and display a current vehicle registra- 
tion sticker. For graduate students, the fee for this is 
included as part of tuition. However, graduate stu- 
dents must register their vehicle. To do so, students 
complete and submit the online registration form 
available on StagWeb (see page 19). Students should 
then bring a copy of the submitted application to 
Public Safety (Loyola Hall, Room 2) with proof of 
enrollment and their state vehicle registration. A pam- 
phlet detailing traffic and parking regulations will be 
provided with your registration sticker. Unauthorized 
vehicles parked in fire lanes, handicapped, or service 
vehicle spaces are subject to both fines and towing. 
Handicapped persons must display an official state 
handicapped permit. 



ACCREDITATION 



Fairfield University is fully accredited by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges, which 
accredits schools and colleges in the six New England 
states. Accreditation by one of the six regional accredit- 
ing associations in the United States indicates that the 
school or college has been carefully evaluated and 
found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified edu- 
cators. 

Additional accreditations include: 

AACSB International - The Association to Advance 
Collegiate Schools of Business 

Charles F Dolan School of Business 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
Electrical Engineering program 
Mechanical Engineering program 
Commission on Accreditation of Marriage and Family 
Therapy Education of the American Association for 
Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) 

Marriage and Family Therapy program 
Connecticut State Department of Higher Education 
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related 
Educational Programs (CACREP) 

Counselor Education programs 
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 
Undergraduate Nursing programs 
Graduate Nursing programs 

Program approvals include: 

Connecticut State Department of Higher Education 

Elementary and Secondary Teacher 
certification programs 

Graduate programs leading to certification 
in specialized areas of education 

School of Nursing programs 
Connecticut State Board of Examiners for Nursing 

Undergraduate Nursing programs 

Graduate Nursing programs 
Nurse Anesthesia Council on Accreditation 

The University holds memberships in: 

AACSB International - The Association to Advance 

Collegiate Schools of Business 
American Association of Colleges for Teacher 

Education 
American Association of Colleges of Nursing 
American Council for Higher Education 
American Council on Education 
ASEE -American Society for Engineering Education 
Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities 
Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities 
Connecticut Association of Colleges and Universities 

for Teacher Education 
Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges 
Connecticut Council for Higher Education 
National Association of Independent Colleges 

and Universities 
National Catholic Educational Association 
New England Business and Economic Association 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



11 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND 
GENERAL REGULATIONS 



Academic Advising and 
Curriculum Planning 

All matriculated students must have a faculty advisor. 
Students will be assigned an advisor at the time they 
are notified of formal, conditional, or reviewed special 
status admission After taking nine hours of graduate 
course work, students may select a different faculty 
advisor. All matriculated and reviewed special status 
students must meet with their advisors during their first 
semester to plan a program of study. We recommend 
that the advisor be consulted each semester about 
course selection. 

Information about state certification requirements may 
be obtained from the certification officer or graduate fac- 
ulty advisors. 



Student Programs of Study 

All programs of study must be planned with an advisor. 
In granting approval, the advisor will consider the stu- 
dent's previous academic record and whether or not the 
prerequisites set forth for the specific program have 
been met. Should a student wish to change his or her 
track or concentration, this request must be made in 
writing on the request for change of major form, which 
is available in the dean's office, and must be approved 
by the present and proposed department chair or pro- 
gram director, and the dean. In changing from a non- 
certification track or program to one that leads to 
Connecticut certification, the Praxis I requirement and 
the minimum undergraduate GPA requirements must be 
met before any change of program or track is 
processed. Coursework fulfilling the requirements of 
one earned graduate degree cannot be used to fulfill the 
credit requirements for an additional graduate degree. 



Durational Shortage Area Permit 
(DSAP) Study 

The Durational Shortage Area Permit (DSAP) program 
of study is designed for those candidates who have 
been offered a DSAP position by a school district. In 
order to be eligible for the DSAP, a candidate must 
be officially admitted to the certification program corre- 
sponding to the DSAP certification and possess the 
written recommendation from the chair or director of 
their certification program. Each program has individual 
coursework requirements that must be met before a 
recommendation can be made. Once a recommenda- 



tion has been secured, the candidate may present a 
DSAP application to the associate dean for signature. 
This application must first be completed by the applicant 
and by the employing district. No DSAP applications will 
be endorsed by the associate dean without a program 
recommendation. It is also expected that DSAP appli- 
cants have passed the appropriate Praxis II or ACTFL 
examination before a DSAP application will be signed. 



Academic Freedom and 
Responsibility 

The statement on academic freedom, as formulated in 
the 1940 Statement of Principles endorsed by the 
AAUP and incorporating the 1970 interpretive com- 
ments, is the policy of Fairfield University. Academic 
freedom and responsibility are here defined as the lib- 
erty and obligation to study, to investigate, to present 
and interpret, and discuss facts and ideas concerning 
all branches and fields of learning. Academic freedom is 
limited only by generally accepted standards of respon- 
sible scholarship and by respect for the Catholic com- 
mitment of the institution as expressed in its mission 
statement, which provides that Fairfield University "wel- 
comes those of all beliefs and traditions who share its 
concerns for scholarship, justice, truth, and freedom, 
and it values the diversity which their membership 
brings to the university community." 



Academic Honesty 

All members of the Fairfield University community share 
responsibility for establishing and maintaining appropri- 
ate standards of academic honesty and integrity. As 
such, faculty members have an obligation to set high 
standards of honesty and integrity through personal 
example and the learning communities they create. It is 
further expected that students will follow these stan- 
dards and encourage others to do so. 



Honor Code 

Fairfield University's primary purpose is the pursuit of 
academic excellence. This is possible only in an atmos- 
phere where discovery and communication of knowl- 
edge are marked by scrupulous, unqualified honesty. 
Therefore, it is expected that all students taking classes 
at the University adhere to the following Honor Code: 

"I understand that any violation of academic integrity 
wounds the entire community and undermines the trust 
upon which the discovery and communication of knowl- 
edge depends. Therefore, as a member of the Fairfield 
University community, I hereby pledge to uphold and 
maintain these standards of academic honesty and 
integrity." 



12 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 




Academic Dishonesty 



Students are sometimes unsure ot what constitutes aca- 
demic dishonesty. In all academic work, students are 
expected to submit materials that are their own and to 
include attribution for any ideas or language that is not 
their own. Examples of dishonest conduct include but 
are not limited to: 

• Cheating, such as copying examination answers from 
materials such as crib notes or another student's 
paper. 

• Collusion, such as working with another person or per- 
sons when independent work is prescribed. 

• Inappropriate use of notes. 

• Falsification or fabrication of an assigned project, data, 
results, or sources. 

• Giving, receiving, offering, or soliciting information in 
examinations. 

• Using previously prepared materials in examinations, 
tests, or quizzes. 

• Destruction or alteration of another student's work. 

• Submitting the same paper or report for assignments 
in more than one course without the prior written per- 
mission of each instructor. 

• Appropriating information, ideas, or the language of 
other people or writers and submitting it as one's own 
to satisfy the requirements of a course - commonly 
known as plagiarism. Plagiarism constitutes theft and 
deceit. Assignments (compositions, term papers, com- 
puter programs, etc.) acquired either in part or in whole 
from commercial sources, publications, students, or 
other sources and submitted as one's own original 
work will be considered plagiarism. 

• Unauthorized recording, sale, or use of lectures and 
other instructional materials. 

In the event of such dishonesty, professors are to award 
a grade of zero for the project, paper, or examination in 
question, and may record an F for the course itself. 
When appropriate, expulsion may be recommended. A 
notation of the event is made in the student's file in the 
academic dean's office. The student will receive a copy. 



University Course Numbering 
System 

Undergraduate 

01-99 Introductory courses 

100-199 Intermediate courses without 

prerequisites 
200-299 Intermediate courses with 

prerequisites 
300-399 Advanced courses, normally limited 

to juniors and seniors, and open to 

graduate students with permission 



Graduate 

400-499 



500-599 



Graduate courses, open to 
undergraduate students with 
permission 
Graduate courses 



Normal Academic Progress 

Academic Load 

A full-time student will normally carry nine credits during 
the fall or spring semester. Twelve credits is the maxi- 
mum load permitted. During summer sessions, full-time 
students are permitted to carry a maximum load of 12 
credits. Students who work full-time or attend another 
school may not be full-time students. Such individuals 
are ordinarily limited to six credits during the fall or 
spring semesters and nine credits during the summer 
sessions. 

Academic Standards 

Students are required to maintain satisfactory academ- 
ic standards of scholastic performance. Candidates for 
a master's degree or certificate must maintain a 3.00 
grade point average. Because of the clinical nature of 
many of the graduate programs, department faculty 
members also require demonstration of personal and 
dispositional qualities that are conducive to the selected 
professional role. 

Auditing 

A student who wishes to audit a graduate course may 
do so only in consultation with the course instructor. A 
Permission to Audit form, available at the dean's office, 
must be completed and presented at registration during 
the regular registration period. No academic credit is 
awarded and a grade notation of audit (AU) is recorded 
on the official transcript under the appropriate semester. 
The tuition for auditing is one-half of the credit tuition, 
except for those hands-on courses involving the use of 
a computer workstation. In this case, the audit tuition is 
the same as the credit tuition. Conversion from audit to 
credit status will be permitted only before the third class 
and with the permission of the course instructor. 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



13 



Independent Study 

The purpose of independent study at the graduate level 
is to broaden student knowledge in a specific area of 
interest. Students must submit a preliminary proposal 
using the Independent Study Application form, which is 
available in the dean's office, to the major advisor. 
Frequent consultation with the major advisor is 
required. Students may earn from one to six credits for 
an independent study course. 

Matriculation/Continuation 

In the first 12 semester hours, the student must com- 
plete at least one course from the intended area of con- 
centration and a philosophical foundations course if 
required. To remain in good academic standing, a stu- 
dent must achieve a 3.00 cumulative grade point aver- 
age upon completion of the first 12 semester hours. A 
student whose cumulative grade point average falls 
below 3.00 in any semester is placed on academic pro- 
bation for the following semester. Students on academ- 
ic probation must meet with their advisors to program 
adjustments to their course load. If, at the end of the 
probationary semester, the student's overall average is 
again below 3.00, he or she may be dismissed. 

Continuation in a state certification program requires 
performance above the minimum academic level in 
advanced courses and field experiences, and the rec- 
ommendation of the area faculty 

Time to Complete Degree 

Students are to complete all requirements for a degree 
and file an application for graduation within a period of 
six years from the date of enrollment in the first course 
completed for credit toward the degree. Students 
should follow the degree requirements described in the 
general catalog in effect on the date on which they are 
formally admitted to their degree program. If education 
is interrupted, a student must apply for readmission. 
See the "Readmission" section on page 15. Over and 
above the minimum requirements stated in the catalog, 
the dean may require additional evidence of fitness for 
the degree. 

Applications for and Awarding of Degrees 

All students must file an application for the master's 
degree and the certificate of advanced study in the 
dean's office by the published deadline. Graduate stu- 
dents must successfully complete all requirements for 
the degree in order to participate in commencement 
exercises. Refer to the calendar for the degree applica- 
tion deadline. 

Graduation and Commencement 

Diplomas are awarded in January, May, and August 
(see calendar for application deadlines). Students, who 
have been awarded diplomas in the previous August 
and January, and those who have completed all degree 
requirements for May graduation, are invited to partici- 
pate in the May commencement ceremony. Graduate 
students must successfully complete all requirements 
for the degree in order to participate in commencement. 



Comprehensive Examination 

The following designations for grading the written com- 
prehensive examination of work offered for the master's 
degree in the Graduate School of Education and Allied 
Professions are used: 

Pass with Distinction 

Pass 

Fail 

It is strongly recommended that students plan to take 
the comprehensive examination at least one semester 
before they anticipate graduating. 

Applications to take the examination may be submitted 
after the completion of 24 semester hours of class 
work and are available in the dean's office. If the first 
examination is failed, one retake examination is 
permitted. Passing the comprehensive examination is a 
requirement for all programs leading to the master of 
arts degree except for those in the Curriculum and 
Instruction Department; the TESOL, Foreign Language, 
and Bilingual Education Department; or the School 
Psychology program, in which candidates may elect to 
take the comprehensive examination or complete a 
master's thesis. 



Connecticut State Certification 

Initial certification of any type by the Connecticut 
Department of Education requires institutional approval 
as to scholarship, professional preparation, qualities of 
character, and personal fitness for teaching. Application 
forms for Connecticut certification can be downloaded 
directly from the Connecticut State Department of 
Education website (www.state.ct.us/sde/dtl/cert/ 
toccert.htm); student information on the first page of the 
short form application for initial certification should be 
completed before the application is submitted to the 
associate dean for completion of the second page 
(institutional recommendation). No recommendation will 
be issued until at least 15 semester hours have been 
completed at Fairfield University. Endorsement for certi- 
fication depends on fulfillment of the regulations in 
effect at the time of application for state certification. 

Approved certification programs are listed on page 22 
and described in pages 24-66 of this catalog. All 
graduates of these programs who are recommended for 
certification in Connecticut may be qualified for certifi- 
cation in states that are party to the NASTDEC 
Interstate Contract. 



14 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 




Course Grading System 

Grades; Academic Average 

The work of each student is graded on the following 
basis: 



A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C 


Fair 


F 


Failed 


I 


Incomplete 


P 


Pass 


W 


Withdrew without penalty 



A change of an incomplete grade follows the estab- 
lished policy. 

A student who elects to withdraw from a course must 
obtain written approval from the dean. Refunds will not 
be granted without written notice. The amount of tuition 
refund will be based upon the date the notice is 
received. Fees are not refundable unless a course is 
canceled. 

Each grade has a numerical value as follows: 



The symbol + suffixed to the grades of B and C indi- 
cates the upper ranges covered by those grades. The 
symbol - suffixed to the grades A, B, and C indicates the 
lower ranges covered by those grades. 

The grade of incomplete is given at the discretion of 
individual professors. All coursework must be complet- 
ed within 30 days after the last class in the course for 
which a student has received an incomplete grade, after 
which the "I" becomes an F. Pass or Fail grades are 
used in a limited number of courses. 

No change of grade will be processed after a student 
has graduated. Any request for the change of an earned 
letter grade is at the discretion of the original teacher of 
the course and must be recommended in writing to the 
dean by the professor of record within one calendar 
year of the final class of the course or before gradua- 
tion, whichever comes first. 

A student may request an extension of the one-year 
deadline from the dean of their school if he or she can 
provide documentation that extenuating circumstances 
warrant an extension of the one-year deadline. Such an 
extension may be approved only if the professor of 
record agrees to the extension and an explicit date is 
stipulated by which the additional work must be submit- 
ted. 



A 


4.00 


A- 


3.67 


B+ 


3.33 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.67 


C+ 


2.33 


C 


2.00 


C- 


1.67 


D 


1.00 


F 


0.00 



Multiplying a grade's numerical value by the credit value 
of a course produces the number of quality points 
earned by a student. The student's grade point average 
is computed by dividing the number of quality points 
earned by the total number of credits completed, includ- 
ing failed courses. The average is rounded to the near- 
est second decimal place. 

Incomplete 

An incomplete grade is issued in the rare case when, 
due to an emergency, a student makes arrangements - 
in advance and with the professor's and the dean's per- 
mission - to complete some of the course requirements 
after the semester ends. All course work must be com- 
pleted within 30 days of the end of the term. Any incom- 
plete grade still outstanding after the 30-day extension 
will become an F and the student may be excluded from 
the program. 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



15 



Transfer of Credit and Course Waiver 

Requests for transfer of graduate credit or course waiv- 
er must be recommended by the faculty advisor or 
department chair and approved by the dean or associ- 
ate dean. Transfer of credit from another regionally 
accredited institution of higher learning will be allowed if 
it was applicable to a graduate degree at the institution 
at which it was earned; not used toward another gradu- 
ate degree; and completed prior to enrolling at Fairfield 
University. If this transfer of credit is to be applied 
toward the C.A.S., only graduate work done after com- 
pletion of a master's degree and before enrolling at 
Fairfield will be considered. Such work shall have been 
completed within a period of five years prior to enroll- 
ment, and the grade received for the work may not be 
less than B. As many as six credits may be transferred 
if they relate to the student's present program. Upper- 
division undergraduate courses and graduate courses 
with grades of B or better may, at the discretion of the 
faculty advisor, be used for waiving prerequisites or for 
meeting content requirements. A course waiver does 
not reduce the credit requirement of a degree program; 
another approved credit-bearing course must be taken 
to fulfill degree requirements. 

A limited number of courses taken at other institutions of 
higher learning in fields of specialization that are not 
offered at Fairfield University may be accepted after 
enrollment as part of the credit requirements, provided 
the candidate has written approval of the dean or asso- 
ciate dean before registering for such courses. 



Scholastic Honors 

Alpha Sigma Nu 

Alpha Sigma Nu, the national Jesuit honor society, 
serves to reward and encourage scholarship, loyalty, 
and service to the ideals of Jesuit higher education. To 
be nominated for membership, graduate students must 
have scholastic rank in the top 1 5 percent of their class, 
demonstrate a proven concern for others, and manifest 
a true concern and commitment to the values and goals 
of the society. The Fairfield chapter was reactivated in 
1981 and includes outstanding undergraduate and 
graduate students who are encouraged to promote 
service to the University and provide greater under- 
standing of the Jesuit ideals of education. 

Chi Sigma Iota 

Chi Sigma lota is the International Counseling 
Academic and Professional Honor Society. Fairfield 
University's chapter, Gamma Lambda Chi, was founded 
in 1997. Membership requires a minimum GPAof 3.5 in 
graduate study. The chapter provides a forum for stu- 
dents, alumni, faculty, and local professionals who 
together create a community of professionals with a life- 
long commitment to learning about the issues and best 
practices relevant to counseling. 



Disruption of Academic Progress 

Academic Probation/Dismissal 

A student whose overall grade point average falls below 
3.00 in any semester is placed on probation for the fol- 
lowing semester. If the overall grade point average is 
again below 3.00 at the end of that semester, the stu- 
dent may be dropped from the School. Any student who 
receives two course grades below 2.67 or B- may be 
excluded from the program. 

Withdrawal 

Students who wish to withdraw from a 14-15-week 
course before its sixth scheduled class must do so in 
writing or in person at the Registrar's Office. Written 
withdrawals are effective as of the date received or 
postmarked. In-person withdrawals are made in the 
Registrar's Office by completing and submitting a 
Change of Registration form. 

Those who wish to withdraw from a course after the 
sixth scheduled class must submit a written statement 
of their intention to the dean for approval to withdraw 
without academic penalty. Failure to attend class or 
merely giving notice to an instructor does not constitute 
an official withdrawal and may result in a penalty grade 
being recorded for the course. In general, course with- 
drawals are not approved after the sixth scheduled 
class. In extreme cases, exceptions may be approved 
by the dean. 

Readmission 

All students who interrupt their education for more than 
two successive terms must be reinstated. Requests for 
reinstatement may be made by letter to the associate 
dean at least one month prior to enrollment in courses. 
If a student has been inactive for 12 months or longer, it 
will be necessary to submit a new application for read- 
mission to continue in a graduate program. A review of 
past work will determine the terms of readmission. 

Students who receive a master's degree from Fairfield 
University and who want to begin programs leading to a 
certificate of advanced study are required to file a new 
application of admission. 



Academic Grievance Procedures 

Purpose 

Procedures for review of academic grievances protect 
the rights of students, faculty, and the University by pro- 
viding mechanisms for equitable problem solving. 

Types of Grievances 

A grievance is defined as a complaint of unfair treat- 
ment for which a specific remedy is sought. It excludes 
circumstances that may give rise to a complaint for 
which explicit redress is neither called for nor sought, or 
for which other structures within the University serve as 
an agency for resolution. 

Academic grievances relate to procedural appeals or to 



16 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



academic competence appeals, or to issues of aca- 
demic dishonesty. Procedural appeals are defined as 
those seeking a remedy where no issue of the quality of 
the student's work is involved. For example, a student 
might contend that the professor failed to follow previ- 
ously announced mechanisms of evaluation. 

Academic competence appeals are defined as those 
seeking a remedy because the evaluation of the quality 
of a student's work in a course is disputed. Remedies 
would include but not be limited to awarded grade 
changes, permission to take make-up examinations or 
to repeat courses without penalty. 

Academic dishonesty appeals are defined as those 
seeking a remedy because of a dispute over whether 
plagiarism or cheating occurred. Remedies would 
include but not be limited to removal of file letter, 
change of grade, or submitting new or revised work. 

Time Limits 

The procedures defined here must be initiated within 
one semester after the event that is the subject of the 
grievance. 

INFORMAL PROCEDURE 

Step one: The student attempts to resolve any academ- 
ic grievance with the faculty member, department chair, 
or other individual or agency involved. If, following this 
initial attempt at resolution, the student remains con- 
vinced that a grievance exists, she or he advances to 
step two. 

Step two: The student consults the chair, or other indi- 
viduals when appropriate, bringing written documenta- 
tion of the process up to this point. If the student con- 
tinues to assert that a grievance exists after attempted 
reconciliation, he or she advances to step three. 

Step three: The student presents the grievance to the 
dean of the school in which the course was offered, 
bringing to this meeting documentation of steps one and 
two. If the dean's attempts at mediation prove unsuc- 
cessful, the student is informed of the right to initiate for- 
mal review procedures. 

FORMAL PROCEDURE 

Step one: If the student still believes that the grievance 
remains unresolved following informal procedures, she 
or he initiates the formal review procedure by making a 
written request through the dean of the school in which 
the course was offered for a formal hearing in the aca- 
demic vice president's office. Such a request should 
define the grievance and be accompanied by documen- 
tation of completion of the informal process. It should 
also be accompanied by the dean's opinion of the griev- 
ance. 

Step two: The academic vice president determines 
whether the grievance merits further attention. If not, the 
student is so informed. 

If, however, the grievance does merit further attention, 
the academic vice president determines whether it is a 




procedural, 
appeal. 



competence, or academic dishonesty 



• If it relates to a procedural matter, the academic vice 
president selects a dean (other than the dean of the 
involved school) to chair a grievance committee. 

• If it relates to an academic competence matter, the 
academic vice president requests from the dean 
involved the names of two outside experts to serve as 
a consultant panel in determining the merit of the stu- 
dent's grievance. 

• If it relates to academic dishonesty, the academic vice 
president will convene a committee comprised of a 
dean and two faculty from outside the department in 
which the course was offered to review the material 
and the sanctions. 

In addition, in some instances it may be possible for the 
academic vice president to settle the grievance. 

Step three: For procedural appeals, the grievance com- 
mittee takes whatever steps are deemed appropriate to 
render a recommendation for resolving the grievance. 
The committee adheres to due process procedures 
analogous to those in the Faculty Handbook. 

For competence appeals, the academic vice president 
contacts the outside panel members and requests that 
they review the case in relation to its content validity. 

For academic honesty appeals, the academic vice pres- 
ident will request that the committee present a written 
report of their findings relating to the validity of the 
charge and the sanctions. 



Academic Policies and General Regulations 



17 



Step four: The recommendation from either the griev- 
ance committee or the panel is forwarded to the aca- 
demic vice president in written form, accompanied, if 
necessary, by any supporting data that formed the basis 
of the recommendation. 

Step five: The academic vice president renders a final 
and binding judgment, notifying all involved parties. If 
the grievance involves a dispute over a course grade 
given by a faculty member, the academic vice president 
is the only University official empowered to change that 
grade, and then only at the recommendation of the com- 
mittee or panel. 

Structure of the Grievance Committee 

The structure of the Grievance Committee is the same 
as the existing Academic Honesty Committee, as fol- 
lows: 

• Two faculty members are selected from a standing 
panel of eight faculty members elected by the gener- 
al faculty. The faculty member against whom the 
grievance has been directed proposes four names 
from that panel; the student strikes two of those 
names, and the two remaining faculty members serve. 

• Two students are selected from a standing panel of 
eight students elected by the student government. 
The student(s) (grievant(s) propose four names from 
that panel; the faculty strike two of those names; the 
two remaining students serve. 

• In the event that a faculty member or student selected 
through the foregoing process is unable to meet, 
another elected member of the panel serves as an 
alternate. 

• The committee is chaired by a dean (other than the 
dean of the school in which the course was offered) to 
be selected by the academic vice president. The dean 
so selected has no vote except in the event of a tie, 
and is responsible for overseeing the selection of the 
review committee, convening and conducting the 
committee meetings, and preparing the committee's 
report(s) and other appropriate documentation. 

• The election of committee members should take into 
account the possible need for response on 24-hour 
notice (particularly at the time of Commencement), 
and availability should, in such instances, be a prime 
consideration in committee member selection. 

Due Process Procedure 

a. Both the student and the faculty member have the 
right to be present and to be accompanied by a per- 
sonal advisor or counsel throughout the hearing. 

b. Both the student and the faculty member have the 
right to present and to examine and cross-examine 
witnesses. 

c. The administration makes available to the student 
and the faculty member such authority as it may 
possess to require the presence of witnesses. 



d. The hearing committee promptly and forthrightly 
adjudicates the issues. 

e. The full text of the findings and conclusions of the 
hearing committee are made available in identical 
form and at the same time to the student and the 
faculty member. The cost is met by the University. 

f. In the absence of a defect in procedure, recommen- 
dations shall be made to the Academic Vice 
President by the commiHtee as to possible action in 
the case. 

g. At any time should the basis for an informal hearing 
appear, the procedure may become informal in 
nature. 



Transcripts 



Graduate transcript requests should be made in writing 
to the University Registrar's Office in Canisius Hall. 
There is a $4 fee for each copy (faxed transcripts are 
$6). Students should include the program and dates that 
they attended in their requests. In accordance with the 
general practices of colleges and universities, official 
transcripts with the University seal are sent directly by 
the University. Requests should be made one week in 
advance of the date they are needed. Requests are not 
processed during examination and registration periods. 



Student Records 

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
passed by Congress in 1974, legitimate access to stu- 
dent records has been defined. A student at Fairfield 
University, who has not waived that right, may see any 
records that directly pertain to the student. Excluded by 
statute from inspection is the parents' confidential state- 
ment given to the financial aid office and medical 
records supplied by a physician. 

A listing of records maintained, their location, and the 
means of reviewing them is available in the dean's 
office. Information contained in student files is available 
to others using the guidelines below: 

1 . Confirmation of directory information is available to 
recognized organizations and agencies. Such infor- 
mation includes name, date of birth, dates of atten- 
dance, address. 

2. Copies of transcripts will be provided to anyone 
upon written request of the student. Cost of provid- 
ing such information must be assumed by the stu- 
dent. 

3. All other information, excluding medical records, is 
available to staff members of the University on a 
need-to-know basis; prior to the release of addition- 

v al information, a staff member must prove his or her 
- need to know information to the office responsible 
for maintaining the records. 



18 



Admission 



ADMISSION 



Admission Criteria 

Individuals may apply to the Graduate School of 
Education and Allied Professions as formal applicants 
to pursue a master of arts degree, a certificate of 
advanced study, and/or state certification or licensure, 
or as special status students seeking credits for career 
enhancement or personal growth. Applicants for the 
M.A. must hold a bachelor's degree from a regionally 
accredited college or university and give promise of 
meeting the standards set by the School. Applicants 
for the C.A.S. must hold a master's degree from a 
regionally accredited college or university with a 3.00 
cumulative quality point average. In addition, individual 
departments may set specific requirements concerning 
interviews, adequate scores on tests, course waivers, 
computer literacy, and distribution of undergraduate 
courses. 

Dates for admission vary by program. If a person has 
been denied admission to the School twice, his or her 
application will not be considered again. 

Applicants for the School Counseling, School Media 
Specialist, School Psychology, and all teacher prepara- 
tion programs must fulfill the Essential Skills in 
Mathematics, Reading, and Writing requirement 
(PRAXIS I PPST pass or waiver); possess a minimum 
undergraduate cumulative grade point average of 2.67; 
present two recommendations, on the appropriate 
forms, to support their professional potential; interview 
with a faculty panel; and meet other entry requirements 
as determined by the Connecticut State Board of 
Education. 

Required prerequisite coursework for elementary, sec- 
ondary, TESOL, and bilingual education initial educator 
certification programs includes a minimum of 39 gener- 
al education credits with coursework in five or, depend- 
ing on the program and certification regulations, six of 
the following areas: mathematics, English, natural sci- 
ences, social studies, foreign language, and fine arts, 
as well as a survey course in U.S. history. This general 
education coursework is normally completed as part of 
one's undergraduate program. Those with missing pre- 
requisite coursework are expected to complete it before 
student teaching. Admission with prerequisite course 
deficiencies varies with program. Generally, no more 
than six credits of subject area and/or prerequisite 
coursework may be deficient to be formally admitted 
into a certification program. 

Enrollment as a special status student also requires 
prior completion of a bachelor's degree from a regional- 
ly accredited college or university. Students in this sta- 



tus may take a total of six credits in certification pro- 
grams and nine credits in non-certification programs 
before matriculation is required. Under these conditions 
up to nine graduate credits earned as a special status 
student may be applied toward the M.A. or C.A.S. once 
a student is matriculated. 



Admission Procedure 

A. Applicants for a degree, certificate, or state 
certification 

Students seeking formal admission must complete the 
following procedure: 

1 . Submit a completed formal application and supple- 
mental application along with the non-refundable 
application fee to the Office of Graduate and 
Continuing Studies Admission. 

2. Have all official undergraduate and graduate tran- 
scripts sent to the application file in the Office of 
Graduate and Continuing Studies Admission. 

3. Submit two recommendations — one of which will 
be, preferably, from a current employer or supervi- 
sor — on the appropriate forms. 

4. Provide proof of immunization for measles and 
rubella (if born after Dec. 31, 1956). 

5. Participate in an admissions interview, if required. 

6. Consult a faculty advisor or the associate dean 
about course selection. 

If formal admission has not been granted prior to the 
beginning of the semester, the student may register as 
a special status student for one semester pending 
receipt and disposition of application materials. 

B. Special Status Students 

Students not seeking a degree or certificate may enroll 
and earn up to six credits in a certification program or 
nine credits in a non-certification program using the fol- 
lowing procedure: 

1 . Submit a completed special status application, with 
appropriate advisor signature, to the Graduate 
School's Dean's office. 

2. Complete and return a course registration form 
along with tuition and fees. 

Special status students may request permission to 
extend their status beyond six to nine credits. This will 
require the submission of all former academic records 
but will not affect the credit maximum that may be 
applied to a non-certification program if the student 
matriculates at a later date. Beyond six or nine credits, 
depending on the program, special status students 
must apply for admission to the School prior to enrolling 
for additional credits. 



Admission 



19 



C. Non-Degree Students 

Applicants who hold advanced degrees (at least 
master's and/or sixth year) and are interested in taking 
courses for professional and personal continuing edu- 
cation may be admitted as permanent non-degree stu- 
dents. Courses taken under this status may not be con- 
sidered toward fulfillment of degree requirements. 
Students seeking non-degree status admission must 
complete items 1,2,3, and 4 in Section A, above. 



International Students 

International students must provide a certificate of 
finances (evidence of adequate financial resources in 
U.S. dollars) and should apply well in advance of the 
beginning of the term in which they intend to begin 
graduate studies. The applicant must submit certified 
English translations and a course-by-course evaluation 
of all academic records, evaluated by approved cre- 
dential evaluators only. All international students whose 
native language is not English must demonstrate profi- 
ciency in the English language. A minimum TOEFL 
composite score of 550 for the paper test or 213 for the 
computer-based test is required for admission to the 
graduate program. Information about TOEFL may be 
obtained from any U.S. embassy or information office or 
from Educational Testing Service. TOEFL may be 
waived for those international students who have 
earned an undergraduate or graduate degree from a 
regionally accredited U.S. college or university. 



Students with Disabilities 

Fairfield University is committed to providing qualified 
students with disabilities with an equal opportunity to 
access the benefits, rights, and privileges of its servic- 
es, programs, and activities in an accessible setting. 
Furthermore, in compliance with Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, 
and Connecticut laws, the University provides reason- 
able accommodations to qualified students to reduce 
the impact of disabilities on academic functioning or 
upon other major life activities. It is important to note 
that the University will not alter the essential elements 
of its courses or programs. 

If a student with a disability would like to be considered 
for accommodations, he or she must make this request 
in writing and send the supporting documentation to the 
assistant director of student support services. This 
should be done prior to the start of the academic 
semester and is strictly voluntary. However, if a student 
with a disability chooses not to self-identify and provide 
the necessary documentation, accommodations need 
not be provided. All information concerning disabilities 
is confidential and will only be shared with a student's 
permission. Fairfield University uses the guidelines sug- 
gested by CT AHEAD to determine disabilities and rea- 
sonable accommodations. 



Send letters requesting accommodations to: David 
Ryan-Soderlund, assistant director of student support 
services, Fairfield University, 1073 North Benson Road, 
Fairfield, CT 06824-5195. 



Other Requirements 

The StagCard 

All students are required to obtain a StagCard, the 
University's official identification card. With the 
StagCard, graduate students can gain access to the 
University's computer labs, the library, StagPrint, and 
much more. Graduate students can also purchase a 
membership to the Quick Recreational Complex, which 
requires a valid StagCard for entry. 

To obtain a StagCard you will need a valid, government- 
issued photo identification card. Also, proof of course 
registration will quicken the processing of your card, but 
is not required. Please note: returning students can use 
their existing card. 

The StagCard Office is located in the Aloysius P. Kelley, 
S.J., Center. Office hours are: Monday, Wednesday, 
Thursday, and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; 
Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. NOTE: Summer 
hours may vary from those listed in this catalog. 
For more information, you may check the website: 
www.fairfield.edu/stagcard, e-mail the office at 
stagcard@mail.fairfield.edu or call (203) 254-4009. 

Stag Web (http://stagweb.fairfield.edu) 

All graduate students are issued individual accounts for 
StagWeb, a secure website where you can check e- 
mail, register for parking, review your academic and 
financial records including course schedules and unoffi- 
cial transcripts, and stay tuned to campus-wide 
announcements. 

Your new StagWeb account will be available within 24 
hours of registering for classes for the first time. To log 
in you will need your Fairfield ID number (an eight-digit 
number which can be found on your course schedule) 
and your date of birth (in MMDDYY format). For more 
information or for assistance with StagWeb, please 
contact the StagWeb helpdesk at (203) 254-HELP or by 
e-mail at helpdesk@mail.fairfield.edu. 



20 




Graduate School of Education 
and Allied Professions 



22 



Graduate School Overview 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF 
EDUCATION AND ALLIED 
PROFESSIONS 



The Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions 
prepares its students to use their knowledge in school 
settings and, as its name implies, also prepares candi- 
dates for human service professions that support stu- 
dents in their schools, in their families, and in the broader 
community. The School offers master of arts degree and 
certificate of advanced study programs as well as 
Connecticut State Department of Education accredited 
certification programs in 18 endorsement areas. 

Courses of study leading to a master of arts degree and 
to a certificate of advanced study include: 

1. Curriculum and Instruction 

2. Curriculum and Teaching 

3. Elementary Education (M.A. only) 

4. TESOL, Foreign Language, and 
Bilingual/Multicultural Education 

5. Community Counseling 

6. School Counseling 

7. Marriage and Family Therapy (M.A. only) 

8. Applied Psychology (M.A. only) 

9. School Psychology 

10. Special Education 

11. Educational Technology 

12. Computers in Education 



Approved Connecticut State Department of Education 
certification programs include: 



Elementary Education 

Secondary Education in English, mathematics, 

biology, chemistry, physics, general science, French, 

German, Latin, Spanish, and history/social studies 

Special Education 

Bilingual Education 

TESOL 

School Counseling 

School Media Specialist 



8. School Psychology 



Mission 

The Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions 
advances the mission of Fairfield University through the 
education and training of professionals who teach, coun- 
sel, and serve the wider community. All of our various 
courses of study share a commitment to empower and 
ennoble the whole person through recognition of the 
Jesuit values of social responsibility and the affirmation of 
diversity. 




Together, the departments of the School encompass a 
variety of perspectives that include preparing educators, 
psychologists, and allied mental health professionals 
who: 

• Believe in the inherent worth and dignity of each person 

• Promote the well-being of individuals, couples, families, 
and communities 

• Commit to serve a diverse society 

• Understand human behavior at individual, organization- 
al, and community levels 

• Understand the impact of information technologies on 
the individual, the family, the community, the nation, and 
the world 

• Uphold the highest standards of professional conduct 

The School strives for excellence in education, not only 
seeking knowledge for its own sake, but also the applica- 
tion of that knowledge to the betterment of all. The over- 
arching goal of the School is to promote and support in 
our graduate students the professional attributes of intel- 
lectual rigor, personal integrity, collaboration, informed 
decision-making, self-reflection, and social responsibility 
in their commitment to those whom they serve. 



Graduate School Overview 



23 



Dispostion Statement 



All prospective and admitted students to the Graduate 
School of Education and Allied Professions are expected 
to demonstrate the personal and professional dispositions 
that are: 

• embodied in the mission statement of the GSEAP; 

• outlined in the ethical codes of their chosen profession; 
and 

• stipulated by their particular graduate departments. 

Education, psychology, and mental health professionals 
must be held to the highest standards as they prepare to 
serve the public in important ways. Students who exhibit 
attitudes, beliefs, values, or behavior not consistent with 
these dispositions, or who do not demonstrate the poten- 
tial to do so, may be: 

• denied admission to the program; 

• required to participate successfully with academic 
remediation; 

• required to demonstrate emotional and behavioral inter- 
vention prior to a decision allowing them to continue 
their studies; or 

• dismissed from the program. 

The School 

Since its first graduation in 1951, the Graduate School of 
Education and Allied Professions has awarded 8,341 
master's degrees and 2,262 certificates of advanced 
study (as of August 2005). The current structure of the 
School consists of five departments that house 17 distinct 
programs of study. Eight of those programs are accredit- 
ed by the Connecticut State Department of Education for 
the issuance of certificates to practice those professions. 
In addition to the accreditation of state certification pro- 
grams, the departments of Marriage and Family Therapy 
and Counselor Education are nationally accredited by 
their professional organizations. The School has earned 
the reputation of being a model of excellence and innova- 
tion within its various professional communities. By 
engaging in continual internal program assessment, the 
School is able to create and maintain curricular offerings 
and clinical field experiences that keep the GSEAP on the 
leading edge of all of our disciplines. 



Degree Requirements Overview 

Master of Arts 

1 . Candidates must complete a minimum of 33 credits or 
the number of credits specified by the department. 

2. Candidates must complete the number of credits in 
their major field and approved electives as specified 
by the department. 

3. Candidates will be required to pass a written compre- 
hensive examination in the work offered for the 
degree. To be eligible to sit for the examination, 
students must complete the minimum number of 
semester hours of coursework as determined by their 
department. We recommend that students take the 
comprehensive examination at least one semester 
prior to their anticipated semester of graduation. If the 
first examination is failed, one retake of the examina- 
tion is permitted. Candidates in the Curriculum and 
Instruction Department; TESOL, Foreign Language, 
and Bilingual Education Department; or School 
Psychology program may opt to complete a master's 
thesis instead of the comprehensive examination. 

4. Candidates must have a minimum grade point aver- 
age of 3.00 in order to be eligible to graduate. 

5. Candidates must submit an Application for Degree 
(available in the dean's office) by the scheduled 
deadline. 

All students must register with the dean's office for the 
comprehensive examination. Refer to the graduate 
school calendar for the registration deadline. 



Certificate of Advanced Study 

(Please note that admission to the Certificate of 
Advanced Study in some programs has been suspend- 
ed for this academic year while the curricula undergo 
review.) 

1 . Candidates must complete a minimum of 30 credits 
in an approved program of advanced study. 
Students whose previous program of study was in a 
field other than that selected for the sixth year of 
study will be required to complete certain introduc- 
tory graduate courses before being accepted for 
advanced study. 

2. Candidates must complete 15 credits in the major 
field and all other courses required by the depart- 
ment. 

3. Candidates must have a minimum overall grade 
point average of 3.00. Any grade below a B- will not 
be credited toward a certificate of advanced study. 

4. Candidates must submit an Application for Degree 
(available in the dean's office) by the scheduled 
deadline. 



Counselor Education 



24 

Graduate Programs 



COUNSELOR 
EDUCATION 



In addition to the basic admission application, students 
are required to complete an application supplement. 
Candidates are notified regarding an interview after a 
paper review of their credentials. Passing or waiving 
Praxis I testing is required before formal admission to 
the School Counseling program. School counseling stu- 
dents can take a maximum of six credits before formal 
admission; community counseling students can take a 
maximum of nine credits before formal admission. 



Faculty 



Virginia A. Kelly (chair) 

Michele Friedman 

Bogusia Molina 

Tracey Robertx 

Richard Madwid (clinical coordinator) 



The Counselor Education Department currently offers 
the master of arts degree in community counseling and 
school counseling. The certificate of advanced study, 
which has been offered in the past, is currently under 
reviewed and the department will not be admitting stu- 
dents to the CAS program this academic year. The 
community counseling concentration prepares students 
to work in a variety of human service settings, including 
community counseling centers, career centers, sub- 
stance abuse centers, crisis counseling centers, and 
other community agencies offering counseling services. 
The school counseling concentration prepares students 
to work as counselors in elementary, middle, and sec- 
ondary schools. Students are endorsed for certification 
and/or job placement only in their area of concentration. 

The Community and School Counseling M.A. programs 
are accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of 
Counseling and Related Educational Programs, a spe- 
cialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on 
Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation. In addi- 
tion, the M.A. degree fulfills some of the requirements 
for licensure as a licensed professional counselor with- 
in the state of Connecticut. 

In view of the responsibilities and role of the counselor 
in school and community settings, students whose work 
is of marginal quality in pertinent courses or who 
demonstrate personal qualities that are not conducive 
to the role of counselor will not be recommended for 
matriculation or continuation in the department. In addi- 
tion, the disposition statement presented on page 23 is 
applicable to these programs as it is to all programs in 
the Graduate School of Education and Allied 
Professions. 



Admission to the Department 

Admission decisions are made twice yearly. The 
deadlines for submission of application materials are 
March 1 for summer and fall admission and Nov. 1 for 
spring admission. 



Requirements for the M.A. 

Counselor education students in both concentrations 
must complete a minimum of 48 credits for the M.A. 
degree and are expected to maintain an overall grade 
point average of 3.00. State certification as a school 
counselor may be accomplished as part of the M.A. 
program of study. 



Requirements for the C.A.S. 

The C.A.S. degrees in Counselor Education are cur- 
rently under review. Those interested in learning more 
about this degree program should contact the 
Department Chairperson. 



School Counselor Certification 

Students who have no prior teaching experience but 
wish to be certified in Connecticut as school counselors 
may do so by completing a full-time, yearlong academ- 
ic internship in a public school setting prior to comple- 
tion of the M.A. degree. 



Preparation for Connecticut State 
Licensure and National Counselor 
Certification 

Students who graduate from the Counselor Education 
master's degree programs will have completed the 
requirements to sit for the national certification exam 
and some of the requirements to become a licensed 
professional counselor within the state of Connecticut. 
Individuals wishing to complete these requirements will 
need an additional nine to 12 credits of graduate study 
within the field. The department offers the national cer- 
tification exam; passing this exam results in national 
counselor certification. In addition, this exam serves as 
the counselor licensing examination in Connecticut. 
Students who complete the additional coursework 
requirements and pass the exam will be required to 
obtain 3.000 supervised clinical hours and 100 hours of 
supervision under a qualified mental health practitioner 
prior to applying for state licensure. 



Counselor Education 



25 



Students graduating with a C.A.S. degree are not cov- 
ered under these guidelines and need to obtain nation- 
al certification and state licensure on an individual basis 
according to guidelines outlined by the National Board 
of Certified Counselors and Connecticut Department of 
Public Health. The Counselor Education Department is 
an approved National Board for Certified Counselors 
continuing education units provider. 



Programs of Study - M.A. 

Community Counseling 

(minimum of 48 credits) 

Social and Cultural Foundations (three credits) 
CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

Human Development (six credits) 

CN 447 Lifespan Human Development 

PY 437 Psychopathology and Classification II 

Professional Orientation (three credits) 
CN 468 Professional Issues in Counseling 

Helping Relationship (nine credits) 
CN 500 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy 
CN 553 Counseling Relationships and Skills 
FT 550 Introduction to Marriage and Family 
Therapy 

Group Work (three credits) 

CN 455 Group Work: Theories and Practice 

Lifestyle and Career Development (three credits) 
CN 457 Career Development: Theory and Practice 

Appraisal (three credits) 

CN 467 Assessment in Counseling 

Research and Evaluation (three credits) 
CN 566 Research Methodology 

Clinical Instruction (six to nine credits)* 

CN 558 Counseling Practicum 

CN 590C Internship: Community Counseling 

Specialized Curriculum (three credits) 
CN 432 Community Counseling: Management, 
Delivery, and Evaluation 

Elective courses (three credits) 

Comprehensive examination, which may be taken 
during the last semester of study or one semester prior. 

'Grades of B or better are required in the sequence of 
clinical coursework. 




School Counseling 

(minimum of 48 credits) 

Social and Cultural Foundations (three credits) 
CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

Human Development (six credits) 

CN 447 Lifespan Human Development 

PY 436 Psychopathology and Classification I 

Professional Orientation (three credits) 
CN 468 Professional Issues in Counseling 

Helping Relationship (six credits) 

CN 500 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy 

CN 553 Counseling Relationships and Skills 

Group Work (three credits) 

CN 455 Group Work: Theories and Practice 

Lifestyle and Career Development (three credits) 
CN 457 Career Development: Theory and Practice 

Appraisal (three credits) 

CN 467 Assessment in Counseling 

Research and Evaluation (three credits) 
CN 566 Research Methodology 

Clinical Instruction (nine to 15 credits)" 

CN 558 Counseling Practicum 

CN 590S Internship: School Counseling 

Specialized Curriculum (nine credits) 
CN 531 School Counseling: Procedures, 

Organization, and Evaluation 
ED 429* Philosophical Foundations of Education 
SE 405* Exceptional Learners in the Mainstream 



Elective courses 

Comprehensive examination, which may be taken 
during the last semester of study or one semester prior. 

* Not required for M.A., but required for school counseling 
certification when the candidate lacks a valid Connecticut 
Educator Certificate. 

"Grades of B or better are required in the sequence of 
clinical coursework. 



26 



Counselor Education 



Course Descriptions 

CN 400 Special Topics in Counseling 

This one-credit weekend course offers students a 
concentrated examination of one counseling issue. 
Topics vary and are described in semester bulletins. 
One credit. 

CN 403 Seminar in Special Topics 

This course explores advanced topics in the field of 
counselor education. Topics vary each term, are deter- 
mined by the counselor education department chair, 
and reflect current trends and themes in the field of 
counseling. Three credits. 

CN 432 Community Counseling: 

Management, Delivery, and Evaluation 

Designed to familiarize students with the workings of 
community-based human service programs, this course 
focuses on organizational structure, agency goals and 
human resources, program development, needs 
assessment, grant writing, consultation roles, and pro- 
gram evaluation. Three credits. 

CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

Students examine issues in counseling individuals and 
families from diverse ethnic, cultural, racial, and 
socioeconomic backgrounds and discuss the social, 
educational, economic, and behavioral factors that 
impact clinical work. The course addresses counseling 
men, women, and couples, and the issues of gender 
role stereotyping and changing sex roles, and inte- 
grates professional contributions from individual coun- 
seling and family therapy literature. Cross-referenced 
as FT 433. Three credits. 

CN 446 Spirituality and Counseling 

An introductory course in the exploration of develop- 
mental models and clinical interventions related to the 
interface of spirituality and counseling. The focus of this 
course is on developing knowledge and practical skills 
in working with spiritual and religious issues in counsel- 
ing. Three credits. 

CN 447 Lifespan Human Development 

This course explores the processes of individual and 
family development from childhood through old age. 
Presenting theoretical perspectives for studying child, 
adult, and family development, the course examines the 
modification of family structures over time and psy- 
chosocial development within family systems and cul- 
tural contexts. Cross-referenced as PY 447 and FT 447. 
Three credits. 

CN 454 Introduction to Counseling Children 
and Adolescents 

This course provides an overview of theories and 
research pertinent to counseling children and adoles- 
cents. Students examine factors that promote and 
hinder healthy human development and receive 
information regarding assessment, counseling process, 
and evaluation process unique to working with children 
and adolescents. The course addresses multicultural 



dynamics and identifies issues relevant to divorce, 
grieving, and coping with crisis. Procedures include 
activities designed to help students conceptualize an 
ecosystemic framework for the counseling process. 
(Prerequisites: CN 447, CN 500 or permission of the 
instructor, CN 553.) Three credits. 

CN 455 Group Work: Theories and Practice 

This laboratory course focuses on group counseling 
theories and tasks in an interpersonal context. Students 
observe the nature of their interactions with others and 
enhance their knowledge about the nature of groups 
and the theories/laws of their development. Formerly 
"Group Process." (Prerequisite: matriculation in a coun- 
selor education program, CN 500, CN 553, or permis- 
sion of the instructor.) Three credits. 

CN 457 Career Development: 
Theories and Practice 

Students examine the psychology of work and theories 
of career development while exploring vocational 
interest tests and the uses of various counseling tech- 
niques. The course emphasizes career counseling and 
guidance throughout life. Three credits. 

CN 465 Introduction to Substance Abuse 
and Addictions 

Students explore basic information about the history 
and current use and abuse of various drugs and alco- 
hol. Topics include addiction, 12-step programs, physio- 
logical effects, FAS, COAs, and family systems, as well 
as culturally relevant prevention, intervention, and treat- 
ment strategies for individuals and families. Cross-ref- 
erenced as FT 465. Three credits. 

CN 466 Substance Abuse Interventions 

This course uses didactic and experiential techniques to 
understand and facilitate interventions with substance 
abusers and their families. Topics include the role of 
motivational counseling and techniques developed by 
the Johnson Institute. (Prerequisite: CN 465 or a basic 
understanding of the addictions field.) Three credits. 

CN 467 Assessment in Counseling 

This course establishes an understanding of principles 
and procedures associated with standardized and non- 
standardized assessment in community and school set- 
tings. Students acquire skills necessary for conducting 
basic assessments and explore principles of diagnosis, 
individual, group, and environmental assessments. The 
course includes an overview of intelligence, attitude, 
interest, motivation, aptitude, achievement, personality, 
adjustment, and development: examines legal, ethical, 
and multicultural concerns: and presents considerations 
unique to individuals with special needs. (Prerequisite: 
CN 553.) Three credits. 

CN 468 Professional Issues in Counseling 

This course provides an orientation to the counseling 
profession, including the history of professional coun- 
seling: professional identity: the social, economic, 
and philosophical bases of the profession; the major 
legal and ethical issues facing the profession; and 
current and future issues and trends in counseling. 
Three credits. 



Counselor Education 



27 



CN 500 Theories of Counseling and 
Psychotherapy 

This course examines philosophical bases for counsel- 
ing theory, ethical and professional issues, and eight to 
nine theories that contribute to the practice of profes- 
sional counseling, including psychoanalytic, humanis- 
tic/existential, cognitive/behavioral, and systemic 
approaches. Three credits. 

CN 531 School Counseling: 

Procedures, Organization, and 
Evaluation 

This course provides students with the information 
necessary to understand the development of effective 
group facilitation skills and knowledge of organizing, 
implementing, and evaluating groups. The course 
addresses theoretical and experiential understanding 
of group dynamics. Formerly "Guidance Programs: 
Procedures, Organization, and Evaluation." Three 
credits. 

CN 533 Advanced Multicultural Counseling 
Strategies and Skills 

This course explores the use of counseling strategies 
and skills that are appropriate and relevant when coun- 
seling clients from various cultural backgrounds. 
Students learn to evaluate and assess the systems of 
individual clients, couples, and/or families, and how 
those systems impact client wellbeing. Students use 
role-playing, the Triad Model, and reflecting teams to 
develop cultural competency in working with clients 
from diverse backgrounds. This course emphasizes cul- 
turally specific counseling approaches. (Prerequisite: 
CN 433.) Three credits. 

CN 553 Counseling Relationships and Skills 

This introductory course equips students with various 
techniques of interpersonal communication and assess- 
ment, and reviews their application in counseling. The 
course emphasizes role-playing with the use of video- 
tape and two-way mirror observation. Formerly 
"Counseling Pre-Practicum." Three credits. 

CN 554 Group Facilitation 

Students explore the dynamics of interpersonal rela- 
tionships in a laboratory setting as participants and 
leaders in a group. The course focuses on identifying 
the structure and leadership of counseling groups and 
analyzing the dynamics that render them therapeutic. 
(Prerequisites: CN 455, CN 553.) Three credits. 

CN 558 Counseling Practicum 

Students develop their individual, group, and consulta- 
tion skills in this course through placement in a coun- 
seling setting, while receiving individual and group 
supervision on campus weekly. Participation requires 
video or audio taping at the practicum site for supervi- 
sion and demonstration of diagnosis and treatment 
planning skills. Additional requirements include 100 
clock hours, including 40 direct service hours. Students 
may repeat this course once for credit. (Prerequisites: 
matriculation in Counselor Education program, permis- 
sion of advisor.) Three credits. 



CN 566 Research Methodology 

This course covers statistical procedures and research 
design for the consumer of human services research, 
with an emphasis on selecting appropriate experimental 
designs, understanding the inferential potential of sta- 
tistical procedures, and evaluating published research. 
Students focus on research in their respective disci- 
plines (school counseling, family therapy, etc.) Three 
credits. 

CN 585 Clinical Supervision 

Intended for post-master's degree practitioners in coun- 
seling, marriage and family therapy, psychology, or 
social work, who are engaged in the practice of clinical 
supervision or preparing to become supervisors, this 
course covers major conceptual approaches to supervi- 
sion, supervision methods, evaluation of supervisees, 
ethical and legal issues, and additional variables 
that affect supervision. The course offers experiential 
components to supplement didactic material. Cross- 
referenced as FT 585. Three credits. 

CN 590C Internship: Community Counseling 

In community counseling setting placements consistent 
with their career goals, student interns receive individ- 
ual supervision. University faculty conduct weekly group 
supervision on campus that includes an emphasis on 
clinical work, prevention, and consultation, as well as 
professional issues related to practice. Internship 
requirements include 600 clock hours, including 240 
direct service hours. Students arrange their own intern- 
ships with the assistance of the coordinator of clinical 
instruction. (Prerequisites: CN 558, permission of advi- 
sor.) Six credits. 

CN 590S Internship: School Counseling 

In elementary, middle, and/or secondary school setting 
placements, student interns receive individual supervi- 
sion. University faculty conduct weekly group supervi- 
sion on campus that includes an emphasis on clinical 
work, prevention, and consultation, as well as profes- 
sional issues related to practice. Internship require- 
ments include 600 clock hours, including 240 direct 
service hours. Students make their own internship 
arrangements with the assistance of the coordinator of 
clinical instruction. (Prerequisites: CN 558, permission 
of advisor.) Six to 12 credits. 

CN 595 Independent Study in Counseling 

Students undertake individual projects in consultation 
with a faculty member, based on proposals submitted 
one semester in advance. Three to six credits. 



28 



Curriculum and Instruction 



CURRICULUM 
AND INSTRUCTION 



Faculty 

Wendy Kohli (chair) 
Marsha Alibrandi 
Sandra Billings 
Patricia Calderwood 
Jennifer Goldberg 
Emily Smith 



Elementary Education 

The Elementary Education program offers an M.A. 
degree with a concentration in elementary education. 
Those seeking the master's degree may concurrently 
apply to the elementary education teacher certification 
track. Both the master's only and master's with certifica- 
tion programs in elementary education are deliberately 
anchored within an understanding that elementary 
educators promote social justice and social responsibili- 
ty as they work with students, families, and local com- 
munities. Admission decisions for formal entry into the 
program are made two times a year. The deadlines for 
submission of application materials are Feb. 1 for sum- 
mer and fall admission, and Oct. 1 for spring admission. 



The programs in the Curriculum and Instruction depart- 
ment focus on elementary and secondary education. 
They give special attention, at all levels, to general 
concerns of the context of education and schooling: 
designing and planning curricula, understanding the 
teaching and learning process; choosing appropriate 
methods of instruction, meeting the needs of all learn- 
ers, developing teacher professionalism, addressing 
multicultural issues in education, and incorporating tech- 
nology into the curriculum. 

Professional development can be pursued through the 
master of arts degree and the certificate of advanced 
study. (While the certificate of advanced study has been 
offered in the past, applications will not be accepted in 
this academic year while the curriculum is under review). 
Planned programs leading to certification in elementary 
education or in teaching academic subjects at the sec- 
ondary school level are offered for individuals preparing 
for the teaching profession. 



Areas of Concentration 

The programs of study for the following concentrations 
in the Curriculum and Instruction Department are: 



Curriculum and Teaching 

The Curriculum and Teaching program offers the M.A. 
degree to non-certified and certified professionals in 
education and allied fields who wish to expand their 
knowledge of curriculum and instruction, and enhance 
their understanding of the teaching-learning process. 
(Please note that we will not be accepting applications 
for the certificate of advanced study in this academic 
year). Decisions for formal admission to the M.A. 
degree program are made three times a year. The 
deadlines for submitting all application materials are: 
May 1 for fall admission, Oct. 1 for spring admission, 
and Feb. 1 for summer admission. 



Secondary Education 

The Secondary Education certification program offers 
two options: a M.A. degree in teaching and foundations 
in conjunction with secondary teacher certification, and 
a secondary certification only program. For those seek- 
ing a M.A. with certification, two additional courses are 
required beyond the certification requirements: ED 499, 
"Introduction to Educational Research" and ED 512, 
"Contemporary Schooling in Society." In addition, 
degree candidates must pass a comprehensive exami- 
nation or complete the master's thesis option. The 
secondary education program is committed to excel- 
lence in education. Through adherence to professional 
standards, the program strives to produce educators 
who are moral, ethical, and committed to social justice 
while serving as role models to students. Admission 
decisions for formal entry to the program are made three 
times per year. Deadlines for submission of all applica- 
tion materials are May 1 for fall admission, Oct. 1 for 
spring admission, and Feb. 1 for summer admission. 



Teaching Certification in Elementary and 
Secondary Education 

Planned programs offering a sequence of courses at the 
master's level that lead to Connecticut state certification 
are available in elementary education (grades K through 
six) and in secondary education (grades seven through 
12) in the academic content areas of history /social stud- 
ies, mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, general 
science, French, German, Latin, Spanish, and English. 

Those wishing to enroll in a certification program must 
be formally admitted to either the Curriculum and 
Teaching or the Elementary Education degree program. 

State regulations also require that students pass the 
PRAXIS I - an entry examination of essential skills in 
reading, writing, and mathematics - or present evidence 
of receiving a waiver of the PRAXIS I based on SAT total 
math and verbal scores of 1000 or better with minimum 
verbal and math subscores of 400, if taken prior to 
April 1, 1995, or of 1100 or better with minimum verbal 



Curriculum and Instruction 



29 



and math subscores of 450, if taken on or after April 1, 
1995. Students must also complete study in general 
education coursework as specified in the regulations 
and the requirements of the appropriate program, includ- 
ing a survey course in U.S. history; earn a subject-area 
major appropriate to the certification or at least 30 cred- 
its approved by the director of secondary certification 
programs in the intended certification subject area (stu- 
dents may be required to take additional courses if their 
subject-area coursework is not appropriate to the intend- 
ed certification); present a minimum undergraduate 
cumulative grade point average of 2.67 and pass the 
required PRAXIS II or ACTFL test(s). Applicants must 
also meet additional requirements that include submis- 
sion of a supplemental application, an essay and at least 
two recommendations as well as participation in an 
admission interview. To be considered an initial certifica- 
tion program completer under Title II, a student must 
have successfully completed all coursework in the 
planned program and student teaching requirements as 
specified by the program, but may not have completed 
the state-mandated Praxis II or ACTFL testing require- 
ments. However, to receive an institutional endorsement 
when applying for initial educator certification from the 
Connecticut Department of Education, a candidate must 
pass the state-mandated assessment(s). Candidates 
must also meet specific performance-based and 
professional expectations and be recommended by the 
program faculty. 

Candidates who have been offered a DSAP position by 
a school district must be officially admitted to the appro- 
priate certification program and be recommended by the 
program to the associate dean before the DSAP appli- 
cation will be signed. DSAP candidates may use one 
year of successful DSAP experience to waive student 
teaching only, with program approval. 

Candidates whose DSAP applications have been signed 
by the associate dean must complete the appropriate 
teaching methods course and two semesters of super- 
vised teaching and directed observation coursework as 
defined by the program and Connecticut State 
Department of Education policy on DSAPs. 

For the secondary certification program, undergraduate 
academic credit for life experience may be accepted 
through University College with the approval of the direc- 
tor of the secondary certification program. 

Information related to the most recent Connecticut 
certification regulations is available from graduate 
faculty advisors or the associate dean. Applications for 
certification can be downloaded directly from the 
Connecticut State Department of Education website at 
www.state.ct.us/sde. 

In view of the teacher's role in the school and communi- 
ty, students whose relevant academic productivity is 
marginal or inadequate, who do not embody a socially 
responsible professional disposition, or who demon- 
strate unsuitable personal qualities, will not be recom- 
mended for matriculation, continuation in the teacher 



preparation program, student teaching placement, or 
state certification. In addition, the Disposition Statement 
presented on page 23 is applicable to this program as it 
is to all programs in the Graduate School of Education 
and Allied Professions. 



Requirements for the M.A. 

1 . Complete a minimum of 33 credits. 

2. Complete the following required courses: 

a. ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 
NOTE: This is the required philosophy course 
for master's level students. Only by explicit 
exception will a master's candidate be 
permitted to take any other course to fulfill the 
requirement. 

b. ED 441 Teaching and Learning Within 
Multicultural Contexts of Education 

c. ED 499 Introduction to Educational Research. 
(Prerequisite: at least six credits toward 
master's degree.) 

d. ED 512 Contemporary Schooling in Society, 
formerly Contemporary Issues in Education. 
(Prerequisite: at least six credits toward 
master's degree) 

e. MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 

3. Complete a minimum of 18 credits in an area of 
concentration and/or as approved electives. 

4. Complete the comprehensive examination or 
master's thesis option: 

a. Comprehensive examination - Candidates 
selecting this option are required to register to 
take the examination after having completed at 
least 24 credits and all required courses. 
Students may take the comprehensive exam 
concurrently with completion of required 
courses. 

b. Master's thesis - Candidates seeking to pursue 

this option are required to: 
i. Inform their advisor of their decision to 

write a thesis after completing at least 15 

but not more than 30 credits, 
ii. Complete ED 499 prior to selecting the 

thesis option, 
iii. Obtain agreement from their faculty advisor 

or other Curriculum and Instruction 

Department full-time faculty to serve as 

thesis advisor, 
iv. Obtain thesis approval form and 

instructions for preparing the master's 

thesis from the chair of the Curriculum and 

Instruction Department or the dean's office, 
v. Take ED 498 Thesis Seminar after 

completing at least 24 credits, 
vi. Obtain written approval of the thesis by 

the thesis advisor, second reader, and 

department chairperson, 
vii. Submit thesis to dean's office by 

appropriate date for graduation. 



30 



Curriculum and Instruction 



The Certificate of Advanced Study (CAS) program 
will not be accepting applicants this academic year. 
Please contact the Department Chairperson for fur- 
ther information. 



Teaching Certifications 

Elementary Education (Grades K-6) 

ED 405 Contexts of Education in the Primary Grades 

(formerly Education in the Primary Grades) 
ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 
ED 437 Developing Literacy in the Elementary 

School: Primary Grades 
ED 441 Teaching and Learning within Multicultural 

Contexts of Education 
ED 442 Educational Psychology 
ED 447 Learning Mathematics in the Elementary 

Classroom (formerly Teaching Elementary 

School Mathematics) 
ED 522 Learning and the Child's Experience 

(formerly The Developmental Process) 
ED 531 Extending Literacy in the Elementary 

School: Grades 3-6 
ED 545 Developing Integrated Curriculum for 

Elementary Students: Inquiry and Action 

(formerly Science. Health, and Social 

Studies in the Elementary Classroom) 
MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 
SE 405 Exceptional Learners in the Mainstream 

OR 
SE 430 Special Learners in the Regular Classroom 
ED 583 Elementary Student Teaching: Immersion in 

a Community of Practice 
ED 584 Reflective Practice Seminar: Elementary 

Education 

Based on elementary education faculty evaluations, 
teacher candidates may also be required to take PY 446 
Developmental Psychology: Theory and Application in 
Professional Practice. 

Advancement to student teaching is based on evidence 
of competence in specific tasks and fieldwork as well as 
suitable professional and personal dispositions. 
Consequently, at times, teacher candidates may be 
required to satisfactorily complete additional assign- 
ments, including focused fieldwork, before advancing to 
student teaching. 



Secondary Education (Grades 7-12) 

ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 
ED 441 Teaching and Learning within Multicultural 

Contexts of Education 
ED 442 Educational Psychology 
ED 465 Teaching Methods for Secondary School 

(for those students with no teaching 

experience) 

OR 
ED 565 Principles of Curriculum Development and 




Evaluation (with advisor approval, may be 

substituted for those students with full-time 

teaching experience) 
ED 581 Directed Observation and Supervised 

Student Teaching: Secondary Education 
ED 582 Student Teaching Seminar: Secondary 

Education 
MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 
SE 405 Exceptional Learners in the Mainstream 

OR 
SE 430 Special Learners in the Regular Classroom 



English in Secondary Education (Grades 7-12) 

ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 
ED 441 Teaching and Learning within Multicultural 

Contexts of Education 
ED 442 Educational Psychology 
ED 459 Developmental Reading in the Secondary 

School 
ED 466 Special Methods in Secondary School 

English 

OR 
ED 565 Principles of Curriculum Development and 

Evaluation (with advisor approval, may be 

substituted for those students with full-time 

teaching experience) 
ED 581 Directed Observation and Supervised 

Student Teaching: Secondary Education 
ED 582 Student Teaching Seminar: Secondary 

Education 
EN 405 Literature for Young Adults 
EN 411 Teaching Writing in the 3-12 Classroom 
EN 417 Traditional and Structural Grammar 

Education 
MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 
SE 405 Exceptional Learners in the Mainstream 

OR 
SE 430 Special Learners in the Regular Classroom 



Curriculum and Instruction 



31 



Certification in History/Social Studies 

A student majoring in history may earn this certification 
by: 

• Completing a history major, including U.S. history, 
western civilization, and non-western history, and by 
earning a total of 18 credits in a combination of three 
social sciences (politics, economics, and sociology/ 
anthropology). 

A student majoring in political science, economics, or 
sociology may earn this certification by: 

• Completing a major in his/her social studies subject 
area and earning 18 credits in history, including U.S. 
history, western civilization, and non-western history. 

A student majoring in an area other than history or 
social science may earn this certification by: 

• Completing an interdisciplinary major consisting of 39 
semester hours of credit in subjects covered by the 
endorsement, each of which shall include 18 semes- 
ter hours of credit in history, including U.S. history, 
western civilization, and non-western history, provided 
that for the interdisciplinary major, study shall include 
a minimum of one course in each of the following 
areas: political science; economics; geography; soci- 
ology or anthropology; or psychology. 



Elementary Foreign Language Cross-Endorsement 
for Secondary Education Students 

Those who hold or are eligible for Connecticut state cer- 
tification in teaching a foreign language at the second- 
ary level may earn an elementary level cross-endorse- 
ment in that same language by successfully completing 
three semester hours of credit in language acquisition in 
young children and three semester hours of credit in 
methods of teaching foreign language at the elementary 
level. The following Fairfield University courses have 
Connecticut state approval for meeting these certifica- 
tion requirements: 

Language acquisition in young children 

ED 437 Developing Literacy in the Elementary 

School: Primary Grades 
ED 531 Extending Literacy in the Elementary 

School: Grades 3-6 
SL 447 Culture and Second Language Acquisition 

(requires written verification of elementary 

focus in coursework) 

Methods of teaching foreign language at the 
elementary level 

SL 436 Methods and Materials for Second 
Language Teaching (requires written 
verification of elementary focus in 
coursework) 



Course Descriptions 

ED 405 Contexts of Education in the Primary 
Grades 

Based on current theory and practice in multicultural 
education, learning theory, child development, and 
classroom management, this course provides the 
opportunity to learn about and design learning 
environments in which primary grade children thrive, 
build supportive learning communities, and develop 
social conscience. Formerly "Education in the Primary 
Grades." Three credits. 

ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 

Drawing on a range of philosophical perspectives, this 
foundational course provides students with the opportu- 
nity to analyze critically some of the recurring themes in 
educational thought and connect them to the contem- 
porary educational context. Fundamental questions will 
be examined including: the meaning of one's chosen 
vocation; the purposes of education and schooling in 
a democratic society; the ethical dimensions of the 
teaching/learning relationship; and the role of the social 
imagination in transforming the world. Three credits. 

ED 437 Developing Literacy in the Elementary 
School: Primary Grades 

This course explores developmental literacy, with an 
emphasis on the primary grades. Guided by current 
research and practice in literacy, pedagogy, human 
development, and multicultural education, students 
assess and develop children's literacy strategies and 
skills; organize and implement group and individual 
instruction in reading and writing; develop a technolog- 
ically current, literate classroom environment; and 
design curriculum to support literacy development and 
social responsibility. Course requirements include: col- 
laborative work with peers and cooperating teachers, 
an extensive case study, and at least two hours per 
week of fieldwork in a priority school district. Three 
credits. 

ED 441 Teaching and Learning within 

Multicultural Contexts of Education 

This course explores and addresses the multifaceted 
aspects of multicultural education with the aim of 
engaging in a teaching-learning process where stu- 
dents explore their commitment to the well-being and 
learning of all students; develop a deep understanding 
of the needs of all students; develop strategies to 
promote caring, justice, and equity in teaching; learn to 
respect linguistic, racial, ethnic, gender, and cultural 
diversity; investigate how students construct knowl- 
edge; demonstrate an understanding of the relationship 
between students' daily life experiences and education; 
and critique systemic processes of discrimination that 
marginalize and silence various groups of students. 
Cross-referenced as SL 441. Three credits. 

ED 442 Educational Psychology 

Designed to provide an understanding of the psycholo- 
gy of teaching and learning, this course emphasizes 
child and adolescent development, motivation tech- 



32 



Curriculum and Instruction 







niques, teaching and learning theories, strategies for 
working with culturally diverse student populations, stu- 
dent performance monitoring and assessment, and cur- 
rent issues in educational psychology. Especially appro- 
priate for those new to the profession, this course helps 
participants develop insights into student behavior. 
Course requirements include field experience in a cul- 
turally diverse school setting approved by the instructor, 
for a minimum of twenty hours. Three credits. 

ED 443 Integrating Instructional Technologies 
into Elementary School Education 

This course focuses on the applications of a variety of 
instructional technologies, including the Internet, 
spreadsheets, databases, graphics programs, multime- 
dia programs, and audio and video programs to struc- 
ture effective learning environments for elementary edu- 
cation students. Emphasis will also be placed on 
reviewing available teacher resources including lesson 
plans, collaborative projects, and cultural diversity proj- 
ects. (Prerequisite: MD 400 or permission of instructor) 
Cross-referenced as CS 443/MD 443. Lab fee: $45. 
Three credits. 

ED 447 Learning Mathematics in the 
Elementary Classroom 

In accordance with the professional standards for 
teaching mathematics, this course emphasizes the 
important decisions a teacher makes in teaching: set- 
ting goals, selecting or creating a variety of appropriate 
mathematical tasks, supporting classroom discourse; 
integrating mathematics across the curriculum; assess- 
ing student learning; and creating a supportive class- 
room environment. During this course, students explore 
the relevance of theory in the classroom. In addition, 
students investigate the development of specific con- 
cepts such as computation and geometry in elementary 
age children. Students will engage in adult-level math- 
ematics activities designed to increase an understand- 
ing of mathematics, examine the latest research on how 



children learn mathematics, and explore strategies for 
dealing with diverse learners. Additionally, as socially 
responsible educators, students examine how mathe- 
matical practices and teaching methods are influenced 
by underlying theoretical principles linked to history 
and the position of the classroom teacher. Course 
requirements include on-site fieldwork in an elementary 
school for a minimum of two hours per week during the 
semester. Formerly "Teaching Elementary School 
Mathematics." Three credits. 

ED 452 Integrating Technology in Content Areas: 
Language Arts and Social Studies 

This course addresses the infusion of conventional and 
new technologies in teaching language arts and social 
studies curricula. Participants study and assess the 
educational values of innovative teaching strategies 
that employ a broad range of instructional materials and 
resources. Based upon a sound theoretical framework, 
instructional models, and the best practices, partici- 
pants design and create units of instruction and lesson 
activities integrating technology resources, including 
audio, video, computer software, and Web-based 
resources. Participants also participate in online collab- 
orative learning experiences with the purpose of estab- 
lishing an ongoing community of learners for long-term 
collaboration. The course examines legal, ethical, and 
equity issues as they relate to the language arts and 
social studies classroom and discusses concepts of 
universal access to curriculum and universal design to 
help individualize instruction for all learners, particularly 
in the inclusive classroom. Participants create an elec- 
tronic portfolio that can be expanded upon completion 
of the course. Cross-referenced as CD 452/MD 452. 
Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

ED 459 Developmental Reading in the 
Secondary School 

This course emphasizes enhancing reading compre- 
hension in all curricular areas at the secondary level. 
Current reading theory and research provide the frame- 
work for examining a variety of instructional strategies. 
Additional areas explored include questioning tech- 
niques, concept development, study strategies, and 
assessment. Three credits. 

ED 465 Teaching Methods for Secondary School 

This course includes a comprehensive study of the prin- 
ciples, methods, and materials necessary for teaching 
in the middle, junior, and senior high schools. Students 
explore effective elements of instruction as they relate 
to practical applications in the classroom. The course 
addresses teaching specific subject areas through 
readings, subject-area reports, and a unit of work. 
Students practice teaching techniques in videotaped 
mini-teaching sessions. This course requires a field 
service component consisting of 15 hours working with 
a practicing teacher. Guidance on certification issues 
is provided. (Prerequisite: Submission of a resume, a 
one-page philosophy of education writing sample, a 
data form, and permission of the coordinator of the 
graduate secondary education program) Three credits. 



Curriculum and Instruction 



33 



ED 466 Special Methods in Secondary School 
English 

Students explore the organizational pattern in which 
English can best be taught and analyze the effective- 
ness of various methodology in bringing about changes 
in the language usage of young people. The course 
considers such factors as appropriate curriculum mate- 
rials, methods of organization, approaches to literature 
study, and procedures most cogent in the fields of gram- 
mar, composition, oral communication, and dialogue. 
This course requires a field service component consist- 
ing of 15 hours working with a practicing teacher. 
(Prerequisite: Submission of a resume, a one-page 
philosophy of education writing sample, a data form and 
permission of the coordinator of the graduate secondary 
education program.) Three credits. 

ED 467 Teaching and Learning for the Practicing 
Teacher 

This course is designed for secondary certification 
candidates holding a DSAP (Durational Shortage Area 
Permit) with a public school district. Effective elements 
of instruction are explored as they relate to practical 
applications in the classroom. Study of teaching specif- 
ic subject areas and grade levels is addressed through 
class work and readings. This course includes strate- 
gies for the beginning teacher to plan, implement, and 
assess students. Attention is paid to issues such as 
school governance, school and district organizational 
patterns, classroom management, conflict resolution, 
communication with parents, sensitivity to multicultural 
issues, sexual harassment, motivation, gender equity, 
integration of technology, professional organizations, 
and the BEST program. Guest speakers are invited to 
present information on pertinent topics. Problem Based 
Assessment is used to address the needs of the class. 
Communication is established with the candidates' 
mentors and evaluations are provided to the instructor 
by the student from evaluators in the district that is pro- 
viding the DSAP. Students use the Common Core of 
Teaching, the Common Core of Learning and State and 
National Standards in conjunction with their experience. 
Candidates must obtain permission to take this course 
from the Director of Secondary Certification Programs. 
(Prerequisites: formal acceptance into the Teacher 
Preparation program and be a viable DSAP teacher.) 
Three credits. 

ED 493 The Educational Imagination 

This course explores alternative approaches to educa- 
tion. Drawing on the works of liberatory educators, such 
as Paulo Freire and Maxine Greene, as well as the arts 
and popular culture, this course provides the basis for 
dialogue on the transformative power of our imagina- 
tion. This course views the teacher's role as one of 
empowering students to think critically about them- 
selves and their relation to education and a multicultur- 
al society, and the student's role as one of active partic- 
ipation in the learning process. Formerly "Explorations 
in Critical Studies." Three credits. 



ED 497 Supporting Science and Health-based 
Inquiry and Action by Elementary 
Students 

Guided by current research and practice in science and 
health education, pedagogy, human development, and 
multicultural education, students in this course design 
socially responsible, inquiry-oriented science and 
health curricula for the elementary grades that 
develop content knowledge, inquiry tools, technological 
competence, social responsibility, and critical thinking. 
The course requires extensive collaborative work. 
Formerly "Science and Health in the Elementary 
School." Three credits. 

ED 498 Thesis Seminar 

During this seminar for students who have selected the 
thesis option for completing an M.A. degree, partici- 
pants develop research proposals, carry out the 
research, and complete their theses. Three credits. 

ED 499 Introduction to Educational Research 

In this course, students develop critical perspectives on 
research about education. Guided by current theory 
and practice in educational research, students reflect 
on ethical considerations of the researcher as well as 
the methodological tools that are used in educational 
research. Students are introduced to a wide range of 
qualitative and quantitative methods, which they use in 
analyzing data and reviewing current educational 
research articles. Through discussions, students con- 
sider how research can be a valuable tool that helps 
teachers systematically reflect on learning and teaching 
practices. During the course, students connect an area 
of interest with research methods as they develop 
research paper proposals. (Prerequisite: at least six 
credits toward a master's degree) Three credits. 

ED 511 Educating for Social Responsibility 
and Civic Engagement 

Drawing on contemporary educational theory and best 
practices, and inspired by the Jesuit educational goal of 
"forming men and woman for others," this course 
explores the ways that educational professionals can 
promote social responsibility in their work with schools, 
communities, and families. A diverse range of curricular 
approaches, including service learning, community 
service, conflict resolution, and youth civic development 
are examined. The focus is on developing the disposi- 
tions, skills ands competencies needed for young 
people to become engaged in their society and to act 
responsibly in an ever-changing multicultural global 
context. (Prerequisite: ED 429 or permission of the 
instructor.) Three credits. 

ED 512 Contemporary Schooling in Society 

Students investigate and discuss current issues impor- 
tant to education, seeking to understand the relation- 
ship between the systemic nature of particular issues 
and their specific manifestations in local, national, and 
global arenas. In addition, students identify the ways 
that they, as educators and as citizens, attend to these 
issues at the local level. Formerly "Contemporary 
Issues in Education." (Prerequisite: at least six credits 
toward a master's degree) Three credits. 



34 



Curriculum and Instruction 



ED 517 Developing Collaborative Learning 
Methods 

This workshop allows the participant to develop collab- 
orative learning exercises within his or her curriculum. 
The workshop, which is predominately hands-on, ulti- 
mately aims to integrate collaborative exercises into the 
syllabi for the upcoming school year. Three credits. 

ED 521 Comparative Philosophies of Education 

This course offers a comparison of philosophical sys- 
tems influential in education. Three credits. 

ED 522 Learning and the Child's Experience 

Drawing from classic and current cross-disciplinary 
theory and practice, students in this course gain a 
comprehensive, culturally sensitive knowledge of how 
children and young adolescents in the elementary 
grades learn, think, and interact as social beings. 
Students consider the development of individual chil- 
dren within the larger context of educational institutions. 
Beginning with an introduction of Piaget's and 
Vygotsky's frameworks for the understanding of devel- 
opment, students will further explore constructivism and 
socio-historical cultural views of learning as they con- 
sider the relevance of theory for teaching practices. 
Formerly "The Developmental Process." Three credits. 

ED 531 Extending Literacy in the Elementary 
School: Grades 3-6 

This course explores the continuation of literacy devel- 
opment and learning, with emphasis on content-area 
literacy development in the later elementary grades. 
Guided by current research and practice in literacy, ped- 
agogy, human development, and multicultural educa- 
tion, students learn to assess and develop children's lit- 
eracy strategies and skills, organize and facilitate group 
and individual learning in reading and writing, and 
design and carry out content-based curriculum to sup- 
port continued literacy development and social respon- 
sibility. The course addresses the integration of visual 
and performing arts and appropriate use of electronic 
technology, includes collaborative work with cooperat- 
ing teachers, and requires at least two hours per week 
of fieldwork in priority school districts. Formerly 
"Methods of Teaching Literacy in the Elementary 
School: Grades 3-6." (Prerequisite: ED 437 or permis- 
sion of instructor) Three credits. 

ED 533 Learning Values: The Intersections of 
Individual and Cultural Values and 
Morality in Schooling 

In this course, students examine the enculturation 
processes that transmit and create values and morality 
in individuals. They examine how schools incorporate 
values and morality throughout formal and informal 
curricula. Through the examination of theoretical 
frameworks and case studies, students develop a 
critique of schooling as a normative institution, locate 
individual moral development within a cultural context, 
and examine the intersections of individual and cultural 
values and morality in schooling. Formerly "Learning 
Values: Moral Development and Moral Education." 
Three credits. 




ED 534 Theories of Learning 

This course presents a detailed consideration of the 
positions on the nature and conditions of human learn- 
ing found in the principal schools of psychology and in 
contemporary research. Cross-referenced as PY 534. 
Three credits. 

ED 536 School Community and Culture 

This course explores two phenomena, community and 
culture, with regard to their importance to meaningful 
education and schooling from kindergarten through 
higher education. Candidates critically examine the 
concepts of culture and community in elementary, sec- 
ondary, and post-secondary schools through assigned 
readings, class discussions, case studies, collaborative 
work, and field-based projects. In addition, candidates 
in this course examine some of the ways that commu- 
nity and culture are constructed at Fairfield University. 
Three credits. 

ED 540 Ethics for Educators 

Beginning with an understanding of key ethical theories, 
this course considers their application to a number of 
ethical problems facing reflective practitioners. What 
are the ethical obligations of those who take on the role 
of educator and can they be captured in a professional 
code of conduct? If so, what would such a code look 
like? This course also examines a number of ethical 
dilemmas faced by educators in their daily practice. 
Finally, the course explores the "ethical formation of 
teachers," including the Jesuit commitment to educating 
"men and women for others," while taking into account 
the cultural, social, and political context in which they 
teach. Three credits. 



Curriculum and Instruction 



35 



ED 545 Developing Integrated Curriculum for 

Elementary Students: Inquiry and Action 

Guided by current research and practice in pedagogy, 
human development, and multicultural education, stu- 
dents in this course design socially responsible, inquiry 
and action-oriented, interdisciplinary curriculum units 
that develop content knowledge, inquiry tools, techno- 
logical competence, social responsibility, and critical 
thinking. Current emphasis is on social studies, science, 
and health content. The course requires extensive col- 
laborative work. Formerly "Science, Health, and Social 
Studies in the Elementary Classroom." (Prerequisites: 
ED 437, ED 531 , or permission of the instructor) Three 
credits. 

ED 546 Integrating the Arts and Technology 
into the K-8 Curriculum 

This course demonstrates that music and the arts are 
an integral part of the school curriculum and that they 
can be utilized to promote awareness, acceptance, and 
respect for diverse cultures. Properly conceived, the 
arts constitute a great integrating force if viewed as a 
component of every discipline. New art forms and tech- 
niques of electronic artistic expressions have emerged 
with the advent of the new information age. Teachers 
and school media specialists must develop their aware- 
ness of conventional forms of art as well as electronic 
formats, their abundant resources, and their potential 
infusion within the K-8 school curriculum. Formerly 
"Integrating the Arts and Technology into the 
Elementary School Curriculum." Cross-referenced as 
MD 546. Three credits. 

ED 556 Creating Constructivist K-12 

Classrooms: Connecting Theory and 
Practices 

This course offers an interdisciplinary, project-based 
approach to constructivism for the classroom. Students 
explore issues of planning, implementing, and assess- 
ing constructivist-based instructional units and learn 
about classroom management and equity issues relat- 
ed to constructivist teaching and learning. The course 
provides an opportunity for participants to engage in 
hand-on activities that help students construct their own 
knowledge. Formerly "Constructivist Methods for 
Secondary Teachers." Three credits. 

ED 558 Youth, Identity and Culture 

This course explores contemporary adolescent identity 
and development. Drawing on current research, theory 
and practice, students will explore the creative potential 
and challenges of adolescence. Formerly "21st-century 
Adolescent Psychology." Three credits. 

ED 561 Summer Institute in the Teaching of 
Writing 

In this course for certified teachers of grades K-12 in all 
disciplines, participants become familiar with contempo- 
rary theory regarding aspects of literacy, with emphasis 
on composition theory. Participants explore best prac- 
tices that extend theory into the classroom. A primary 
focus for inquiry is language development for students 



for whom English is a second language and for "at risk" 
students. In addition, participants explore literacy 
issues through their own writing and through independ- 
ent research in an area of study that is appropriate to 
their professional needs. The Connecticut Writing 
Project/Fairfield prepares participants to provide profes- 
sional development support. Three credits. 

ED 565 Principles of Curriculum Development 
and Evaluation 

Students examine the principles, problems, theories, 
and critical issues in curriculum organization. The 
course emphasizes gaining practical knowledge about 
curriculum development and improvement, with a focus 
on the identification and systematic study of concerns 
and new directions in curriculum development and 
improvement based on current research and thought. 
Three credits. 

ED 579 Directed Observations and Seminar for 
Secondary DSAP Candidates: Part I 

This is part one of a two-semester course designed for 
those candidates working in the public secondary 
schools under a DSAP. Each course offers a semester- 
long experience in a public secondary school for quali- 
fied candidates. Participants engage in teaching five 
days each week. Emphasized concepts include class- 
room management dynamics, teaching techniques, les- 
son plan organization, and faculty duties. Candidates 
receive assistance from their University supervisor who 
will observe and evaluate each candidate a minimum of 
three times, as well as act as instructor of the seminar. 
The instructor will collaborate with the candidate to 
keep a line of communication open with the mentor for 
the candidate and with those assigned to assess the 
candidate at the district level. District evaluations will be 
submitted to the instructor. Seminars will meet weekly 
as needed. Most of the discussion in Seminar will flow 
from the needs of the participants. Candidates will cre- 
ate a Teaching and Learning Portfolio. Candidates must 
obtain permission to take this course from the Director 
of Secondary Certification Programs at the beginning 
of the previous semester. (Prerequisites: formal 
acceptance into the Teacher Preparation program and 
completion of certification course requirements and all 
subject area assignments) Three credits. 

ED 580 Directed Observation and Seminar for 
Secondary DSAP Candidates: Part II 

This is part two of a two-semester course designed for 
those candidates working in the public secondary 
schools under a DSAP. Each course offers a semester- 
long experience in a public secondary school for quali- 
fied candidates. Participants engage in teaching five 
days each week. Emphasized concepts include class- 
room management dynamics, teaching techniques, les- 
son plan organization, and faculty duties. Candidates 
receive assistance from their University supervisor who 
will observe and evaluate the candidate a minimum of 
three times as well as act as instructor of the seminar. 
The instructor will collaborate with the candidate and 



36 



Curriculum and Instruction 



keep a line of communication open with the mentor of 
the candidate and with those assigned to assess the 
candidate at the district level. District evaluations will be 
submitted to the instructor. Seminars will meet weekly 
as needed. Candidates will create a Professional 
Portfolio. Guest speakers will address relevant topics. 
Most of the discussion in seminar will flow from the 
needs of the participants. Candidates must obtain per- 
mission to take this course from the Director of 
Secondary Certification Programs at the beginning of 
the previous semester. (Prerequisites: Completion of 
ED 579) Three credits. 

ED 581 Directed Observation and Supervised 

Student Teaching: Secondary Education 

This course offers a semester-long experience in a local 
school for qualified candidates in secondary teaching. 
Participants engage in observation and teaching five 
days each week. Emphasized concepts include class- 
room management dynamics, teaching techniques, les- 
son plan organization, and faculty duties. Students 
receive assistance from their University supervisors and 
the cooperating teacher(s), who also observe and eval- 
uate each student. Students must register with the 
director of student teaching placement at the beginning 
of the previous semester. (Prerequisites: formal accept- 
ance into Teacher Preparation program and completion 
of all certification course requirements.) Six credits. 

ED 582 Student Teaching Seminar: 
Secondary Education 

Students take this weekly seminar concurrently with 
student teaching. The seminar focuses on the issues 
and problems faced by secondary student teachers and 
on the culture and organization of the schools. Although 
much of the seminar's subject matter flows from the 
ongoing student-teaching experience, it addresses 
issues such as school governance, school and district 
organizational patterns, mandated Connecticut testing, 
classroom management, conflict resolution, communi- 
cation with parents and caregivers, sensitivity to multi- 
cultural issues, and special education. The job applica- 
tion process, including resume writing, interviewing 
skills, and developing a professional portfolio and 
teaching portfolio are also addressed. Students receive 
information on the certification process. Three credits. 

ED 583 Elementary Student Teaching: 

Immersion in a Community of Practice 

This course offers a stimulating semester-long experi- 
ence consisting of two seven-week placements (one in 
a primary grade, one in an upper-elementary grade) in 
a local priority school district. Under the guidance of 
University supervision and intensive mentoring by coop- 
erating teachers, participants quickly assume full teach- 
ing responsibilities, including curriculum and lesson 
planning anchored in the principles of multicultural edu- 
cation and social responsibility, differentiated instruc- 
tion, and effective organization and management, while 
carrying out other faculty duties, including participation 
in school governance and professional development. As 



educators for social justice and social responsibility, 
they engage in related school and community-based 
activities with students, families, and community mem- 
bers. Participants must register with the director of stu- 
dent teaching placement at the beginning of the previ- 
ous semester. Formerly "Directed Observation and 
Supervised Student Teaching: Elementary Education." 
(Prerequisites: performance-based assessment includ- 
ing, but not limited to, successful completion of all pre- 
requisite certification track courses and requirements 
while a matriculated student in the Elementary 
Education M.A. program, permission of the elementary 
education program director, and an interview with the 
director of student teaching placements.) Six credits. 

ED 584 Reflective Practice Seminar: 
Elementary Education 

Participants take this weekly seminar concurrently with 
student teaching. Although much of the seminar's sub- 
ject matter flows from the ongoing student-teaching 
experience, it deliberately addresses issues such as 
socially responsible teaching, professional disposition 
and habits of mind, teacher research, school gover- 
nance, mandated Connecticut testing, classroom man- 
agement, conflict resolution, communication with par- 
ents/caregivers, sensitivity to multicultural issues, and 
special education. The course stresses continued 
reflective practice and professional development, 
including development of a professional portfolio, con- 
tinued study and research, and establishing a support- 
ive collegial network. Formerly "Student Teaching 
Seminar: Elementary Education." Three credits. 

ED 585 Supervised Teaching, Learning and 

Reflection in a Community of Practice: 
Parti 

This course is the first of a two-semester supervised 
experience designed for candidates for whom tradition- 
al student teaching is not appropriate because they are 
currently teaching in an elementary school. The evalua- 
tive tools used align with those used for student teach- 
ing and BEST assessment. In addition, the course 
incorporates monthly seminar meetings. Although much 
of the seminar's subject matter flows from the ongoing 
teaching experience, it deliberately addresses issues 
such as socially responsible teaching, professional dis- 
position and habits of mind, teacher research, school 
governance, classroom management, conflict resolu- 
tion, communication with parents/caregivers, and sensi- 
tivity to multicultural issues and inclusion. Continued 
professional development is stressed, including devel- 
opment of a professional portfolio, continued study and 
research, and establishing a supportive collegial net- 
work. Under the guidance of University supervision, 
teacher candidates assume full teaching responsibili- 
ties, including curriculum and lesson planning anchored 
in the principles of multicultural education and social 
responsibility, differentiated instruction, and effective 
organization and management: while carrying out other 
faculty duties, including participation in school gover- 
nance and professional development. As educators for 



Curriculum and Instruction 



37 



social justice and social responsibility, they engage in 
related school and community-based activities with stu- 
dents, families, and community members. Three cred- 
its. (Prerequisites: performance based assessment, 
including but not limited to successful completion of at 
least 27 prerequisite certification track credits and relat- 
ed course requirements while a matriculated student in 
the Elementary Education M.A. program, permission of 
the Elementary Education program director.) 

ED 586 Supervised Teaching, Learning and 

Reflection in a Community of Practice: 
Part 2 

This course is the second of a two-semester supervised 
experience designed for candidates for whom tradition- 
al student teaching is not appropriate because they are 
currently teaching in an elementary school. Part one 
must be taken during the preceding semester. The eval- 
uative tools used align with those used for student 
teaching and BEST assessment. In addition, the course 
incorporates monthly seminar meetings. Although much 
of the seminar's subject matter flows from the ongoing 
teaching experience, it deliberately addresses issues 
such as socially responsible teaching, professional dis- 
position and habits of mind, teacher research, school 
governance, classroom management, conflict resolu- 
tion, communication with parents/caregivers, and sensi- 
tivity to multicultural issues and inclusion. Continued 
professional development is stressed, including devel- 
opment of a professional portfolio, continued study and 
research, and establishing a supportive collegial net- 
work. Under the guidance of University supervision, 
teacher candidates assume full teaching responsibilities 
including curriculum and lesson planning anchored in 
the principles of multicultural education and social 
responsibility, differentiated instruction, and effective 
organization and management; while carrying out other 
faculty duties, including participation in school gover- 
nance and professional development. As educators for 
social justice and social responsibility, they engage in 
related school and community-based activities with 
students, families and community members. Three 
Credits. (Prerequisites: completion of "Supervised 
Teaching: part 1", performance based assessment, 
including but not limited to successful completion of at 
least 30 prerequisite certification track credits and relat- 
ed course requirements while a matriculated student in 
the Elementary Education M.A. program, permission of 
the Elementary Education program director.) 

ED 590 Reflective Research Practicum 
in Teaching 

Participants solve a practical problem in classroom 
teaching by applying educational research to a specific 
school situation. Formerly "Practicum in Teaching." 
Three credits. 



ED 595 Independent Study in Curriculum 
and Teaching 

This course requires self-selected activity by qualified 
students under faculty supervision. Options include field 
studies or library research with in-depth study of a 
problem for a specified time. Each student submits a 
preliminary proposal, detailed research design, and a 
comprehensive report and evaluation. The course 
requires frequent consultation with the faculty advisor. 
Three credits. 

SE 405 Exceptional Learners in the Mainstream 

The course familiarizes the mainstream professional 
with the special needs of children and youth with 
mental retardation, learning disabilities, emotional dis- 
turbances, severe disabilities, and multiple disabilities, 
and those who are gifted and talented. Topics include: 
methods of identifying and working effectively with 
special needs children and youth in the regular 
classroom; the roles and responsibilities of counselors, 
psychologists, educators, and ancillary personnel as 
members of a multidisciplinary team in planning educa- 
tional services for exceptional learners; laws that impact 
on assessment, placement, and parent and student 
rights; and support services. Three credits. 

SE 430 Special Learners in the Regular 
Classroom 

This course familiarizes the mainstream teacher with 
the developmental learning needs of children and 
youth who are exceptional. Topics include the special 
learning needs of mentally retarded, learning disabled, 
emotionally disturbed, and gifted and talented children 
and adolescents; and methods of identifying and work- 
ing effectively with special-needs children and youth in 
the regular classroom. Three credits. 

HI 400 United States History for Educators 

This course provides students seeking Connecticut 
teaching certification with an understanding of U.S. his- 
tory. Students who successfully complete this course 
gain a complex and culturally sensitive understanding of 
the rich social history of the individuals and groups who 
are the peoples of the United States of America. 
Students explore and use the central concepts and 
tools of inquiry of historians as they develop their 
knowledge. Guided by current theory and practice in 
culturally sensitive pedagogy, human development, and 
multicultural education, students, as socially responsi- 
ble, critically informed educators, consider how to 
facilitate K-12 students' responsible and effective partic- 
ipation in a pluralistic democratic society. Three credits. 



38 



Curriculum and Instruction 



Teaching Fields 

EN 405 Literature for Young Adults 

During the past two decades, adolescent literature has 
proliferated, grown more diverse, and improved in rich- 
ness and quality. The course explores the major current 
authors, poets, and illustrators of works written for 
young adults. Topics include theories and purposes of 
reading literature in the classroom; criteria development 
for evaluating adolescent literature; reader response in 
the classroom; reading workshop; and adolescent liter- 
ature integration across the curriculum. Three credits. 

EN 406 Infusing Multicultural Literature in 
Elementary and Middle Schools 

In this course, students examine literature written for 
children and young adolescents that supports the 
principles of multicultural education and social respon- 
sibility. Through assigned and self-selected projects, 
participants design curricula and examine issues 
relevant to the intersections of literature and multicultur- 
al education and social responsibility. Formerly 
"Multicultural Literature K-8." Three credits. 



EN 411 Teaching Writing in the 3-12 Classroom 

This course provides teachers and prospective teach- 
ers with a theoretical background in writing process 
as well as practical techniques for applying the theory. 
The course helps teachers develop awareness of their 
own composing processes and the processes of others. 
Topics include writing needs of diverse populations, 
the reading/writing relationship, writing of different 
genres, mini-lessons, conferencing techniques, revision 
techniques, writing across the curriculum, publishing 
alternatives, portfolios, and other forms of assessment. 
Underlying the class is the premise that in sharing their 
perspectives, teachers at the elementary and second- 
ary levels enhance each other's performance as writing 
educators and as writers. Three credits. 

EN 417 Traditional and Structural Grammar 

Designed for English education majors and for 
experienced English teachers, this course presents an 
introduction to the principles of modern descriptive 
linguistics, especially as it relates to present-day 
English, its grammatical structure, its sound and 
spelling systems, and its vocabulary and rules of usage. 
The course approaches modern English grammar from 
structural and transformational viewpoints, placing spe- 
cial emphasis on the teaching of language arts, includ- 
ing composition and stylistic analysis. Three credits. 



Marriage and Family Therapy 



39 



MARRIAGE AND 
FAMILY THERAPY 



Faculty 

Rona Preli (chair) 

Ingeborg Haug (clinical director) 



The master of arts degree in marriage and family 
therapy prepares students for careers as marriage and 
family therapists. The curriculum and clinical training at 
Fairfield University focuses on preparing the student 
to work in a wide variety of professional settings with 
diverse populations who are experiencing a broad 
range of problems. The program is dedicated to provid- 
ing a learning context that fundamentally values 
diversity and nondiscrimination. The core curriculum, 
the clinical training component of the program and the 
faculty and supervisors strive to address diversity, 
power, privilege, and social justice in all aspects of 
training and education. Toward that end, the faculty is 
committed to creating an environment that welcomes 
and provides mentorship to a diverse student body by a 
diverse group of faculty, instructors, and supervisors. 
The program is accredited by the Commission on 
Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy 
Education of the American Association for Marriage 
and Family Therapy. Upon completion of the planned 
program of study, students may apply for Associate 
Membership in AAMFT. Upon completion of additional 
required clinical experience and supervision, according 
to Connecticut statutes, graduates may apply for 
Connecticut licensure in marriage and family therapy 
and Clinical Membership in AAMFT. 



Admission to the Department 

Admission decisions are made twice yearly. Students 
should submit application materials no later than 
March 15 for summer and fall admission and Oct. 15 for 
spring admission. 

All candidates will be required to participate in a group 
interview as part of the admission process. Candidates 
will be notified in writing of their eligibility for the group 
interview. 

Given the professional responsibility one assumes as a 
marriage and family therapist, students whose work 
continues to be of marginal academic quality despite 
remedial efforts or who demonstrate personal qualities 
that are not conducive to the role of the marriage and 
family therapist as cited in the Marriage and Family 
Therapy Program Student Handbook, will not be rec- 
ommended for continuation in the program. All students 
are required to adhere to the AAMFT Code of Ethics 



and the Marriage and Family Therapy Program policies 
and procedures. In addition, the Disposition Statement 
presented on page 23 is applicable to this program as it 
is to all programs in the Graduate School of Education 
and Allied Professions. 



Requirements for the M.A. 

The M.A. degree in marriage and family therapy requires 
continuous enrollment and completion of 57 credits. In 
addition, students must maintain an overall grade point 
average of 3.0, complete a minimum of 500 direct 
contact hours of clinical treatment (250 of which must 
be relational hours), plus 100 hours of supervision (50 
of which must be individual supervision using direct 
observation of students' clinical work), and pass a com- 
prehensive examination at the end of the program. 



Program of Study 



Theoretical Foundations (six credits) 

FT 550 Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy 

FT 555 Foundations of Marital and Family Therapy 

Clinical Practice (27 credits) 

FT 525 Divorce, Single-Parenting, and Remarriage 

FT 552 Intervention in Structural and Strategic 

Family Therapy 
FT 553 Family Therapy Pre-Practicum 
FT 561 Advanced Interventions in Family Therapy 
FT 567 Couples Therapy 
FT 569 Assessment Techniques in Marriage and 

Family Therapy 
FT 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 
FT 562 Human Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction 
FT 465 Introduction to Substance Abuse and 

Addictions 

Individual Development and Family Relations 

(three credits) 

FT 447 Lifespan Human Development 

Professional Identity and Ethics (three credits) 
FT 565 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in 
Family Therapy 

Research (three credits) 

FT 556 Research in Marriage and Family Therapy 

Supervised Clinical Practice (12 credits; courses 
must be taken in sequence and without interruption) 
FT 559 Practicum in Family Therapy I 
FT 560 Practicum in Family Therapy II 
FT 580 Internship in Family Therapy I 
FT 581 Internship in Family Therapy II 



40 



Marriage and Family Therapy 



Additional Learning 

(To complete the 57-credit requirement if waivers are 

accepted) 

CN 500 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy 

CN 466 Spirituality and Counseling 

SE 441 Parents and Families of Individuals with 

Disabilities 
FT 568 Special Topics in Family Therapy 

Comprehensive examination 



Family Counseling Center at 
Fairfield University 

The Marriage and Family Therapy program operates a 
clinic on the campus of Fairfield University. The Family 
Counseling Center is a nonprofit center dedicated to 
providing therapeutic services to individuals, couples, 
and families and to training professional marriage and 
family therapists. Advanced graduate students, under 
the supervision of professional faculty and supervisors, 
staff the Center. In addition, the program has contractu- 
al relationships with 32 off-campus placements sites. 
These sites are chosen for their ability to expose 
students to diverse populations experiencing a broad 
range of presenting problems from normative develop- 
mental issues to severe mental illness. Students have 
the opportunity to work with clients experiencing 
domestic violence, addiction, terminal and chronic 
physical illness, incarceration, divorce, infidelity, run- 
aways, suicide, and child abuse. The off-campus 
settings are varied and include medical facilities, addic- 
tions treatment programs, adolescent outpatient and 
inpatient treatment programs, child guidance agencies, 
community service agencies, mental health centers, 
Christian and Jewish counseling programs, court affili- 
ated and alternative to incarceration programs, family 
service agencies, youth service programs, and domes- 
tic violence programs. Fees for services at the Family 
Counseling Center are based on a sliding scale. For 
further information, call (203) 254-4000, ext. 2306. 



Course Descriptions 



FT 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

Students examine issues in counseling individuals 
and families from diverse ethnic, cultural, racial, and 
socioeconomic backgrounds and discuss the social, 
educational, economic, and behavioral factors that 
impact clinical work. The course addresses counseling 
men, women, and couples, and the issues of gender 
role stereotyping and changing sex roles, and inte- 
grates professional contributions from individual coun- 
seling and family therapy literature. Cross-referenced 
as CN 433. Three credits. 



FT 447 Lifespan Human Development 

This course explores the processes of individual and 
family development from childhood through old age. 
Presenting theoretical perspectives for studying child, 
adult, and family development, the course examines the 
modifications of family structures over time and psycho- 
social development within family systems and cultural 
contexts. Cross-referenced as CN 447/PY 447. Three 
credits. 

FT 465 Introduction to Substance Abuse and 
Addictions 

Students explore basic information about the history and 
current use/abuse of various drugs and alcohol. Topics 
include addiction, the 12-step programs, physiological 
effects, FAS, COAs, and family systems as well as cul- 
turally relevant prevention, intervention, and treatment 
strategies for individuals and families. Cross-referenced 
as CN 465. Three credits. 

FT 525 Divorce, Single-Parenting, and 
Remarriage 

This course considers the implications of divorce, single 
parenting, remarriage, and step-parenting for families 
experiencing these transitions and for society at large. 
Specific topics include boundary issues during transi- 
tion, legal aspects of divorce custody decisions, school 
issues for children of divorce, and the complexities of 
single-parenting and blending families, with an empha- 
sis on recent research regarding divorce and its after- 
math. Three credits. 

FT 550 Introduction to Marriage and 
Family Therapy 

This course provides an overview of the historical devel- 
opment of the field of family therapy, acquainting stu- 
dents with the models developed by Minuchin, Haley, 
Madanes, Satir, Bowen, Whitaker, and others. The 
course focuses on distinguishing between the systemic 
approaches in terms of assessment, conceptualization, 
diagnosis, treatment, and theoretical foundations, and 
explores contemporary directions of the field. Three 
credits. 

FT 552 Intervention in Structural and Strategic 
Family Therapy 

This course focuses on the models of Minuchin, Haley, 
Madanes, and MRI, with an emphasis on developing a 
substantive understanding of diagnosis, assessment, 
and intervention design. The course addresses the 
range of techniques associated with each orientation, 
indications and contra- indications for using specific 
techniques, rationale development for intervention, and 
the role of the therapist. (Prerequisite: FT 550) Three 
credits. 

FT 553 Family Therapy Pre-Practicum 

Taken after FT 552 and with the approval of the clinical 
director, this course provides simulated experiences in 
the practice of family therapy and focuses on developing 
skills in joining and forming a therapeutic relationship, 
designing and implementing interventions, and the use 
of self at the various stages of therapy. The course 



Marriage and Family Therapy 



41 



emphasizes the structural, strategic, and systemic family 
therapy models and addresses culturally sensitive prac- 
tice, management, and treatment of cases of suicide, 
child abuse, domestic violence, and incest. Successful 
completion of this course and the requirements deter- 
mines readiness for clinical practice. (Prerequisites: FT 
550, FT 552; students must have a signed clinical train- 
ing agreement on file before registration) Three credits. 

FT 555 Foundations of Marital and 
Family Therapy 

This course exposes students to the theories upon which 
the models of family therapy are based, exploring the 
critical epistemological issues in family therapy theory. 
Furthermore, it helps students think about therapy theo- 
retically, preparing students to understand and contribute 
to current thinking in the field in regard to theory and 
practice. Topics include general systems theory, cyberat- 
ics, communication theory, constructivism, and current 
developments in epistemology. Three credits. 

FT 556 Research in Marriage and Family Therapy 

This course covers the methodology, design, and statis- 
tical procedures for research in marriage and family ther- 
apy. The course addresses selecting appropriate experi- 
mental designs, data analysis and understanding the 
inferential potential of statistical procedures, and evalu- 
ating published research, including efficacy and outcome 
studies in marriage and family therapy. The course con- 
tent includes quantitative and qualitative research in the 
field with recognition of cultural factors in research 
design and methodology. Three credits. 

FT 559 Practicum in Family Therapy I 

This course provides clinical experience working with 
families and meets the standards for training established 
by the American Association for Marriage and Family 
Therapy and the Connecticut Department of Health and 
Addiction Services. Students provide five hours per week 
of service in the Family Counseling Center plus five to 10 
hours per week of service in a community agency offer- 
ing family therapy treatment under supervision. The 
practicum follows consecutively after FT 553. 
(Prerequisites: FT 550, FT 552, FT 553, FT 565) Three 
credits. 

FT 560 Practicum in Family Therapy II 

Continuation of FT 559. (Prerequisite: FT 559) Three 
credits. 

FT 561 Advanced Interventions in 
Family Therapy 

This course explores in depth the theory and techniques 
of postmodern models of family therapy. It focuses on 
developing a substantive understanding of the theoreti- 
cal assumptions and clinical applications of solution- 
focused and narrative therapies and provides opportuni- 
ties to apply techniques and explore the therapist's use 
of self through role-play and clinical observations. 
(Prerequisites: FT 550, FT 552) Three credits. 

FT 562 Human Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction 

This course examines issues related to sexuality in 



human life and treatment of sexual problems. Issues 
include sexual value systems, cultural context, sexual 
identity and orientation, gender issues and develop- 
ment of gender identity, forms of sexual conduct, sexu- 
ality across the life span, and sexual issues in couple 
relationships. Three credits. 

FT 565 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues 
in Family Therapy 

This course examines issues specific to the clinical 
practice and profession of marriage and family therapy. 
Areas of study include ethical decision-making and the 
code of ethics; professional socialization and the role of 
professional organizations; licensure and certification; 
legal responsibilities and liabilities of clinical practice; 
research, family law, confidentiality issues, AAMFT 
Code of Ethics, interprofessional cooperation, and men- 
tal health care delivery systems. (Prerequisite: FT 550) 
Three credits. 

FT 567 Couples Therapy 

This course reviews a variety of approaches to under- 
standing, conceptualizing, and treating marital relation- 
ships and conflicts with cultural sensitivity, addressing 
special problems such as extramarital affairs, alco- 
holism, and ethics in couples work. Three credits. 

FT 568 Special Topics in Family Therapy 

This course explores advanced topics in the field of 
family therapy. Topics may vary each semester and are 
determined by the marriage and family therapy depart- 
ment chair as a reflection of pertinent themes of interest 
in the specialization. One to three credits. 

FT 569 Assessment Techniques in Marriage 
and Family Therapy 

This advanced family therapy course addresses clinical 
diagnosis and assessment in the treatment process. 
Topics include major family therapy assessment meth- 
ods and instruments, familiarity with the DSM IV, 
pharmacological treatments, and recognition and criti- 
cal assessment of cultural factors. Three credits. 

FT 580 Internship in Family Therapy I 

During internship students provide 10 to 15 hours of 
clinical services at an off-campus internship site. They 
receive weekly individual and group supervision by an 
approved site supervisor and weekly group supervision 
by University faculty. (Prerequisites: FT 560, FT 561) 
Three credits. 

FT 581 Internship in Family Therapy II 

Continuation of FT 580. Students must complete all 
clinical and supervisory hours by the close of the grad- 
ing period to be eligible for graduation. (Cannot be 
taken concurrently with FT 569.) Three credits. 

FT 595 Independent Study in Marriage and 
Family Therapy 

Students undertake individual projects in consultation 
with a faculty member based on proposals submitted 
one semester in advance of course registration. Three 
to six credits. 



42 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



PSYCHOLOGY, SPECIAL 
EDUCATION, AND 
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 



Faculty 

Daniel Geller (chair) 
Faith-Anne Dohm 
Elizabeth Langran 
Paula Gill Lopez 
Christine Siegel 
David Aloyzy Zera 



The Department ot Psychology, Special Education, and 
Educational Technology offers concentrations in studies 
that prepare candidates for careers in a variety of 
human service and educational technology areas. The 
department has, as its primary objective, a collaborative 
approach to contributing to the quality of life in our 
changing schools and society. The department is dedi- 
cated to making significant contributions to the: 

• Enhancement of self-understanding; 

• Improvement of service delivery options to children, 
youth, and adults: 

• Enrichment of child-parent relationships; 

• Increased effectiveness of schools, support agencies, 
and other organizations; 

• Improvement of adaptive behavior and healthy devel- 
opment; 

• Leadership in the areas of theory, assessment, and 
understanding of differences among children, youth, 
adults, and those with disabilities, with special empha- 
sis on differentiating typical cultural characteristics 
from pathology; 

• Development of effective strategies in curricular, 
behavioral, technological, therapeutic, and organiza- 
tional interventions; 

• Improvement of teacher-teacher, teacher-child, and 
teacher-parent and employer-employee relationships; 

• Integration of special education into total school pro- 
grams; 

• Enhancement of the human potential and facilitation 
of healthy development and the primary prevention of 
problems in school, at home, in organizations, and in 
the community. 

• Development and implementation of a wide and effec- 
tive range of instructional and telecommunication 
technologies. 



Psychology 

Students may choose from one of several sequences of 
study. They may pursue a specialist preparation in 
school psychology; elect a program in psychology that 
finds application in the promotion of work productivity; 
select courses that enrich competencies required in 
human services and community work; or strengthen 
their knowledge of psychology in preparation for further 
graduate study in various fields. All of the programs 
provide for the development of a basic foundation of 
knowledge in psychology and related fields, as well as 
emphasize the application of knowledge in assessing 
and understanding others. 

To supplement course work, the faculty has established 
working relationships within the settings where psycho- 
logical skills are applied. These settings include 
schools, child and family mental health and rehabilita- 
tion services, corporate training and development 
settings, and human resource programs in the private 
sector. These relationships provide for the coordination 
of real life experiences and academic training and serve 
dual purposes. First, students have the opportunity 
to practice newly acquired skills in real settings with 
experienced supervisors supported by University facul- 
ty. Second, the addition of graduate students to estab- 
lished staff enhances the resources available in the 
community. 



School Psychology 

The School Psychology program at Fairfield University 
is a 63-credit program that follows the curriculum guide- 
lines as prepared by the National Association of School 
Psychologists (2000). The tripartite model of school 
psychology espoused by the program includes consul- 
tation, assessment, and direct intervention. In addition 
to the tripartite model, several paradigms form the core 
philosophy of the School Psychology program. These 
paradigms include emphases on the scientist-practition- 
er tradition, reflective practice, primary prevention, 
developmental and systems theory, and becoming 
agents of change. To assist in the exploration of these 
paradigms, students develop portfolios documenting 
their personal and professional growth throughout the 
program. Additionally, students are prepared in theoret- 
ical foundations and with practicum experiences in 
schools and/or agencies. The program culminates in an 
internship experience, "consisting of 10 school months, 
or its equivalent in a period not to exceed 20 school 
months, of supervised experience in a school setting 
under the supervision of a certified school psychologist, 
the local school system, and the preparing institution," 
(Connecticut Certification Regulations for School 
Psychology, Section 10145d-59.a.4). 



Psychology. Special Education, and Educational Technology 



43 



Admission to the School Psychology Program 

Applications to the program are reviewed on an annual 
basis. Successful applicants begin in the fall semester. 
The application deadline is Jan. 15 for fall admission. 

After an initial paper review, successful applicants are 
invited to campus for a group interview. The interview is 
intended to clarify applicants' understanding of the pro- 
gram and the profession, and to assess applicants' 
potential for success as students. It is also a State 
requirement for all certification programs. After admis- 
sion, each student is expected to meet with a faculty 
advisor to outline a planned program of study before 
beginning coursework. Admitted students may take 
courses in the summer prior to their first fall term after 
obtaining approval from an advisor. 



Requirements for the M.A. 

All students admitted to the School Psychology pro- 
gram must satisfy the requirements for the M.A. degree 
as listed in the program of study. Those students admit- 
ted into the M.A. program who did not complete an 
undergraduate major in psychology may be required to 
take additional coursework as identified by their advisor. 

Students who elect to take the comprehensive exami- 
nation must have completed 24 credits. These credits 
must include CN 433, PY 430, PY 433, PY 435, PY 436, 
and PY 446. Part-time students have the option of writ- 
ing a master's thesis in lieu of the comprehensive 
examination. The master's thesis option is appropriate 
for those part-time students who wish to more fully 
investigate a germane aspect of psychology through an 
organized method of research or an exploration that 
may be considered a contribution to the field. Students 
must consult with a full-time department faculty member 
about the process, availability, and procedures related 
to this option and obtain approval of the thesis topic 
prior to registering for PY 596 Master's Thesis in 
Psychology. A completed and approved thesis must be 
submitted to fulfill this option. Additional coursework 
may be required for students who were not psychology 
majors as undergraduates. The advanced thesis option 
is available to full-time students who wish to complete a 
research project. The advanced thesis in psychology 
cannot be completed in lieu of the master's compre- 
hensive examination. 



Requirements for the C.A.S. 

Those wishing to be accepted for matriculation at the 
C.A.S. level and/or those wishing to be endorsed by the 
University for state certification as a school psychologist 
must first complete the M.A. course requirements in 
school psychology. Applicants with related master's 
degrees may be considered for admission into the 
C.A.S. program. However, all master's degree course- 
work in the School Psychology program must be com- 
pleted and the M.A. degree posted to the candidate's 
transcript. 




A separate admission application for the C.A.S. must be 
submitted. 

Additionally, the student portfolio developed during the 
master's program must be reviewed with faculty before 
a student can be admitted into the C.A.S. program in 
school psychology. Students must review their portfolio 
with faculty a second time before they are granted 
approval to begin their internship sequence, PY 598 
and PY 599. 

Students who are accepted into the C.A.S. program 
with related degrees must fulfill all program course 
requirements. They must also develop and/or review 
their portfolios with faculty before being eligible to begin 
their internship sequence, PY 598 and PY 599. A mini- 
mum of 30 credits must be completed at Fairfield 
University in order to receive an institutional endorse- 
ment for state certification. 



School Psychologist Certification 

A graduate student who successfully completes this 
course of study earns an M.A. degree and a sixth year 
C.A.S. and meets the Connecticut certification require- 
ments. When the entire program has been completed 
(63 credits), the student must apply through the dean's 
office to receive an endorsement from the Graduate 
School of Education and Allied Professions for 
Connecticut's Initial Educator's Certificate in school 
psychology. 

In view of the essential responsibility of the program to 
assure the protection of the healthy development of 
children and youth served by school psychologists, the 
faculty reserves the right to discontinue the program of 
any student, at any time in the program, whose aca- 
demic performance is marginal, whose comprehensive 



44 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 




' 



examination results are not rated as passing, or whose 
personal qualities are not appropriate to the field. Such 
a student may be denied recommendation for certifica- 
tion. In addition, the Disposition Statement presented 
on page 23 is applicable to this program as it is to all 
programs in the Graduate School of Education and 
Allied Professions. 



School Psychology Program of Study 

M.A. in School Psychology (33 credits) 

CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 

PY 430 Issues in Professional Practice in 

School Psychology 
PY 433 Behavioral Statistics 
PY 435 Psychology of Personality 
PY 436 Psychopathology and Classification I 
PY 438 Treatment Models for School-Age Youth 
PY 446 Developmental Psychology I: Theory and 

Application in Professional Practice 
PY 534 Theories of Learning 
PY 548 Psychotherapeutic Techniques for 

School-Age Youth 
SE 403 Psychoeducational Issues in Special 

Education 

OR 
SE 405 Exceptional Learners in the Mainstream 

Comprehensive Examination in School Psychology 

OR 
PY 596 Master's Thesis in Psychology* 

'PY 596 Master's Thesis in Psychology requires special 
approval from a student's advisor. 



C.A.S. in 


PY449 


PY535 


PY538 


PY540 


PY544 


PY576 


PY577 


PY598 


PY599 



School Psychology (30 credits) 
Introduction to Clinical Child 
Neuropsychology 
Collaborative Consultation 
Educational and Psychological Assessment 
Projective Techniques 
Integrated Assessment 
Field Work in Child Study I 
Field Work in Child Study II 
Internship in School Psychology I 
Internship in School Psychology II 



Applied Psychology 

Different concentrations of study are available to stu- 
dents seeking a master's degree in applied psychology. 
Some students wish to strengthen their academic back- 
ground in psychology before pursuing further graduate 
studies in various fields at other institutions. Others 
seek to enhance their current careers in human service 
work in community settings. Still others are interested 
in applying their learning in corporate or other organiza- 
tional settings 



Admission to the Applied Psychology Program 

Applications to the program are reviewed twice yearly. 
Application deadlines are Feb. 1 for fall admission and 
Oct. 1 for spring admission. 

An interview with one or more faculty members may be 
required for admission to the Applied Psychology pro- 
gram. The interview is intended to clarify the applicant's 
understanding of the program and the profession, and 
to evaluate the applicant's potential success as a stu- 
dent. After admission, each student is required to meet 
with a faculty advisor to outline a planned program of 
study. Prior to registering for courses each semester, 
students are encouraged to meet with their advisor. 

The Applied Psychology program offers three tracks of 
study: human services psychology, foundations of 
advanced psychology, and industrial/ organizational/ 
personnel psychology. The formal educational experi- 
ences may be supplemented by subsequent training in 
a work setting. Additional requirements for the different 
tracks include: 

1 . Human services psychology - This track requires the 
completion of 39 credits of approved courses. 
Twenty-four of these credits must be in psychology. 

2. Foundations of advanced psychology -This program 
of study requires completion of 36 credits of 
approved courses. Twenty-seven of these credits 
must be in psychology. 

3. Industrial/organizational/personnel psychology -This 
program of study requires completion of 39 credits of 
approved courses. Twenty-seven of these credits 
must be in psychology. 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



45 



Comprehensive examination 

Successful completion of the master's comprehensive 
examination is required of all students. 

The comprehensive examination in psychology requires 
students to demonstrate understanding and mastery of 
a broad body of relevant knowledge in psychology, as 
well as the ability to synthesize this knowledge in the 
creation of sophisticated essays. 

Students are eligible to take the master's comprehen- 
sive examination after successful completion of 24 cred- 
its, 18 of which must be specifically in psychology. 

Students in the Applied Psychology program are expect- 
ed to act in accordance with the American Psychological 
Association's ethical principles. Students who behave 
unethically may be dismissed from the program. The 
ethical principles are available at www.apa.org/ethics. In 
addition, the Disposition Statement presented on page 
23 is applicable to this program as it is to all programs in 
the Graduate School of Education and Allied Profession. 



Applied Psychology Program of Study 
Track I - Human Services Psychology 

(39 credits) 

Core (required) 

CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

FT 550 Introduction to Marriage and Family 

Therapy 
PY 435 Psychology of Personality 
PY 436 Psychopathology and Classification I 
PY 437 Psychopathology and Classification II 
PY 446 Developmental Psychology I 

OR 
PY 447 Lifespan Human Development 
PY 448 History and Systems in Psychology 
PY 471 Effective Interviewing 
PY 536 Educational and Psychological Testing 
PY 597 Seminar in Psychology 

Electives (nine credits) 

All electives must be approved by Dr. Geller or 

Dr. Dohm. 

Recommended electives for Track I are: 

SE 411 Introduction to Mental Retardation 

SE 413 Introduction to Learning Disabilities 

PY 404 Forensic Psychology and Expert Testimony 

PY 534 Theories of Learning 



Track II - Foundations of Advanced Psychology 

(36 credits) 

Core (required) 

CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

PY 433 Behavioral Statistics 

PY 435 Psychology of Personality 

PY 436 Psychopathology and Classification I 

PY 437 Psychopathology and Classification II 

PY 446 Developmental Psychology 

PY 448 History and Systems in Psychology 

PY 475 Program Evaluation 

PY 536 Educational and Psychological Testing 

PY 571 Research in Psychology 

PY 597 Seminar in Psychology 

Electives (three credits) 

All electives must be approved by Dr. Geller or 

Dr. Dohm. 

Recommended electives for Track II are: 

SE 411 Introduction to Mental Retardation 

SE 413 Introduction to Learning Disabilities 

PY 534 Theories of Learning 



Track III - Industrial/Organizational/Personnel 
Psychology (39 credits) 

Core (required) 

CN 455 Group Work: Theories and Practice 

PY 406 Organizational Development 

PY 420 Introduction to Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology 
PY 433 Behavioral Statistics 
PY 435 Psychology of Personality 
PY 471 Effective Interviewing 
PY 475 Program Evaluation 
PY 536 Educational and Psychological Testing 
PY 545 Designing Development and Training 

Programs 
PY 571 Research in Psychology 
PY 578 Field Work in Applied Psychology 
PY 594 Seminar in Applied and 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

OR 
PY 597 Seminar in Psychology 

Electives (three credits) 

All electives must be approved by Dr. Geller or 

Dr. Dohm. 

Recommended elective for Track III are: 

CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

PY 448 History and Systems in Psychology 

PY 534 Theories of Learning 

MD 400 Introduction to Education Technology 



46 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



Course Descriptions 



PY 403 Introduction to Play Therapy 

This course provides students with instruction in client- 
centered play therapy. Course objectives for students 
include enhancing sensitivity to children's issues, devel- 
oping an awareness of the world as viewed by children, 
increasing the ability to communicate effectively with 
children using play techniques, understanding chil- 
dren's behavior, communicating effectively with parents, 
and developing basic play therapy skills. Students also 
view demonstrations of actual play therapy sessions 
and gain experience applying play therapy strategies 
with children. (Prerequisite: This course is available to 
students enrolled in a certification program or those who 
are already certified.) Three credits. 

PY 404 Forensic Psychology and Expert 
Testimony 

This course covers the diverse aspects and activities in 
forensic psychology, exposing students to the process 
of forensic assessment (criminal law matters and in 
domestic law cases), as well as briefly reviewing rele- 
vant law. Other areas include consultations with the 
police and consultations regarding probation and parole 
decisions as well as sexual offenses, expert testimony, 
offender rehabilitation, competence of juries, and other 
related topics. Three credits. 

PY 406 Organizational Development 

This course explores and analyzes the various methods 
and techniques for effective organizational development 
in contemporary organizations. The course focuses on 
models, case studies, and student examination of 
organizations with which they are affiliated. Students 
identify and study key success factors such as organi- 
zational culture, leadership, and history. (Prerequisites: 
PY 420, PY 433, PY 435, PY 545) Three credits. 

PY410 Psychopharmacology 

This course reviews essential biopsychology: examines 
the biological/biochemical hypotheses of the major psy- 
chiatric disorders: surveys the mechanisms of action 
and behavioral effects of the major classifications of 
drugs; and examines their uses in adult and childhood 
disorders. (Prerequisite: basic knowledge of neuro- 
chemical transmission or permission of the instructor) 
Three credits. 

PY 420 Introduction to Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology 

This course introduces the application of psychological 
concepts, principles, and methods to process issues 
and problems in the work environment. Topics include 
personnel selection, training and development, work 
motivation, job satisfaction and effectiveness, work 
design, and organizational theory. Three credits. 

PY 430 Issues in Professional Practice in 
School Psychology 

Among the first courses that should be taken in the 
School Psychology program, this course presents a 
realistic view of school psychology, permitting partici- 



pants to interview school psychologists and other 
school personnel in the field about the role of the school 
psychologist. It serves as a vehicle to affect the future 
of school psychology by empowering future school 
psychologists, and it introduces the issues primary to 
the profession and practice of school psychology. 
Topics include special education law; professional 
ethics: the history of school psychology; a tripartite 
model of service delivery; the "scientific practitioner" 
approach; consultation; child development and system 
theory as a basis for practice; advocacy for and educa- 
tion about the school psychologist's role; and an intro- 
duction to federal and state educational systems within 
which the profession operates. Three credits. 

PY 433 Behavioral Statistics 

Participants study descriptive and inferential statistics 
with an emphasis on applications in the behavioral sci- 
ences. Topics range from measures of central tendency 
to parametric and nonparametric tests of significance. 
(Students with a prior course in statistics may try to test 
out of PY 433 before the first class. Contact the instruc- 
tor well in advance of the first class to make arrange- 
ments. Students who successfully test out of this course 
will substitute another approved three-credit course 
appropriate to their program. Three credits. 

PY 435 Psychology of Personality 

This course takes a comprehensive approach to under- 
standing theories of personality formation through an 
in-depth survey and critique of major and minor theories 
of personality. The course emphasizes developing a 
critical understanding of the similarities and differences 
among the theories and the contribution of each theory 
to conceptualizations of normal and abnormal behavior, 
and covers current research in personality psychology. 
Three credits. 

PY 436 Psychopathology and Classification I 

This course introduces students to advanced child and 
adolescent psychopathology. It provides the necessary 
foundation for undertaking subsequent courses or 
supervised practical training focused on the actual 
practice of formulating diagnoses and treating children 
and adolescents who are experiencing mental 
disorders. The course includes in-depth exposure to 
and discussion of the DSM-IV and current research in 
psychopathology, and emphasizes understanding and 
identifying mental disorder symptoms and syndromes. 
Three credits. 

PY 437 Psychopathology and Classification II 

This course introduces students to advanced adult 
psychopathology. It provides the necessary foundation 
for undertaking subsequent courses or supervised 
practical training focused on the actual practice of 
formulating diagnoses and treating people who are 
experiencing mental disorders. The course includes 
in-depth exposure to and discussion of the DSM-IV and 
current research in psychopathology, and emphasizes 
understanding and identifying mental disorder symp- 
toms and syndromes. Three credits. 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



47 



PY 438 Treatment Models for School-Age Youth 

In this course, students learn to develop treatment plans 
for children and adolescents in schools. Various psy- 
chotherapy models bridge the gap between theory and 
practice. Case studies serve as the primary learning 
vehicle. Given that children and adolescents frequently 
demonstrate emotional difficulties in the school setting, 
the course highlights theoretically informed therapeutic 
interventions that are pragmatic for use in the school 
setting, and emphasizes the importance of recognizing 
individual differences (cognitive, cultural, etc.) when 
designing interventions. (Prerequisites: PY 435, 
PY 436) Three credits. 

PY 446 Developmental Psychology I: Theory and 
Application in Professional Practice 

Students study human development from birth through 
adolescence. Designed for graduate students pursuing 
careers as clinical practitioners, this course helps par- 
ticipants develop the basic skills necessary to under- 
stand their clients in the context of the various domains 
of human development. Students learn to identify devi- 
ations in development and craft corresponding interven- 
tion plans. The course also emphasizes cultural compe- 
tence, providing students with an understanding of indi- 
viduals and families within a cultural context. Three 
credits. 

PY 447 Lifespan Human Development 

This course explores the processes of individual and 
family development from childhood through old age. 
The course examines theoretical perspectives for 
studying child, adult, and family development, paying 
special attention to physical, cognitive, emotional, and 
social/moral development in family and cultural 
contexts. Cross-referenced as CN 447/FT 447. Three 
credits. 

PY 448 History & Systems in Psychology 

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to 
various systems of thought in psychology and to an his- 
torical perspective on the development of the field. The 
course uses an approach that covers major historical 
figures, relevant themes, and schools of psychology. 
The course relies upon internet-based resources, 
library work, readings, and class discussion to convey 
this body of knowledge. Three credits. 

PY 449 Introduction to Clinical Child 
Neuropsychology 

This course introduces students to brain structure, 
development, and function as the child grows to adult- 
hood. Discussion topics include cognitive, academic, 
and behavioral sequelae of commonly encountered 
neuropathologies of childhood and adolescence, with 
case illustrations. Because of the emphasis placed 
on educational outcomes of neuropathology, the course 
addresses dyslexia, attention deficit disorder, and 
non-verbal learning disability. (Prerequisites: PY 538, 
PY 540) Three credits. 




PY 450 Theories of Child Psychotherapy 

This course introduces the major models of individual 
and group child psychotherapies, emphasizing the the- 
oretical bases, research support, and differential value 
of current treatment modalities. Topics include specific 
child psychotherapies such as play therapy, behavior 
therapy, parent training, chemotherapy, and family ther- 
apy; and the ethics, rights, and confidentiality of child 
evaluation and treatment. Demonstrations incorporate a 
variety of actual case materials. Three credits. 

PY 471 Effective Interviewing 

This course trains individuals whose work requires a 
high skill level in communication. The course empha- 
sizes defining the goals of the interview and the best 
means for achieving these goals, attending to overt and 
covert language and non-language messages, and 
dealing with the emotional dimensions of the interview. 
Students learn and experiment with a variety of inter- 
views in different contexts. Three credits. 

PY 475 Program Evaluation 

This course focuses on concepts and principles in 
performing evaluations of psychological and social 
programs. Evaluations are an amalgam of political and 
scientific perspectives that require numerous skills and 
talents. A number of topics and models of evaluation are 
presented. However, no two evaluations are alike. 
Therefore, solid training in methodology and technical 
techniques is imperative for performing evaluations. 
The objectives of this course are to develop skills in 
designing evaluations, to develop survey instruments, 
to develop proposals, and to communicate evaluation 
results. In each of these areas, ethical issues will be 
addressed. Quantitative methods will be emphasized, 
but qualitative approaches will be presented. 
(Prerequisites: PY 433. PY 571). Three credits. 



48 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



PY 530 Behavior Therapy 

This introductory course on the origins, assumptions, 
learning theories, and techniques of behavior therapies 
focuses on respondent and operant therapies, while 
integrating some recent methodologies such as ration- 
al-emotive and cognitive therapies. (Prerequisites: 
PY 435, PY 436) Three credits. 

PY 534 Theories of Learning 

This course considers, in detail, the conditions of 
human learning found in the principal schools of 
psychology on the contemporary scene. Students 
investigate other theories for individual reports. Cross- 
referenced as ED 534. Three credits. 

PY 535 Collaborative Consultation 

Designed to give students knowledge and consultation 
skills, this course presents consultation as a collabora- 
tive problem-solving process that is empowering and 
prevention-oriented. The course focuses on mental 
health consultation as described by Gerald Caplan. 
Students learn the major models of consultation, the 
generic stages of consultation, and four levels of con- 
sultation service. The course also addresses practice 
issues, such as consultee resistance, consultee per- 
spective, and consultant self-awareness. The course 
includes a practicum component in which students con- 
sult with a teacher at a school site once a week for 
approximately 10 weeks, beginning with the fifth week 
of class. (Prerequisites: PY 430. PY 548) Three credits. 

PY 536 Educational and Psychological Testing 

This course examines, in depth, the basic concepts and 
principles of psychological and educational assess- 
ment, including issues related to the assessment of 
special and diverse populations. The course provides 
the conceptual foundation for subsequent courses that 
train students how to do assessments and emphasizes 
the ethical practice of assessment. Three credits. 

PY 538 Educational and Psychological 
Assessment 

Students learn the background and principles of indi- 
vidual assessment techniques. The course considers 
the special problems of psychodiagnostic testing of cul- 
turally diverse and LEP children, with a major emphasis 
on the administration, scoring, interpretation, and 
reporting of cognitive and achievement tests. 
(Prerequisite: completion of all M.A. degree require- 
ments) Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

PY 540 Projective Techniques 

This first course in a series focusing on the nature and 
use of projective tests, develops in students a familiari- 
ty and basic ability to administer projective tests as 
part of a psychological assessment. The course focus- 
es on developing basic skills in the use of human figure 
drawings (DAP, HTP and others), the Thematic 
Apperception Test, sentence completion tests, and 
other selected instruments, and examines the use and 
scoring of the Rorschach technique. Students practice 
administration, interpretation, and basic report writing 
using these tools. (Prerequisite: completion of all M.A. 
degree requirements) Lab fee: S45. Three credits. 




PY 544 Integrated Assessment 

For school psychology majors only, this is the third and 
final course in the advanced study of applied psychoe- 
ducational assessment. Designed for graduate students 
who are in the final stages of preparing for on-site 
professional assessment, this course focuses on con- 
tinuing instruction in the administration and interpreta- 
tion of various assessment techniques, emphasizing 
cognitive measures, academic assessment, academic 
achievement tests, and projective techniques, as well 
as psychological report-writing that integrates all 
assessment data into clear, accurate, written psycho- 
logical reports. The course also stresses cultural and 
ethical competence in order to meet the need to 
synthesize and integrate assessment data into compre- 
hensive, non-biased psychological evaluations of chil- 
dren and youth. Students administer comprehensive 
psychoeducational batteries within a school or agency 
in preparation for their internship in school psychology. 
(Prerequisites: PY 538. PY 540) Three credits. 

PY 545 Designing and Developing Training 
Programs 

Designed for prospective trainers, training specialists, 
personnel generalists, or line personnel in business and 
industry, this course focuses on designing and develop- 
ing training programs for administrative professionals, 
management employees, and school personnel. 
Course assignments provide individualization and allow 
content to be tailored to participant needs and working 
environments. (Prerequisites: PY 420. PY 435) Cross- 
referenced as MD 545. Three credits. 

PY 548 Psychotherapeutic Techniques for 
School-Age Youth 

This course provides school psychology, school coun- 
selor, and social work students with a first exposure to 
psychotherapeutic techniques. Topics include the pur- 
poses and rationale for such techniques, selection of 
appropriate methodologies, ethical considerations, and 
practice skills. (Prerequisites: PY 430, PY 435. PY 438. 
PY 446) Three credits. 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



49 



PY 571 Research in Psychology 

This course emphasizes developing a critical under- 
standing of the essential issues involved in designing, 
conducting, and reporting the results of psychological 
research. It provides the foundation necessary for more 
advanced courses in research design and data 
analysis or for developing a master's thesis proposal. 
(Prerequisite: PY 433) Three credits. 

PY 575 Short-Term Psychotherapy 

This advanced course covers the diverse approaches 
used in time-limited psychotherapeutic interventions. 
Designed for advanced students and clinical profes- 
sionals in the community, the course covers a variety of 
perspectives, including systemic, psychodynamic, 
behavioral, and phenomemological approaches used in 
short-term interventions. (Prerequisites: PY 435, PY 
438, PY 446, and permission of advisor) Three credits. 

PY 576 Field Work in Child Study I 

This course supports students taking the first semester 
of their school psychology fieldwork practica require- 
ment. Taken concurrently with PY 544, this course 
primarily provides opportunities to gain practice and 
facility in testing and report writing. Students gain addi- 
tional practice in individual and group counseling, 
behavior modification, and interviewing skills. Students 
take this course during the spring semester. 
(Prerequisite: permission of instructor) Three credits. 

PY 577 Field Work in Child Study II 

This course supports students during the summer term 
of the school psychology fieldwork practica require- 
ment. Students placed in a mental health setting con- 
tinue to gain facility in individual and group counseling, 
behavior modification, and interviewing. Students take 
this course the summer before internship. (Prerequisite: 
PY 576) Three credits. 

PY 578 Field Work in Applied Psychology 

Advanced students matriculated in the industrial/ 
organizational/ personnel track undertake approved, 
supervised fieldwork in an area related to their profes- 
sional interests. Course requirements include a site 
supervisor and a faculty supervisor for each student, 
and a fieldwork placement that involves at least 20 days 
of on-site experience. (Prerequisites: completion of 
21 credits in psychology including PY 433 and PY 435, 
and approval of advisor. IOP track students also must 
have completed PY 420, PY 545, PY 406, and PY 571) 
Three credits. 

PY 594 Seminar in Applied and Industrial/ 
Organizational Psychology 

The culminating experience for students preparing for 
roles in organizations in human resources, industrial/ 
occupational psychology, or consulting, this seminar for 
students in the IOP track examines the issues of role 
definition, professional responsibilities, ethics, confiden- 
tiality, and professional communications. (Prerequisite: 
completion of 21 credits in psychology) Three credits. 



PY 595 Independent Study in Psychology 

Students conduct individual projects in consultation with 
a faculty member from the Department of Psychology 
and Special Education. (Prerequisite: approval of facul- 
ty advisor) Three credits. 

PY 596 Master's Thesis in Psychology 

Students matriculated in school psychology engage in a 
master's thesis project as an alternative to taking the 
master's comprehensive exam. The student's project 
must demonstrate an advanced, sophisticated knowl- 
edge of psychology and be considered a contribution to 
the field. Activities in the development of the thesis 
include an initial outline of the project, proposal (includ- 
ing a review of the related literature and proposed the- 
sis), and final report. Students submit proposals in the 
semester preceding registration for this thesis course 
and may register only during the normal registration 
period preceding each semester. (Prerequisites: 
PY 433, PY 571 or a prior course in research design, 
approval of the student's advisor, and agreement of a 
psychology faculty member to serve as thesis advisor) 
Three credits. 

PY 597 Seminar in Psychology 

The culminating experience for students preparing for 
roles in settings where graduate students synthesize 
their psychological knowledge and skill, this seminar for 
students in the human services and foundations track 
examines the issues of role definition, professional 
responsibility, ethics, confidentiality, and professional 
communications. (Prerequisite: completion of 21 credits 
in psychology) Three credits. 

PY 598 Internship in School Psychology I 

This course provides weekly supervision and support at 
the University for students during the fall semester of 
the school psychology internship. The Connecticut 
Certification Bureau requires an internship experience 
"consisting of 10 school months or its equivalent in a 
period not to exceed 20 school months, of supervised 
experience in a school setting under the supervision of 
a certified school psychologist, the local school system, 
and the preparing institution." This internship allows stu- 
dents to integrate the skills they have acquired in the 
program, build confidence using those skills, and devel- 
op a sense of professional identity. The course stresses 
a tripartite approach to school psychology, with equal 
emphasis on assessment, direct intervention, and con- 
sultation. (Prerequisite: all course work and approval of 
program coordinator) Three credits. 

PY 599 Internship in School Psychology II 

This course provides weekly supervision and support at 
the University for students during the spring semester 
of the school psychology internship. (Prerequisite: 
PY 598) Three credits. 



50 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 




Special Education 



Special education has, as its primary objective, the 
education and training of professional educators to 
serve children and youth who have exceptional 
challenges and require specialized support through 
educational, social, cognitive, rehabilitative, and/or 
behavioral management approaches to attain their 
maximum learning potential. In line with this primary 
objective, special education sees its role as contributing 
leadership in the areas of theory; assessment; under- 
standing differences among children and youth with 
disabilities; the development and implementation of 
curriculum and intervention strategies; the improvement 
of teacher-teacher, teacher-child, and teacher-parent 
relationships; and the integration of special education 
into total school programs. 

Including the master of arts degree and the certificate of 
advanced study programs (please note that the certifi- 
cate of advanced study will not be admitting students 
during this academic year while the program is being 
reviewed), graduate students may choose one of 
several sequences of study leading to certification that 
provide the preparation required by the Connecticut 
Board of Higher Education, the Connecticut Board of 
Education, and the Council for Exceptional Children. 
They may pursue a program leading to a Connecticut 
Initial Educator Certificate in teaching children and 
youth with disabilities in grades K through 12 
(Comprehensive Special Education endorsement), or a 
cross-endorsement certificate in comprehensive special 
education when certification in classroom teaching has 
already been earned. Students also may elect a con- 
centration leading to certification as a special education 
consulting teacher, bilingual special educator, or as an 
educator of persons identified as gifted and/or talented. 

In view of the essential responsibility of the program to 
assure the protection of the healthy development of 



children and youth served by special educators, the fac- 
ulty reserve the right to discontinue the program of any 
student, at any time during their program, whose aca- 
demic performance is marginal, whose comprehensive 
examination results are not rated as passing, or whose 
personal qualities are deemed not appropriate to the 
field. Such a student may be denied recommendation 
for certification. In addition, the Disposition Statement 
presented on page 23 is applicable to the special edu- 
cation programs as it is to all programs offered by the 
Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions. 



Admission to the Special Education Program 

The special education program admits twice a year. The 
deadlines for submitting a formal application and all 
supporting documentation are Feb. 1 for fall admission 
and Oct. 1 for spring admission. 

A group or individual interview with faculty members is 
required for admission to the Special Education pro- 
gram. The interview is intended to clarify the applicant's 
understanding of the program and the profession, 
and to evaluate the applicant's potential success as a 
student. After admission, each student is required to 
meet with a faculty advisor to outline a planned program 
of study. 



Requirements for the M.A. and C.A.S. 

The M.A. and C.A.S. programs in special education are 
individually planned according to each student's needs, 
interests, and background. The M.A. requires comple- 
tion of a minimum of 33 credits; the C.A.S. requires a 
minimum of 30 credits. 

Once a sequence of study is identified, the following are 
the requirements for the M.A. and C.A.S.: 

M.A. - 33 credits must include: 



ED 429 
CN433 
OR 
ED 441 



Philosophical Foundations of Education 
Multicultural Issues in Counseling 



Teaching and Learning Within 
Multicultural Contexts of Education 
SE 599 Seminar in Special Education 
Successful completion of the comprehensive exam- 
ination 
Of the 33 credits. 24 must be in special education 



C.A.S. - For this academic year, the CAS program is 
under review and will not be admitting students. 



Certification Requirements 

The certification program in comprehensive special 
education at Fairfield University is sequentially organ- 
ized across categories, providing participants with a 
frame of reference for evaluating the learning strengths 
and weaknesses of each child and, therefore, a basis 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



51 



from which to derive a prescriptive curriculum for the 
student with disabilities. 

The planned professional comprehensive program in 
special education is presented according to the format 
of Connecticut certification law and includes courses in 
the following areas: 

1. Psychoeducational theory and development of 
children with disabilities 

Developmental growth from infancy to adulthood is 
a baseline against which children with disabilities 
are viewed. Various theories pertaining to areas of 
disability are also presented and explored. 

2. Diagnosis of children and youth with disabilities 

Graduate students possessing developmental 
information and theoretical foundations can view 
each child with a disability against this background 
and thereby assess developmental strengths and 
weaknesses, and identify disabling conditions. 

3. Program planning and education of children and 
youth with disabilities 

Courses survey, analyze, and evaluate programs 
available for children with disabilities. Theory, devel- 
opment, diagnostic procedures, curricula, and 
methods are used as the baseline for comparison 
and for the development of individualized education 
plans designed to meet each student's needs. 

4. Curriculum and methods of teaching children 
and youth with disabilities 

The teaching process, although based upon sound 
diagnosis and expert knowledge of developmental 
sequences of education, must deal with each child's 
unique ways of functioning. The teacher cannot 
proceed without knowledge of the child's style of 
learning, tolerance for anxiety, attention, pace of 
cognitive processing, capacity for organization, and 
capability for developing appropriate relationships. 

Opportunity is provided within the special education 
program for future professional educators to be 
exposed to such variables. The future professional 
educator is expected to learn to observe children, to 
understand them, and to modify programs and 
plans to address the variables, as well as be able to 
shift gears, shift areas, and use several alternative 
approaches to achieve the same end goal. 

5. Practica in Special Education 

The practica assignments are designed to provide 
opportunities for the graduate student to engage in 
professional practice as a special education teacher 
under the supervision of University, school, and 
educational agency personnel. The experience 
offers the graduate student exposure in various 
settings to observe, evaluate, plan, instruct, and 
interact with pupils having special learning needs 
and challenging behaviors. Practica requirements 
are detailed in the Special Education Program 
Student Teaching Handbook. Placements are coor- 
dinated through the director of student teaching 
placements. An application for student teaching 
must be submitted to the director of student teach- 



ing placements in the semester prior to beginning 
the first practicum. Students work with a minimum of 
two different exceptionality categories and typically 
have experiences at two different grade levels. 

6. Course plans and institutional endorsement 

Special education course planning is in concert with 
the student's advisor. 

The certification regulations in effect at the time of appli- 
cation for Connecticut certification must be met for the 
University to issue an institutional endorsement. 



Initial Educator Certification 
Sequence of Courses 

The following list of courses is designed to reflect the 
current plan of study required for Connecticut certifica- 
tion as an initial educator in comprehensive special 
education (48 credits). 

To be considered for an initial certificate and/or to 
receive an institutional endorsement from the 
Connecticut Department of Education, a student must 
successfully complete all coursework in the planned 
program as well as pass all PRAXIS assessments 
required by the state for the intended certification. 

CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

OR 
ED 441 Teaching and Learning Within Multicultural 

Contexts of Education 
MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 
SE 403 Psychoeducational Issues in Education 
SE 411 Introduction to Individuals with Intellectual 

Disabilities 
SE 413 Theories of and Introduction to Learning 

Disabilities 
SE 417 Introduction to Children and Youth with 

Emotional Disturbances 
SE 429 Developmental and Remedial Reading and 

Language Arts 
SE 432 Management Techniques in Special 

Education 
SE 436 Administration of Educational Tests 
SE 441 Parents and Families of Individuals with 

Disabilities 
SE 534 Skill Development for Individual 

Educational Plans 
SE 537 Curriculum and Methods for Students with 

Mild to Moderate Disabilities 
SE 550 Collaboration and Consultation for the 

Special Educator 
SE 561 Diagnostic Procedures in Special Education 
SE 593 Student Teaching in Special Education 

(six credits) 

Note: Student teaching credits cannot be used to fulfill 
M.A. or C.A.S. degree requirements. Specific student 
teaching requirements for the initial certificate in special 
education are designed to meet state regulations, 
including use of a trained cooperating teacher. 



52 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



Cross-Endorsement Certification in Special 
Education 

Only students holding a teaching certificate in another 
state-approved area are eligible for the cross- 
endorsement in special education. 

The following is a list of courses that the Special 
Education program requires for Connecticut certification 
in comprehensive special education under the cross- 
endorsement program (42 credits). 

CN 433 Multicultural Issues in Counseling 

OR 
ED 441 Teaching and Learning within Multicultural 

Contexts of Education 
MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 
SE 403 Psychoeducational Issues in Special 

Education 
SE 411 Introduction to Individuals with Intellectual 

Disabilities 
SE 413 Theories of and Introduction to Learning 

Disabilities 
SE 417 Introduction to Children and Youth with 

Emotional Disturbances 
SE 429 Developmental and Remedial Reading and 

Language Arts 
SE 432 Management Techniques in Special 

Education 
SE 436 Administration of Educational Tests 
SE 441 Parents and Families of Individuals with 

Disabilities 
SE 534 Skill Development for Individual 

Educational Plans 
SE 561 Diagnostic Procedures in Special Education 
SE 591 Practicum in Special Education 
SE 592 Practicum in Special Education 



Bilingual Special Education 

Applicants must demonstrate proficiency in English and 
either Spanish or Portuguese. A program of studies 
includes the following courses, some of which may be 
substituted at the discretion of the coordinator if it meets 
state and University standards and adheres to Project 
BiSEP requirements. 

For full descriptions of courses, refer to the TESOL. 
Foreign Language, and Bilingual/Multicultural 
Education section for SL courses and to the Special 
Education section for SE courses. 

ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 

OR 
ED 534 Theories of Learning 
MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 
SE 403 Psychoeducational Issues in Special 

Education 
SE 411 Introduction to Individuals with Intellectual 

Disabilities 
SE 413 Theories of and Introduction to Learning 

Disabilities 



SE 417 Introduction to Children and Youth with 

Emotional Disturbances 
SE 429 Developmental and Remedial Reading and 

Language Arts 
SE 432 Management Techniques in Special 

Education 
SE 436 Administration of Educational Tests 
SE 441 Parents and Families of Individuals with 

Disabilities 
SE 534 Skill Development for Individualized 

Educational Plans 
SE 537 Curriculum and Methods for Students with 

Mild to Moderate Disabilities 
SE 550 Collaboration and Consultation for the 

Special Educator 
SE 561 Diagnostic Procedures in Special Education 

of Youth with Disabilities 
SE 591 Practicum in Special Education I and 
SE 592 Practicum in Special Education II or 
SE 593 Student Teaching in Special Education 

Additionally, students must take a minimum of one SL 
course in each of five or six different content areas, 
depending on whether the TESOL or the bilingual 
education endorsement is being pursued. These 
courses are selected with the approval of the student's 
advisor. Students are encouraged to access the 
Connecticut State Department of Education website for 
updates to course requirements for these endorse- 
ments and to ensure that they have successfully 
completed all requirements. Listed below are examples 
of some of the courses generally taken to fulfill the bilin- 
gual cross-endorsement component of the Bilingual 
Special Education program. TESOL cross-endorsement 
requires additional, and perhaps, different courses than 
those listed below. 

SL 423 Principles of Bilingualism 

SL 426 Methods and Materials in Bilingual 

Programs 
SL 436 Methods and Materials for Second 

Language Teaching 
SL 441 Teaching and Learning Within Multicultural 

Contexts of Education 
SL 451 Content Area Instruction in Bilingual/ESL 

Classrooms 
SL 527 Testing and Assessment in Foreign 

Languages 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



53 



Course Descriptions 

SE 403 Psychoeducational Issues in 
Special Education 

Designed to introduce special educators, school psy- 
chologists, and other related pupil service providers to 
a variety of complex issues and problems that affect 
children and youth with exceptional learning needs, 
this course emphasizes themes such as public laws, 
psychological planning and placement of children and 
youth, inclusive education, multicultural and family 
issues, ethics and professional standards, and stres- 
sors affecting professional performance. Three credits. 

SE 405 Exceptional Learners in the Mainstream 

This course familiarizes the mainstream professional 
with the special learning needs of children and youth 
with mental retardation, learning disabilities, emotional 
disturbances, severe disabilities, multiple disabilities, 
and those who are gifted and talented. Topics include 
methods of identifying and working effectively with chil- 
dren and youth with special learning needs in the regu- 
lar classroom; the roles and responsibilities of coun- 
selors, psychologists, educators, and ancillary person- 
nel as members of a multidisciplinary team in planning 
educational services for exceptional learners; and laws 
that impact on assessment, placement, parent and stu- 
dent rights, and support services. This course may 
require a fieldwork component as part of the evaluation 
process. Cross-referenced as SE 430. Three credits. 

SE 411 Introduction to Individuals with 
Intellectual Disabilities 

Students develop an understanding and working 
knowledge of mental retardation in this course, which 
emphasizes the definitional, medical, psychosocial, and 
educational issues that affect the lives of people who 
have been diagnosed as being mentally retarded. This 
course may require a fieldwork component as part of 
the evaluation process. Formerly: Introduction to Mental 
Retardation. Three credits. 

SE 413 Theories of and Introduction to Learning 
Disabilities 

This course introduces students to the area of learning 
disabilities, exploring various theoretical constructs per- 
taining to numerous facets of the disorder (cognition, 
executive function, attention deficits, etc.) by examining 
their development and discussing the past and current 
issues about the definition. Students examine educa- 
tional and social emotional sequelae and implications of 
processing impairments using actual case evaluations. 
This course may require a fieldwork component as part 
of the evaluation process. Three credits. 

SE 417 Introduction to Children and Youth with 
Emotional Disturbances 

This course addresses emotional disturbance in chil- 
dren by comparing normal and atypical patterns of per- 
sonality growth from infancy through adolescence. 
Three credits. 



SE 419 Special Learners in the Bilingual/ESL 
Classroom 

Designed to familiarize bilingual and ESL teachers with 
the developmental learning needs of children and ado- 
lescents who are exceptional, this course examines the 
special learning needs of linguistically and culturally 
diverse children and adolescents in bilingual or ESL 
classrooms. Cross-referenced as SL419. Three credits. 

SE 429 Developmental and Remedial Reading 
and Language Arts 

This course delineates a conceptual framework of read- 
ing and language arts as being not only related to 
decoding, syntax, and comprehension, but also its 
relationship to the associated constructs of executive 
functions, working memory, and attention. Students 
explore current research regarding reading, language 
development, and associated constructs; examine case 
studies; become familiar with specific reading and affili- 
ated assessment instruments; practice administering 
various instruments; examine and use various reading 
programs currently available; become acquainted with 
assistive, interactive technological tools; and explore 
specific websites. Three credits 

SE 430 Special Learners in the Regular 
Classroom 

This course familiarizes school personnel with the 
learning needs of children and youth who have mental 
retardation, learning disabilities, emotional distur- 
bances, and/or who are gifted and talented. The course 
also examines methods of identifying and working 
effectively with children and youth with disabilities in 
inclusive settings. The course may require a fieldwork 
component as part of the evaluation process. Cross- 
referenced as SE 405. Three credits. 

SE 432 Management Techniques in Special 
Education 

Designed to offer training in techniques for improving 
the academic and social behavior of students with 
behavior problems, this course, which is open to those 
who work with people to effect positive behavioral 
change, includes such topics as behavioral observation 
and analysis, task analysis, intervention strategies, and 
behavior change measurement and recording. Three 
credits. 

SE 436 Administration of Educational Tests 

This course includes selection, administration, scoring, 
and interpretation of individually administered cognitive 
processing and academic achievement diagnostic 
instruments. Three credits. 

SE 441 Parents and Families of Individuals with 
Disabilities 

This course introduces students to the dynamic family 
network of persons with disabilities, emphasizing the 
psychosocial stages of family structure and systemic 
interaction. Topics include family systems theories and 
their clinical applications; the grief process; family cop- 
ing strategies; and significant professional issues for 
family therapists, counselors, special educators, psy- 



54 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



chologists, nurses, and other human service personnel. 
Three credits. 

SE 534 Skill Development for Individualized 
Educational Plans 

This course is designed to develop the skills necessary 
for creating comprehensive diagnostic educational 
profiles for students with identified learning needs and 
utilizes comprehensive cognitive processing and aca- 
demic achievement evaluations as a foundation. A 
non-categorical approach is utilized and topics of 
exploration include: the identification of patterns of 
strengths and weaknesses and resultant development 
of goals and objectives; determination of appropriate 
methodologies, programs, and strategies; selection and 
organizational sequence of materials; and considera- 
tion of various educational environments in which serv- 
ices may be provided. (Prerequisites: SE 413, SE 561; 
Pre- or co-requisite: SE 429). Three credits. 

SE 537 Curriculum and Methods for Students 
with Mild to Moderate Disabilities 

This course presents curriculum and methods for use 
with students having mild to moderate disabilities in 
learning. (Prerequisites: SE 411, SE 413, SE 417) 
Three credits. 

SE 540 C.A.S. Practicum 

Candidates complete a project involving fieldwork 
and/or research in special education. This course can- 
not be used to fulfill certification requirements. 
(Prerequisite: permission of the instructor) Three cred- 
its. 

SE 550 Collaboration and Consultation for the 
Special Educator 

This course presents an overview of models that sup- 
port the role of the consulting teacher as a facilitator 
and collaborator in the process of service delivery to 
children, youth, and young adults with special learning 
needs. Major topics include the application of consulta- 
tion models to systems change, in-service education, 
and classroom consultation. Formerly The Consulting 
Teacher: An Introduction. Three credits. 

SE 561 Diagnostic Procedures in Special 
Education of Youth with Disabilities 

This course provides students with detailed informa- 
tion/data as it pertains to interpreting and understanding 
varied diagnostic procedures by using various models 
of interpretation and theoretical foundations. Also, the 
course provides a foundation for understanding the 
strengths and weaknesses of students undergoing 
diagnostic evaluations. (Pre- or co-requisite: SE 413) 
Three credits. 

SE 591 and SE 592 Practica in Special Education 

Each of these three-credit courses consists of an expe- 
riential opportunity for students pursuing a cross- 
endorsement in special education. Each practica is indi- 
vidually designed to meet the student's needs and fulfill 
the certification requirement of working with at least two 
different disabilities. Practica requirements include 




seminar attendance in conjunction with the on-site 
experience and supervision. Students fulfilling the 
cross-endorsement in comprehensive special education 
confirm placements in conjunction with the student's 
University advisor and the Director of Student Teaching 
Placement. (Minimum prerequisites: Permission of the 
student's University advisor and successful completion 
of: SE 411, SE 413, SE 417, SE 429, SE 432, SE 436, 
SE 534, and SE 561. Students must notify their 
University advisor of their intent to start these courses in 
the semester prior to their anticipated practica place- 
ment.) Three credits per course; six credits for both 
courses. 

SE 593 Student Teaching in Special Education 

This six-credit course consists of a semester-long, 
fifteen-week, fulltime placement in a public school or 
an approved setting working with a BEST-trained coop- 
erating teacher who supervises the candidate pursuing 
an initial certificate in special education as he or she 
works with students identified with at least two different 
disabilities. Student teaching requirements include sem- 
inar attendance in conjunction the on-site experience 
and supervision. Students fulfilling the initial certificate 
in special education coordinate their site placements 
with their academic advisor and the Director of Student 
Teaching Placement. (Minimum prerequisites: 
Permission of the advisor and successful completion of: 
SE 411, 413, 417, 429, 432, 436, 534, 537, and 561. 
Students must notify their University advisor and the 
Director of Student Teaching Placement of their intent to 
start this course in the semester prior to their anticipat- 
ed student teaching experience.) Six credits 

SE 595 Independent Study in Special Education 

The course provides opportunities for advanced 
students to pursue their interests in diverse aspects of 
special education under the guidance of a faculty 
member. (Prerequisite: permission of the instructor) 
Three to six credits. 

SE 599 Seminar in Special Education 

This synthesizing seminar directs the student toward an 
in-depth study of special topics in the field, using a 
research-oriented approach. (Prerequisite: completion 
of 24 credits) Three credits. 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



55 



Educational Technology 

The Educational Technology program serves two main 
functions. First, it offers educational technology courses 
that satisfy the educational technology component 
needs in the Graduate School of Education and Allied 
Professions programs. Second, it offers a multi-track 
program for students interested in obtaining a master of 
arts degree or certificate of advanced study in the field 
of educational technology (please note that admission 
to the C.A.S. will be suspended for this academic year 
while it is under review). The program emphasizes the- 
ory, production, applications, and infusion of education- 
al technology in education. It explores the effects of 
information technologies on the learner, the education- 
al system, and society as a whole. 

Students in the program employ state-of-the-art facili- 
ties, including the University's information infrastructure, 
which uses fiber optics to the desktop. Equipment and 
facilities available to students include multimedia com- 
puter laboratories, color television studios, analog and 
digital video postproduction, digital- and still-picture 
cameras, portable video cameras and recorders, and a 
host of media equipment. 

Internships in television, multimedia production, and 
school media library are available to students majoring 
in educational technology. Required courses are out- 
lined below. Some courses may be substituted at the 
discretion of the department chairperson. 



Admission 

Admission to areas of concentration in the Educational 
Technology program is on a rolling basis. Passing or 
waiving Praxis I is required for formal admission to the 
School Media Specialist Certification area. 

Areas of concentration within the department are: 

1. School Media Specialist Certification 

2. Instructional Development 

3. Computers in Education 

4. Television Production 

5. Applied Educational Technology in Content Areas 

6. Free-Track 



School Media Specialist Certification 

Course requirements for school media specialist certifi- 
cation are: 

1 . Students holding a Connecticut educator certificate 
with at least one year of successful teaching must 
complete a minimum of 30 credits of approved 
educational technology and related courses. The 
advisor will plan an appropriate program of cours- 
es with each student. 

2. Students without an educator certificate who wish 
to earn initial educator certification must complete 
a minimum of 24 credits of approved educational 
technology and related courses and 24 credits 
from the following required pedagogy courses: 
ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 
ED 441 Teaching and Learning within 

Multicultural Contexts of Learning 
ED 442 Educational Psychology 
ED 465 Teaching Methods for Secondary School 

OR 
ED 565 Principles of Curriculum Development 

(with advisor approval for students with 

teaching experience) 
MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 
MD 581 Directed Observation and Supervised 

Student Teaching in Media 
MD 582 Student Teaching Seminar 
SE 405 Exceptional Learners in the Mainstream 

OR 
SE 430 Special Learners in the Regular 

Classroom 

To be considered an initial certification program com- 
pleter and/or to receive an institutional endorsement 
when applying for initial educator certification from the 
Connecticut Department of Education, a student must 
have completed all coursework in the planned program 
as well as all PRAXIS assessments required by the 
state for the intended certification. 

Considering the role of the school media specialist in 
the school and community, any student whose relevant 
academic productivity is marginal or inadequate, who 
does not embody a socially responsible professional 
disposition, or who demonstrates unsuitable personal 
qualities, will not be recommended for matriculation, 
continuation in the program, student teaching place- 
ment, or state certification. In addition, the Disposition 
Statement presented on page 23 is applicable to this 
program as it is to all programs in the Graduate School 
of Education and Allied Professions. 



56 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



Requirements for the M.A. 

The major in educational technology requires 33 credits 
with at least 24 credit hours in educational technology 
and approved related courses offered by other depart- 
ments in the School. 

1. Complete 12 credits from the following courses: 
ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 
ED 441 Teaching and Learning within 

Multicultural Contexts of Learning 
MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 
MD 499 Research in Educational Technology I 

OR 
CS 499 Research in Educational Technology I 

or one of the following: 
MD 590 Internship in School Media 
MD 591 Internship in TV Production 
MD 592 Internship in Multimedia Production 

2. Complete 21 credits in one of the areas of 
specialization listed below. 

3. Pass the comprehensive examination. 



Areas of Specialization 
School Media Specialist 

1. Required courses 

MD 403 The School Library 
MD 405 School Library Automation 
MD 406 Introduction to Reference 
AND one of the following: 

EN 404 Children's Literature 
EN 405 Literature for Young Adults 
EN 406 Multicultural Literature K-8 
MD 425 History of Motion Pictures in the 

Western World 
MD 433 Critical Viewing of Television and 
Children's Safety on Mass Media 
and the Internet 

2. Choice of nine credits from the following: 

CS 429 The World Wide Web in Education and 

in Training 
CS 442 Design and Development of Multimedia 

Programs 
MD410 Sounds of Learning 
MD411 Desktop Publishing Design and 

Applications: Part I 
MD 425 History of Motion Pictures in the 

Western World 
MD 431 Video Production I 
MD 433 Critical Viewing of Television and 

Children's Safety on Mass Media and 

the Internet 
MD 443 Integrating Instructional Technologies in 

Elementary School Education 
MD 452 Integrating Technology in Content Areas: 

Language Arts and Social Studies 
MD 460 Principles of Instructional Development 
MD 467 Introduction to Networking: Concepts 

and Applications 
MD 469 Establishing Worldwide Learning 

Communities through Technology 



MD 470 Distance Teaching in the Information Age 
MD 475 Empowering Computers for Best 

Educational Practice 
MD 490 Achieving an Interdisciplinary Approach 

to Teaching Through Technology 
MD 545 Designing and Developing Training 

Programs 

Instructional Development 

1 . Required course 

MD 460 Principles of Instructional Development 

2. Choice of 18 credits from the following: 

CS 429 The World Wide Web in Education and 

in Training 
ED 565 Principles of Curriculum Development 

and Evaluation 
One of the following three: 

EN 404 Children's Literature 
EN 405 Literature for Young Adults 
EN 406 Multicultural Literature K-8 
MD410 Sounds of Learning 
MD411 Desktop Publishing Design and 

Applications: Part I 
MD 420 Writing for the Visual Media 
MD 431 Video Production I 
MD 442 Design and Development of Multimedia 

Programs 
MD 469 Establishing Worldwide Learning 

Communities through Technology 
MD 470 Distance Teaching in the Information Age 
MD 475 Empowering Computers for Best 

Educational Practice 
MD 490 Achieving an Interdisciplinary Approach 

to Teaching Through Technology 
MD 531 Video Production II 
MD 545 Designing and Developing Training 

Programs 

Computers in Education 

1. Required course 

CS 438 Principles of Instructional Development 

2. Choice of 18 credits from the following: 

CS 408 Introduction to Computers in Writing 
CS 429 The World Wide Web in Education and 

in Training 
CS 442 Design and Development of Multimedia 

Programs 
CS 443 Integrating Instructional Technologies in 

Elementary School Education 
CS 452 Integrating Technology in Content Areas: 

Language Arts and Social Studies 
CS 467 Introduction to Networking: Concepts 

and Applications 
CS 469 Establishing Worldwide Learning 

Communities through Technology 
CS 475 Empowering Computers for Best 

Educational Practice 
CS 490 Achieving an Interdisciplinary Approach 

to Teaching Through Technology 
MD 405 School Library Automation 
MD 470 Distance Teaching in the Information Age 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



57 



Television Production 

Choice of 21 credits from the following: 

CS 429 The World Wide Web in Education and 

in Training 
MD410 Sounds of Learning 
MD 411 Desktop Publishing Design and 

Applications: Part I 
MD 425 History of Motion Pictures in the 

Western World 
MD 431 Video Production I 
MD 433 Critical Viewing of Television and 

Children's Safety on Mass Media 

and the Internet 
MD 442 Design and Development of Multimedia 

Programs 
MD 460 Principles of Instructional Development 
MD 469 Establishing Worldwide Learning 

Communities through Technology 
MD 470 Distance Teaching in the Information Age 
MD 531 Video Production II 
MD 545 Designing and Developing Training 

Programs 
MD 490 Achieving an Interdisciplinary Approach 

to Teaching Through Technology 
PY 471 Effective Interviewing 

Applied Educational Technology in Content Areas 

Choice of 21 credits from the following: 

CS 408 Introduction to Computers in Writing 
CS 429 The World Wide Web in Education and 

in Training 
MD 403 The School Library 
MD410 Sounds of Learning 
MD411 Desktop Publishing Design and 

Applications: Part I 
MD 431 Video Production I 
MD 433 Critical Viewing of Television and 

Children's Safety on Mass Media 

and the Internet 
MD 442 Design and Development of Multimedia 

Programs 
MD 443 Integrating Instructional Technologies in 

Elementary School Education 
MD 452 Integrating Technology in Content Areas: 

Language Arts and Social Studies 
MD 460 Principles of Instructional Development 
MD 469 Establishing Worldwide Learning 

Communities through Technology 
MD 470 Distance Education in the Information Age 
MD 475 Empowering Computers for Best 

Educational Practice 
MD 490 Achieving an Interdisciplinary Approach 

to Teaching Through Technology 

Free-Track 

The program is designed by the student in consultation 
with the advisor and is based on the student's 
previous experience and intended career goals. To be 
considered an educational technology major, a student 
must accumulate 24 credits in educational technology 
and approved media-related courses. 



Requirements for the C.A.S. 

Please note that the CAS curriculum is undergoing 
review and consequently not admitting students for this 
academic year. 

Normally, students accepted in the program must com- 
plete a minimum of 30 credits of approved coursework 
beyond the master's degree. 



Required courses 

ED 534 Theories of Learning OR similar course 
(with permission of department chair) 

ED 540 Ethics for Educators 

MD 599 Research in Educational Technology II 
OR 

CS 599 Research in Educational Technology II 

Other courses must be in the selected area of special- 
ized study noted below. 



Areas of Specialization 
School Media Specialist 

Applicants must have an M.A. degree in an area of edu- 
cational technology other than school media specialist. 
Requirements for state certification are considered in 
planning a program leading to certification and the com- 
pletion of the requirements for the Certificate of 
Advanced Studies. Depending on the background of 
the student and past experience, a program of study is 
developed with the advisor. 

Instructional Development 

Open for candidates who have their master's degree in 
an area of educational technology other than instruc- 
tional development. Applicants have a choice of seven 
courses from the instructional development cluster. 

Computers in Education 

Open for candidates who have their master's degree in 
an area of educational technology other than computers 
in education. Applicants have a choice of seven cours- 
es from the computers in education cluster. 

Television Production 

Open for candidates who have their master's degree in 
an area of educational technology other than television 
production. Applicants have a choice of seven courses 
from the television production cluster. 

Applied Educational Technology in Content Areas 

Open for candidates who have their master's degree in 
an area of educational technology other than applied 
educational technology in content areas. Applicants 
have a choice of seven courses from the applied edu- 
cational technology in content areas cluster. 

Free-Track 

The program is designed by the student in consultation 
with the advisor and is based on the student's previous 
experience and intended career goals. Students com- 
plete 21 credits. 



58 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



Course Descriptions 

CS 408 Introduction to Computers in Writing 

Has the computer altered our writing practices and the 
ways we teach writing? What does the computer hold 
for the future? Students examine these questions from 
several theoretical and practical viewpoints. Beginning 
with an examination of notions of test, literacy, and 
communications, the course reviews writing theory, writ- 
ing process, and types of electronic collaboration. 
Additional topics include hypertext and hypermedia; lit- 
eracy criticism; aspects of planning and running suc- 
cessful computerized programs; and the results writers 
of various ages and expertise levels - from emerging to 
accomplished, kindergarten through college - can 
expect from writing on computers. Lab fee: $45. Three 
credits. 

CS 429 The World Wide Web in Education 
and in Training 

Teachers learn to use the services and resources 
offered by the Internet and the World Wide Web. They 
study ways in which schools and training institutions 
use the Internet, becoming familiar with Internet-based 
resources that are of particular value to K-1 2 education. 
Participants also learn the basics of designing and 
developing school homepages. Lab fee: $45. Three 
credits. 

CS 438 Principles of Instructional Development 

This course covers the principles and application of 
systemic design of instruction in multimedia curricula 
design. Topics include designing, developing, and 
evaluating instructional materials; selecting media; 
conducting needs assessment and learner analysis; 
writing instructional objectives; and assessing learner 
performance. Students use role-playing to analyze, 
evaluate, and propose potential solutions to selected 
case studies. (Prerequisite: MD 400) Cross-referenced 
as MD 460. Three credits. 

CS 442 Design and Development of 
Multimedia Programs 

Students design interactive multimedia programs using 
Flash. The use of Flash in website design for business- 
es is on the rise and its use in education is catching up. 
Students will publish their production on the Web and 
save it on a CD-RW. (Prerequisite: MD 400) Cross- 
referenced as MD 442. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

CS 443 Integrating Instructional Technologies in 
Elementary School Education 

This course focuses on the applications of a variety 
of instructional technologies, including the Internet, 
spreadsheets, databases, graphic programs, and 
multimedia programs to structure effective learning 
environments for elementary education students. The 
course emphasizes reviewing available teachers' 
resources including lesson plans, collaborative projects. 
and cultural diversity projects. Cross-referenced as 
ED 443/MD 443. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 



CS 452 Integrating Technology in Content Areas: 
Language Arts and Social Studies 

This course addresses the infusion of conventional and 
new technologies in teaching language arts and social 
studies curricula. Participants study and assess the 
educational values of innovative teaching strategies 
that employ a broad range of instructional materials and 
resources. Based upon a sound theoretical framework, 
instructional models, and the best practices, partici- 
pants design and create units of instruction and lesson 
activities integrating technology resources, including 
audio, video, computer software, and Web-based 
resources. Participants also participate in online collab- 
orative learning experiences with the purpose of estab- 
lishing an ongoing community of learners for long-term 
collaboration. The course examines legal, ethical, and 
equity issues as they relate to the language arts and 
social studies classroom, and discusses concepts of 
universal access to curriculum and universal design to 
help individualize the inclusive classroom. Participants 
work toward creating an electronic portfolio that can be 
expanded upon completion of the course. Cross-refer- 
enced as ED 452/MD 452. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

CS 467 Introduction to Networking: 
Concepts and Applications 

This course examines the application of computer 
networking in schools to enhance communication, 
share ideas, and retrieve and send information. It 
addresses the basics of a computer network including 
computer network planning, client and network operat- 
ing systems, Microsoft Windows NT Server. Microsoft 
Windows Workstation, Microsoft Office installation and 
use, Internet access, Internet e-mail, and Web servers. 
(Prerequisites: minimum six credits in computers in 
education courses and permission of the chair) Cross- 
referenced as MD 467. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

CS 469 Establishing Worldwide Learning 
Communities Through Technology 

Worldwide developments continue to heighten aware- 
ness of the importance of linkages among peoples in 
different nations. When we consider our world from 
such a perspective, the need for understanding and 
education becomes glaringly apparent. Technologically 
connected learning communities around the globe 
occur through students forming partnerships to learn 
about each others' customs, languages, and cultures: 
teachers collaborating on teaching strategies and cur- 
riculum development: or administrators and policymak- 
ers exchanging views on educational issues. 
Participants in this course examine the instructional 
issues and concerns for connecting communities of 
learning worldwide along with the related technological 
tools and techniques. To complement classroom 
instruction, students apply course concepts via select 
online assignments. Cross-referenced as MD 469. Lab 
fee: $45. Three credits. 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



59 



CS 475 Empowering Computers for Best 
Educational Practices 

Society has positioned computers as an integral part of 
the educational process. This course considers the 
development of the computer as an agency for learning, 
the role of computers in today's educational settings, 
and methods that may be used to improve the function- 
ing of computers in learning. Course participants study 
documented computer technology practices and results 
useful in identifying strategic elements that can assist 
in creating best computing practices in a variety of edu- 
cational environments. The course addresses the issue 
of the digital divide and identifies viable strategies for 
assisting schools that lack necessary hardware, soft- 
ware, and staff development plans. Cross-referenced 
as MD 475. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

CS 490 Achieving an Interdisciplinary Approach 
to Teaching through Technology 

Achieving an interdisciplinary approach to teaching is a 
challenge facing many of today's educators. It is a set 
of complex tasks that involves integrating content 
across disciplines, good instructional design, effective 
planning, and creative pedagogical strategies while at 
the same time realizing educational equity among a 
diverse student population. Fortunately, technologies of 
instruction can help with the realization of these tasks. 
In preparation for the interdisciplinary challenge, teach- 
ers need exceptional instruction in the stages of inter- 
disciplinary curriculum development with technology. 
This course addresses the selection, use, modifica- 
tions, design, integration, and implementation of inter- 
disciplinary curricula using technology in a culturally 
diverse environment. It aims at helping the participants 
in the course to develop their understanding of the 
potential use of technologies of instruction in achieving 
an interdisciplinary cross-cultural approach to educa- 
tion. Cross-referenced as MD 490. Lab fee: $45.00. 
Three credits. 

CS 499 Research in Educational Technology I 

This course is open to M.A. students. (Prerequisite: 24 
credits in educational technology) Three credits. 

CS 590 Internship in Computers in Education 

Full-time students obtain firsthand experience in school 
computer technology. Credit by arrangement. 

CS 595 Independent Study in Computers 

Students undertake independent study in computers 
with a faculty member, submitting a proposal for inde- 
pendent study for consideration prior to course registra- 
tion. Three credits. 

CS 599 Research in Educational Technology II 

This course is open to C.A.S. students. (Prerequisite: 
21 credits in educational technology courses or with 
permission from the department chair) Three credits. 



MD 400 Introduction to Educational Technology 

This foundation course in our Educational Technology 
program develops student appreciation of the basic 
characteristics of the information age and how the tech- 
nologies of that age affect every life phase. Students 
learn to articulate a vision of educational reform in the 
information age; identify the primary goal(s) of that 
reform; and understand the potential applications of 
educational technology in enriching the education of 
every student. The course develops students' under- 
standing of and skills in using computers and informa- 
tion technologies, including the Internet, to design and 
implement effective learning environments. Other topics 
include CD-ROM applications in education, satellite 
communication in education, distance education, televi- 
sion in education, necessary conditions for effective use 
of technologies of instruction in schools, and qualifica- 
tions of technology-literate teachers and students. Lab 
fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 403 The School Library 

Participants examine the role of the school library in the 
teaching-learning process through such topics as 
recent trends in planning and using school libraries; 
remodeling as a means to enhance efficient use of 
existing libraries; future developments; and techniques 
for teaching elementary and secondary students to effi- 
ciently use the school library. Three credits. 

MD 405 School Library Automation 

This course provides students with the hands-on expe- 
riences needed to implement a circulation and catalog 
automation system in a library. Topics include barcod- 
ing, MARC records, retrospective conversion, catalog 
searching, and networking. Each student creates a fully 
functional circulation/catalog system, complete with 
overdue books, statistics reporting, reserve and tempo- 
rary items, and special collection groups. No previous 
computer or automation skills are required. Lab fee: 
$45. Three credits. 

MD 406 Introduction to Reference 

In this course, participants learn information retrieval 
techniques, Internet search strategies, and methods for 
teaching effective information retrieval to elementary 
and secondary school students using traditional and 
online references. Three credits. 

MD410 Sounds of Learning 

Students study basic principles of writing an audio pro- 
gram, developing children's listening skills, using radio 
and recorded materials in teaching, and using audio in 
computerized multimedia. They also review select 
audio teaching programs that emphasize individualized 
and group instruction. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 



60 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



MD 411 Desktop Publishing Design and 
Applications: Part I 

The production of effective instructional media relies 
heavily on a basic understanding of visual and audio 
design. By applying this knowledge, educators and 
business communicators increase the likelihood of 
impacting their audiences favorably. This course uses a 
number of production tools, including PageMaker and 
other publishing programs, to create originals that will 
be used to produce multimedia presentations, 35 mm 
slides, overhead transparencies, newsletters, and fliers. 
Participants lean to integrate desktop publishing into all 
instructional areas of K-12 education. Lab fee: $45. 
Three credits. 

MD 425 History of Motion Pictures 

This course examines the evolution of the motion pic- 
ture as a communication medium from its infancy to its 
present stage of development. Film fee: $45. Three 
credits. 

MD 431 Video Production I 

Using a single-camera videotape-recorder system, 
this course explores simple and creative production 
techniques and the use of television in education and 
training. Students also learn basic analog and digital 
video postproduction and have an opportunity to 
become familiar with multiple-camera systems using 
the University's color television studio. Lab fee: $45. 
Three credits. 

MD 433 Critical Viewing of Television and 
Children's Safety on Mass Media 
and the Internet 

Children without discriminating parents and teachers 
lack models for intelligent use of the television 
programming they view for long hours each day. Critical 
television viewing skills can, however, be taught. This 
course enhances adult understanding of television 
and participants' critical viewing skills, and presents 
methods and curricula for developing critical viewing 
skills in children and teenagers. The course also exam- 
ines issues of children's safety on the Internet, applying 
information about critical viewing of motion pictures and 
television to this issue. Three credits. 

MD 442 Design and Development of Multimedia 
Programs 

Students design interactive multimedia programs using 
Flash. The use of Flash in website design for business- 
es is on the rise and its use in education is catching up. 
Students publish their production on the Web and 
save it on a CD-RW. (Prerequisite: MD 400) Cross- 
referenced as CS 442. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 443 Integrating Instructional Technologies in 
Elementary School Education 

This course focuses on the application of a variety of 
instructional technologies including the Internet, 
spreadsheets, databases, graphic programs, and multi- 
media programs to structure effective learning environ- 
ments for elementary education students. The course 
also emphasizes reviewing available teachers' 
resources including lesson plans, collaborative projects, 



and cultural diversity projects. Cross-referenced as 
CS 443/ED 443. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 452 Integrating Technology in Content 

Areas: Language Arts and Social Studies 

This course addresses the infusion of conventional and 
new technologies in teaching language arts and social 
studies curricula. Participants study and assess the 
educational values of innovative teaching strategies 
that employ a broad range of instructional materials and 
resources. Based upon a sound theoretical framework, 
instructional models, and the best practices, partici- 
pants design and create units of instruction and lesson 
activities integrating technology resources, including 
audio, video, computer software, and Web-based 
resources. Participants also participate in online collab- 
orative learning experiences with the purpose of estab- 
lishing an ongoing community of learners for long-term 
collaboration. The course examines legal, ethical, and 
equity issues as they relate to the language arts and 
social studies classroom and discusses concepts of 
universal access to curriculum and universal design to 
help individualize instruction for all learners, particularly 
in the inclusive classroom. Participants work toward 
creating an electronic portfolio that can be expanded 
upon completion of the course. Cross-referenced as 
CS 452/ED 452. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 460 Principles of Instructional Development 

This course covers the principles and application of 
systemic design of instruction in multimedia curricula 
design. Topics include designing, developing, and 
evaluating instructional materials; selecting media; 
conducting needs assessment and learner analysis; 
writing instructional objectives: and assessing learner 
performance. Students use role-playing to analyze, 
evaluate, and propose potential solutions to selected 
case studies. (Prerequisite: MD 400) Cross-referenced 
as CS 438. Three credits. 

MD 467 Introduction to Networking: 
Concepts and Applications 

This course examines the application of computer net- 
working in schools to enhance communication, share 
ideas, and retrieve and send information. It addresses 
the basics of a computer network, including computer 
network planning, client and network operating sys- 
tems, Microsoft Windows NT Server, Microsoft 
Windows Workstation, Microsoft Office installation and 
use, Internet access, Internet e-mail, and Web servers. 
(Prerequisites: minimum six credits in computers in 
education courses and permission of the chair) Cross- 
referenced as CS 467. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 469 Establishing Worldwide Learning 
Communities Through Technology 

Worldwide developments continue to heighten aware- 
ness of the importance of linkages among peoples in 
different nations. When we consider our world from 
such a perspective, the need for understanding and 
education becomes glaringly apparent. Technologically 
connected learning communities around the globe 
occur through students forming partnerships to learn 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



61 



about each others' customs, languages, and cultures; 
teachers collaborating on teaching strategies and 
curriculum development; or administrators and policy- 
makers exchanging views on educational issues. 
Participants in this course examine the instructional 
issues and concerns tor connecting communities of 
learning worldwide along with the related technological 
tools and techniques. To complement classroom 
instruction, students apply course concepts via select 
online assignments. Cross-referenced as CS 469. Lab 
fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 470 Distance Teaching in the Information 
Age 

Distance teaching has become a major teaching and 
training form worldwide. This course examines the 
nature of teaching at a distance, the development of 
distance teaching courses and activities, the role of 
technology in delivering distance teaching, the current 
and potential applications of the Internet in distance 
teaching, and the use of integrated media resources in 
distance teaching. (Prerequisites: MD 400, CS 429, or 
permission of chair) Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 475 Empowering Computers for Best 
Educational Practices 

Society has positioned computers as an integral part of 
the educational process. This course considers the 
development of the computer as an agency for learning, 
the role of computers in today's educational settings, 
and the methods used to improve the functioning 
of computers in learning. Participants study the 
documented computer technology practices and results 
useful in identifying strategic elements that can assist 
in creating best computing practices in a variety of 
educational environments. The course addresses the 
issue of the digital divide and identifies viable strategies 
for assisting schools that lack the necessary hardware, 
software, and staff development plans. Cross- 
referenced as CS 475. Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 490 Achieving an Interdisciplinary Approach 
to Teaching through Technology 

Achieving an interdisciplinary approach to teaching is a 
challenge facing many of today's educators. It is a set 
of complex tasks that involves integrating content 
across disciplines, good instructional design, effective 
planning, and creative pedagogical strategies while at 
the same time realizing educational equity among a 
diverse student population. Fortunately, technologies of 
instruction can help with the realization of these tasks. 
In preparation for the interdisciplinary challenge, teach- 
ers need exceptional instruction in the stages of inter- 
disciplinary curriculum development with technology. 
This course addresses the selection, use, modifica- 
tions, design, integration, and implementation of inter- 
disciplinary curricula using technology in a culturally 
diverse environment. It aims at helping the participants 
in the course to develop their understanding of the 
potential use of technologies of instruction in achieving 
an interdisciplinary cross-cultural approach to educa- 
tion. Cross-referenced as CS 490. Lab fee: $45.00. 
Three credits. 



MD 499 Research in Educational Technology I 

Open to M.A. students. (Prerequisite: 24 credit hours in 
educational technology) Three credits. 

MD 531 Video Production II 

Students examine the picture element in television, 
pictorial composition, visual continuity, lighting, audio, 
video editing, script-writing basics, and production of a 
training/instructional television program. (Prerequisite: 
MD 431) Lab fee: $45. Three credits. 

MD 545 Designing and Developing Training 
Programs 

Designed for prospective training specialists, personnel 
generalists, school media specialists or line personnel 
in business and industry, this course focuses on design- 
ing and developing training programs for administrative 
professionals, management employees, and school 
personnel. Course assignments provide individualiza- 
tion and tailoring of course content to participant 
needs and working environments. Cross-referenced as 
PY 545. Three credits. 

MD 546 Integrating the Arts and Technology into 
the K-8 School Curriculum 

This course demonstrates that music and the arts are 
an integral part of the school curriculum and that they 
can be utilized to promote awareness, acceptance, and 
respect for diverse cultures. Properly conceived, the 
arts constitute a great integrating force if viewed as a 
component of every discipline. New art forms and tech- 
niques of electronic artistic expressions have emerged 
with the advent of the new information age. Teachers 
and school media specialists must develop their aware- 
ness of conventional forms of arts as well as electronic 
formats, their abundant resources, and their potential 
infusion within the K-8 school curriculum. Formerly 
"Integrating the Arts and Technology into the 
Elementary School Curriculum." Cross-referenced as 
ED 546. Three credits. 

MD 581 Directed Observation and Supervised 
Student Teaching in Media 

Under the supervision of the media librarian, partici- 
pants gain experience in the full spectrum of library 
media, including design, implementation, delivery, and 
evaluation of media services. They participate in teach- 
ing and assisting teachers and students with technolo- 
gy applications and uses. Faculty members and the 
cooperating media librarian assist, observe, and evalu- 
ate each student teacher. Six credits. 

MD 582 Student Teaching Seminar 

This seminar focuses on the issues and problems faced 
by student teachers and on the culture and organization 
of the schools. Although much of the seminar's subject 
matter flows from the ongoing student teaching experi- 
ence, it addresses issues such as school governance, 
school and district organizational patterns, classroom 
management, conflict resolution, communication with 
parents, sensitivity to multicultural issues and inclusion, 
as well as the job application process, including resume 
writing, interviewing skills, and developing a profession- 
al portfolio. Three credits. 



62 



Psychology, Special Education, and Educational Technology 



MD 590 Internship in School Media 

This internship provides full-time students with firsthand 
experience in school media management. Credit by 
arrangement. 

MD 591 Internship in Television Production 

Credit by arrangement. 

MD 592 Internship in Multimedia Production 

Credit by arrangement. 

MD 595 Independent Study in Educational 
Technology 

Students complete individual study in educational tech- 
nology with a faculty member after submitting a propos- 
al for independent study prior to registration. Three to 
six credits. 

MD 599 Research in Educational Technology II 

This course is open to C.A.S. students. (Prerequisite: 
21 credits in educational technology courses) Three 
credits. 



TESOL, FOREIGN LANGUAGE, 
AND 

BILINGUAL/MULTICULTURAL 
EDUCATION 



Faculty 

Sr. Julianna Poole, SSND (chair) 



Programs in this department are designed for teachers 
and prospective teachers in the areas of teaching 
English to speakers of other languages and bilingual 
education. Applicants interested in concentrating in 
bilingual education must demonstrate proficiency in 
English and at least one other language in accordance 
with current Connecticut State Department of Education 
regulations. 

Required courses are outlined below. Some courses 
may be substituted at the discretion of the department 
chair 



Requirements for the M.A. 

1 . Complete a minimum of 33 credits 

2. Complete the following required education courses 
(12 credits) 

a. ED 429 Philosophical Foundations of 
Education (NOTE: This is the required 
philosophy course for master's level students. 
Only by explicit exception will a master's 
candidate be permitted to take any other 
course to fulfill the requirement.) 

b. ED 499 Introduction to Educational Research 
(Prerequisite: at least six credits towards 
master's degree) 

c. MD 400 Introduction to Educational 
Technology 

d. ED 512 Contemporary Schooling in Society 
(Prerequisite: at least six credits toward 
master's degree) 

3. Complete 12 credits from the following area of 
concentration-required courses: 

a. Emphasis on TESOL 

i. SL 423 Principles of Bilingualism 
ii. SL 436 Methods and Materials for 

Second Language Teaching 
iii. SL441 Teaching and Learning Within 

Multicultural Contexts of Education 
iv. SL 527 Testing and Assessment in 

Foreign Languages, ESL. and Bilingual 

Programs 



TESOL, Foreign Language, and Bilingual/Multicultural Education 



63 



b. Emphasis on Bilingual/Multicultural Education 
i. SL423 Principles of Bilingualism 
ii. SL 426 Methods and Materials in 
Bilingual Programs OR 
SL 436 Methods and Materials for 
Second Language Teaching 
iii. SL441 Teaching and Learning Within 

Multicultural Contexts of Education 
iv. SL 527 Testing and Assessment in 
Foreign Language, ESL, and Bilingual 
Programs 
4. Complete nine credits selected from program 

offerings with permission of advisor 
5 Complete either a comprehensive examination or 
a master's thesis 

a. Comprehensive examination candidates are 
required to register to take the examination 
after having completed at least 24 credits. 

b. Thesis candidates must meet the following 
requirements: 

i. complete at least 15 but not more than 

30 credits, including ED 499 Introduction 

to Educational Research 
ii. inform their advisors of their decision to 

write the thesis 
iii. obtain instructions for preparing the 

master's thesis from the chair of the 

TESOL, Foreign Language, Bilingual/ 

Multicultural Education Department 
iv. enroll in SL 498 Thesis Seminar, which 

may be selected as an elective with 

department chair approval 
v. receive written approval of the completed 

thesis by the chair of the department 
iv. submit approved thesis to the dean's 

office by appropriate deadline in order to 

fulfill degree requirements 




State Certification 

There are two certification tracks in bilingual education: 
Elementary/Bilingual Endorsement and Secondary/ 
Bilingual Endorsement. To be considered an initial 
certification program completer and/or to receive an 
institutional endorsement when applying for an initial 
educator certification from the Connecticut Department 
of Education, a student must have completed all 
coursework in the planned program as well as all 
PRAXIS and ACTFL assessments as required by the 
state for the intended certification. 

For all initial certifications: Prerequisite completion of a 
minimum of 39 semester hours of credit in general 
academic courses in five of the six following subject 
areas is required: English, natural sciences, mathemat- 
ics, social studies (including a survey course in U.S. 
history), foreign language, and fine arts. 



Requirements for the C.A.S. 

(Please note that we will not be accepting applications 
for the certificate of advanced study in this academic 
year while the program is under review.) 

1 . Complete a minimum of 30 credits 

2. Complete 15 credits from the following required 
courses: 

a. ED 540 Ethics for Educators 

b. SL 527 Testing and Assessment in Foreign 
Language, ESL, and Bilingual Programs 

c. ED 534 Theories of Learning 

d. SL 528 Second Language Curriculum 
Development 

OR 

ED 565 Principles of Curriculum Development 

and Evaluation 

e. SL 590 C.A.S. Practicum in Teaching 

3. Complete 15 credits in area of concentration 
and/or approved program electives. 



Elementary/Bilingual Endorsement 

1 . Hold a bachelor's degree and complete a subject 
area major or an interdisciplinary major 

2. Complete an approved plan of study and 
experience specifically designed to prepare 
elementary school/bilingual education teachers. 
This includes the following: 

a. Content area coursework in bilingual/ 
elementary education 

b. A planned program of professional study that 
includes coursework in each of the following: 
i. Foundations of education 

ii. Educational psychology 

iii. Curriculum and methods of teaching 

iv. Supervised observations, full-time student 

teaching 
v. Special education 



64 



TESOL, Foreign Language, and Bilingual/Multicultural Education 



Secondary/Bilingual Endorsement 

1 . Hold a bachelor's degree and complete a subject 
area major in an approved endorsement 

2. Complete an approved plan of study and 
experience specifically designed to prepare 
secondary school/bilingual education teachers. 
This includes the following: 

a. Content area coursework in bilingual/ 
secondary education 

b. A planned program of professional study that 
includes coursework in each of the following: 

Foundations of education 
i. Educational psychology 
ii. Curriculum and methods of teaching 
iv. Supervised observations, full-time student 

teaching 
v. Special education 

In view of the teacher's role in both school and commu- 
nity, students whose relevant academic productivity is 
marginal or who demonstrate personal qualities that are 
not conducive to the role of teacher will not be recom- 
mended for matriculation or continuation in the teacher 
preparation program, student teaching placement, or 
state certification. In addition, the Disposition Statement 
presented on page 23 is applicable to these programs 
as it is to all programs in the Graduate School of 
Education and Allied Professions. 



Cross Endorsements: 

Bilingual Education 

A minimum of 18 credits, including study in each of the 
following: first and second language acquisition, includ- 
ing language and literacy development; linguistic and 
academic assessment; cross-cultural sensitivity and 
communication, and implications for instruction; strate- 
gies for modifying English content area instruction; 
methods of teaching English as a second language; 
and methods of teaching bilingual education. 

TESOL 

A minimum of 30 credits in TESOL, including study in 
each of the following: English syntax and composition, 
language theory, culture and intergroup relations, lin- 
guistic and academic assessment, and curriculum and 
methods of teaching ESL. 

Testing Requirements for Bilingual Education 

Those who wish to be certified in bilingual education or 
add it as an endorsement must demonstrate proficiency 
in English and the language of the bilingual program. 
The reading and writing components of Praxis I must be 
successfully completed to demonstrate proficiency in 
English. The Oral Proficiency Interview of the American 
Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages 
(ACTFL), in a non-English language of the bilingual pro- 
gram, must be passed at the Intermediate High level or 
higher to demonstrate proficiency. 



TESOL 

1 . Hold a bachelor's degree and complete a subject 
area major 

2. Complete an approved plan of study and 
experience specifically designed to prepare 
TESOL teachers. This includes the following: 

a. 30 credits in TESOL courses 

b. Nine credits in bilingualism, a foreign 
language, or literacy development 

c. A planned program of professional study to be 
distributed across each of the following: 

i. Foundations of education 

ii. Educational psychology 

iii. Curriculum and methods of teaching 

iv. Supervised observations, full-time student 

teaching 
v. Special education 



Course Descriptions 

SL 419 Special Learners in the Bilingual/ESL 
Classroom 

Designed to familiarize bilingual and ESL teachers with 
the developmental learning needs of children and ado- 
lescents who are exceptional, this course examines the 
special learning needs of linguistically and culturally 
diverse children, exploring methods of identifying and 
working effectively with exceptional children and 
adolescents in bilingual or ESL classrooms. Cross- 
referenced as SE 419. Three credits. 

SL 421 Linguistics for Language Teachers 

This course provides language teachers with a basic 
introduction to the principles and methods of linguistic 
theory, with an emphasis on semantics, syntax, 
morphology, and phonology. Additional topics include 
pragmatics and written language. The investigation of 
first and second language acquisition gives language 
teachers an insight into the development of language 
for ELL students. Three credits. 

SL 422 Teaching Grammar in Second Language 
Settings 

Grammar is a necessary component of language pro- 
grams. This course provides foreign/second language 
and bilingual teachers with techniques to facilitate their 



TESOL, Foreign Language, and Bilingual/Multicultural Education 



65 



students' acquisition of grammar, to illustrate effective 
contextualization of grammatical principles, and to 
examine instructional strategies that draw the learner's 
attention to specifically structural regularities. The 
course also analyzes the theoretical considerations of 
second language grammar teaching. Three credits. 

SL423 Principles of Bilingualism 

This foundation course examines research and theories 
underlying bilingualism. Students gain an understand- 
ing of the concepts and issues involved in using the 
principles of bilingualism in educational settings. The 
course also includes an overview of the historical devel- 
opment of bilingual education in the United States and 
other countries and a discussion of major programs and 
social models for bilingual education. Three credits. 

SL 426 Methods and Materials in Bilingual 
Programs 

Designed for elementary and secondary bilingual 
teachers and prospective teachers, this course 
explores methods, techniques, strategies, and instruc- 
tional media relevant to bilingual learners. Participants 
examine a variety of bilingual education program 
models, analyze frequently used methods and materi- 
als, and discuss the adaptation and development of 
effective bilingual instructional materials and assess- 
ment instruments and the implementation of alternative 
methods. Three credits. 

SL 436 Methods and Materials for Second 
Language Teaching 

Designed for foreign and second language teachers 
and prospective teachers, this course explores 
methods, techniques, strategies, and instructional 
media relevant to ESL and foreign language students, 
emphasizing the development and enhancement of 
communicative environments in language classrooms. 
Participants examine a variety of innovative methods 
and discuss the adaptation and development of materi- 
als and assessment instruments. This course meets the 
state requirement for the certificate for teaching English 
to adult speakers of other languages. Three credits. 

SL 441 Teaching and Learning Within 

Multicultural Contexts of Education 

This course explores and addresses the multifaceted 
aspects of multicultural education with the aim of 
engaging in a teaching-learning process where partici- 
pants explore their commitment to the well-being and 
learning of all students; develop a deep understanding 
of the needs of all students; develop strategies to pro- 
mote caring, justice, and equity in teaching; learn to 
respect linguistic, racial, ethnic, gender, and cultural 
diversity; investigate how students construct knowl- 
edge; demonstrate an understanding of the relationship 
between students' daily life experiences and education; 
and critique systematic processes of discrimination that 
marginalize and silence various groups of students. 
Cross-referenced as ED 441. Three credits. 



SL 445 Comprehending and Communicating 
in a Second Language 

Designed for second/foreign language and bilingual 
teachers, this course examines current theory and 
research underlying the acquisition of speaking and lis- 
tening skills in a second language, as well as strategies 
for assessing student performance, evaluating and 
adapting materials, and enhancing communicative 
competence in the classroom. Three credits. 

SL 451 Content Area Instruction in 
Bilingual/ESL Classrooms 
This course examines language and learning in the 
content areas while emphasizing the communicative 
environment of the classroom. Participants explore 
teaching strategies that enable the learner to under- 
stand the discourse of content subjects, to examine 
textbooks and materials that incorporate content-area 
instruction, and to discuss procedures for integrating 
content-area subjects and for assessing student 
progress in content areas. Three credits. 

SL 461 Reading and Writing in a Second 
Language 

Designed for second/foreign language and bilingual 
teachers, this course examines current theory and 
research underlying first- and second-language reading 
and composing processes. Additional topics include 
procedures for understanding and analyzing the prob- 
lems that characterize second language readers and 
writers; strategies for assessing student performance; 
evaluating and adapting materials; and enhancing the 
comprehension and creation of written second lan- 
guage discourse. Three credits. 

SL 475 Sociolinguistics 

This course examines variability in language use 
according to region, race or ethnic background, gender, 
and personality with the goal of developing sensitivity to 
variation in one's own language and that of others, and 
examining language variation using the methods and 
insights of contemporary linguistics. Three credits. 

SL 477 Culture and Second Language 
Acquisition 

Designed for foreign/second language and bilingual 
teachers, this course treats culture and language as 
interdependent phenomena, exploring the basic 
concepts, research, and principles applicable to culture 
and language learning with an emphasis on the 
practical application of these concepts to the language 
classroom. Participants also gain an enhanced 
awareness of their assumptions regarding their own 
and other cultures, and an understanding of how these 
assumptions influence language teaching and learning. 
Three credits. 



66 



TESOL, Foreign Language, and Bilingual/Multicultural Education 



SL 498 Thesis Seminar 

Students who have selected the thesis option for 
completion of the M.A. degree develop their research 
proposals, carry out the research, and complete their 
theses during this seminar. An approved thesis must 
be submitted to fulfill this degree requirement. Three 
credits. 

SL 504 The English Language Learner in the 
Regular Classroom 

Designed to familiarize the mainstream teacher with the 
learning needs of children and adolescents who are 
linguistically and culturally diverse, this course employs 
an overview of second language acquisition theory as 
the framework for discussing ways to meet the needs of 
English language learners. Teachers also learn strate- 
gies for developing and adapting materials for creating 
communicative classroom environments and assessing 
student performance. Three credits. 

SL 520 Foundations of Dual Language 
Instruction 

This course provides a theoretical foundation and 
practical application of dual language instruction to 
teachers of first and second language learners, K-12. 
It presents linguistic, educational, cognitive, socio- 
cultural, and economic benefits of knowing two or more 
languages. It provides practical opportunities to 
implement the instructional process - oral language 
development, teaching literacy and content in two 
languages. The course also focuses on assessment 
procedures and resources. Three credits. 

SL 526 Historical and Sociopolitical Issues in 
Bilingual/Multicultural/ESL Education 

This course, which is conducted as a seminar, provides 
an overview of the historical events and philosophical 
issues underlying bilingual/multicultural education and 
discusses contemporary socio-political controversies 
surrounding bilingual education and ESL instruction. 
Three credits. 

SL 527 Testing and Assessment in Foreign 

Language, ESL, and Bilingual Programs 

Designed for foreign/second language and bilingual 
teachers, this course provides an overview of tech- 
niques for assessing second language and bilingual 
proficiency. Participants evaluate standardized instru- 
ments currently in use; analyze techniques for assess- 
ing factors relevant to second language and bilingual 
proficiency such as I.Q., academic achievement, lan- 
guage aptitude, and competence in reading, writing, 
speaking, and listening; and discuss controversial 
issues affecting language assessment. Three credits. 



SL 528 Second Language Curriculum 
Development 

This course familiarizes foreign/second language and 
bilingual teachers with the theory underlying the devel- 
opment of second language curricula. The course 
emphasizes devising curricula in accordance with the 
needs of learners and presents strategies for analyzing 
needs, developing curricula that focus on communica- 
tion, and evaluating and choosing appropriate materials 
and assessment instruments. Three credits. 

SL 581 Directed Observation and Supervised 
Student Teaching 

This course for students who have been approved as 
qualified candidates for teaching in TESOL or bilingual 
education involves students in observation and teach- 
ing five days a week for one semester. In accordance 
with certification regulations, students spend half of the 
student-teaching period in an elementary setting and 
half in a secondary setting. The course emphasizes 
classroom management dynamics, teaching tech- 
niques, lesson plan organization, and faculty duties. 
Students participate in group seminars and individual 
conferences; the University supervisor(s) and the coop- 
erating teacher(s) assist, observe, and evaluate each 
student. (Prerequisites: formal acceptance into teacher 
preparation program and completion of all certification 
requirements) Six credits. 

SL 582 Student Teaching Seminar 

Students take this weekly seminar concurrently with 
student teaching. The seminar focuses on the issues 
and problems faced by student teachers and on the cul- 
ture and organization of the schools. Although much of 
the seminar's subject matter flows from the ongoing stu- 
dent-teaching experience, it addresses issues such as 
school governance, school and district organizational 
patterns, classroom management, conflict resolution, 
communication with parents, and sensitivity to multicul- 
tural issues and inclusion, as well as the job application 
process, including resume writing, interviewing, and 
developing a professional portfolio. Three credits. 

SL 590 C.A.S. Practicum in Teaching 

Students solve a practical problem in classroom teach- 
ing, applying educational research to a specific 
ESL/bilingual school situation. Three credits. 

SL 595 Independent Study 

Students complete individual study with the written per- 
mission of the department chair, having submitted their 
proposals prior to registration. Three credits. 



Compliance Statements and Notifications 



67 



COMPLIANCE STATEMENTS 
AND NOTIFICATIONS 



Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy 
and Campus Crime Statistics Act 

Fairfield University complies with the Jeanne Clery 
Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus 
Crime Statistics Act. This report contains a summary of 
the Fairfield University Department of Public Safety poli- 
cies and procedures along with crime statistics as 
required. A copy of this report may be obtained at the 
Department of Public Safety in Loyola Hall, Room 2, by 
calling the department at (203) 254-4090, or by visiting 
the Fairfield University Public Safety website. The Office 
of Public Safety is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a 
year. 

Fairfield University is a drug-free campus and work- 
place. 

Catalog 

This catalog pertains only to the graduate programs 
offered through the Graduate School of Education and 
Allied Professions (GSEAP). It is useful as a source of 
continuing reference and should be saved by the stu- 
dent. The provisions of this bulletin are not an irrevoca- 
ble contract between Fairfield University and the stu- 
dent. The University reserves the right to change any 
provision or any requirement at any time. 

Non-Discrimination Statement 

Fairfield University admits students of any sex, race, 
color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, age, 
national origin or ancestry, disability or handicap to all 
the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally 
accorded or made available to students of the 
University. It does not discriminate on the basis of sex, 
race, color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, 
age, national origin or ancestry, disability or handicap in 
administration of its educational policies, admissions 
policies, employment policies, scholarship and loan pro- 
grams, athletic programs, or other University-adminis- 
tered programs. Inquiries about Fairfield's non-discrimi- 
nation policies may be directed to the Dean of Students, 
(203)254-4000, ext. 4211. 

Notification of Rights Under FERPA 

Fairfield University complies with the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (also known 
as the Buckley Amendment), which defines the rights 
and protects the privacy of students with regard to their 
educational records. A listing of records maintained, 
their location, and the means of reviewing them is avail- 
able in the Office of the Dean of Students. 

The rights afforded to students with respect to their edu- 
cation records under FERPA are: 

1 . The right to inspect and review the student's educa- 
tion records within 45 days of the day the University 



receives a request for access. Students should sub- 
mit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic 
department, or other appropriate official, written 
requests that identify the record(s) they wish to 
inspect. The University official will make arrange- 
ments for access and notify the student of the time 
and place where the records may be inspected. If 
the records are not maintained by the University offi- 
cial to whom the request was submitted, that official 
shall advise the student of the correct official to 
whom the request should be addressed. 

2. The right to request the amendment of the student's 
education records that the student believes are 
inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the 
University to amend a record that they believe is 
inaccurate or misleading. They should write to the 
University official responsible for the record, clearly 
identify the part of the record they want changed, 
and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the 
University decides not to amend the record as 
requested by the student, the University will notify 
the student of the decision and advise the student of 
his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for 
amendment. Additional information regarding the 
hearing procedures will be provided to the student 
when notified of the right to a hearing. 

3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally 
identifiable information contained in the student's 
education records, except to the extent that FERPA 
authorizes disclosure without consent. One excep- 
tion that permits disclosure without consent is dis- 
closure to school officials with legitimate education- 
al interests. A school official is a person employed 
by the University in an administrative, supervisory, 
academic or research, or support staff position 
(including law enforcement unit personnel and 
health staff); a person or company with whom the 
University has contracted (such as an attorney, 
auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the 
Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official 
committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance com- 
mittee, or assisting another school official in per- 
forming his or her tasks. A school official has a legit- 
imate educational interest if the official needs to 
review an education record in order to fulfill his or 
her professional responsibility. 

4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. 
Department of Education concerning alleged fail- 
ures by Fairfield University to comply with the 
requirements of FERPA. The name and address of 
the Office that administers FERPA are: 

Family Policy Compliance Office 
U.S. Department of Education 
600 Independence Avenue, SW 
Washington, DC 20202-4605 

Title II Report 

The Title II Higher Education Reauthorization Act 
Report is available online at 
www.fairfield.edu/x3071 .xml. 



68 



Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid 



TUITION, FEES, 

AND FINANCIAL AID 



Tkiition and Fees 

The schedule of tuition and fees for the academic year 
2006-07 follows: 

Application for matriculation 

(not refundable) $55 

Registration per semester $25 

Tuition per credit $475 

Audit fee (per three-credit course) . . . $682.50 

Change course fee $10 

Computer lab fee $45 

Student teaching, practicum, 

and internship fees (each) $25 

Materials fee $15 - $50 

Commencement fee 

(required of all degree recipients) $150 

Transcript fee $4 

Promissory note fee $25 

Returned check fee $30 

The University's Trustees reserve the right to change 
tuition rates and the fee schedule and to make addi- 
tional changes whenever they believe it necessary. 

Full payment of tuition and fees, and authorization for 
billing a company must accompany registration. 
Payments may be made in the form of cash (in person 
only), check, money order, credit card (MasterCard, 
VISA, or American Express), or online payment at 
www.fairfield.edu/tuition. All checks are payable to 
Fairfield University. 

Degrees will not be conferred and transcripts will not be 
issued until students have met all financial obligations to 
the University. 



Deferred Payment 

During the fall and spring semesters, eligible students 
may defer payment on tuition as follows: 

1 . For students taking fewer than six credits: At regis- 
tration, the student pays one-half of the total tuition 
due plus all fees and signs a promissory note for the 
remaining tuition balance. The promissory note pay- 
ment due date varies according to each semester. 

2. For students taking six credits or more: At registra- 
tion, the student pays one-fourth of the total tuition 
due plus all fees and signs a promissory note to pay 



the remaining balance in three consecutive monthly 
installments. The promissory note payment due 
dates vary according to the semester. 

Failure to honor the terms of the promissory note will 
prevent future deferred payments and affect future reg- 
istrations. 



Reimbursement by Employer 

Many corporations pay their employees' tuition. 
Students should check with their employers. If they are 
eligible for company reimbursement, students must 
submit, at in-person registration, a letter on company 
letterhead acknowledging approval of the course 
registration and explaining the terms of payment. The 
terms of this letter, upon approval of the Bursar, will 
be accepted as a reason for deferring that portion of 
tuition covered by the reimbursement. Even if covered 
by reimbursement, all fees (registration, processing, 
lab, or material) are payable at the time of registration. 

Students will be required to sign a promissory note, 
which requires a $25 processing fee, acknowledging 
that any outstanding balance must be paid in full prior to 
registration for future semesters. A guarantee that 
payment will be made must be secured at the time of 
registration with a MasterCard, VISA, or American 
Express credit card. If the company offers less than 
100-percent unconditional reimbursement, the student 
must pay the difference at the time of registration and 
sign a promissory note for the balance. Letters can only 
be accepted on a per-semester basis. Failure to pay 
before the next registration period will prevent future 
deferred payments and affect future registration. 



Refund of T\iition 

All requests for tuition refunds must be submitted to the 
appropriate dean's office immediately after withdrawal 
from class. Fees are not refundable. The request must 
be in writing and all refunds will be made based on the 
date notice is received or, if mailed, on the postmarked 
date according to the following schedule. Refunds of 
tuition charged on a MasterCard, VISA, or American 
Express must be applied as a credit to your charge card 
account. 

14-15 Meeting Courses 

Before first scheduled class 100 percent 

Before second scheduled class 90 percent 

Before third scheduled class 80 percent 

Before fourth scheduled class 60 percent 

Before fifth scheduled class 40 percent 

Before sixth scheduled class 20 percent 

After sixth scheduled class No refund 



Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid 



69 



10-12 Meeting Courses 

Before first scheduled class 100 percent 

Before second scheduled class 80 percent 

Before third scheduled class 60 percent 

Before fourth scheduled class 40 percent 

Before fifth scheduled class 20 percent 

After fifth scheduled class No refund 

6-8 Meeting Schedule 

Before first scheduled class 100 percent 

Before second scheduled class 60 percent 

Before third scheduled class 30 percent 

After third scheduled class No refund 

4-5 Meeting Schedule 

Before first scheduled class 100 percent 

Before second scheduled class 50 percent 

After second scheduled class No refund 

Refunds take two to three weeks to process. 



Financial Aid 

Assistantships 

A limited number of part- and full-time University assist- 
antships are available to assist promising and deserving 
students. Assistantships are awarded for a semester 
only and students must reapply each semester for 
renewal of an assistantship award. Renewal of an 
award is based on academic performance and previous 
service performance, and is at the discretion of the 
dean. 

A graduate assistant will be appointed to a curriculum 
area or to the dean's office and assigned duties as 
determined by the dean and the faculty responsible for 
the curriculum area. The assistantships normally cover 
all tuition charges up to a maximum of 12 credits. In 
return for the assistantship, the student must work a 
maximum of 20 hours per week under the direction of 
the department chair or program director. In addition, 
the Disposition Statement presented on page 17 is 
applicable to this student position as it is to all students 
in the Graduate School of Education and Allied 
Professions. 

There are also assistantships available in other 
University departments. A list of known assistantships is 
available in the dean's office. Applications are available 
in the dean's office and must be submitted to the dean 
by May 1 for the fall semester and Dec. 1 for the spring 



semester. Summer assistantships are generally avail- 
able for the Marriage and Family Therapy program only. 



Alumni Scholarships 

The Elementary Education Scholarship 

Due to the generosity of an anonymous alumnus, 
this needs-based award supports up to nine credits 
per semester for underrepresented candidates who 
are preparing for elementary educator certification. 
An eligible candidate may receive full or partial tuition 
support during multiple semesters. Contact Dr. Patricia 
Calderwood, the elementary education program direc- 
tor, for specifics. 

Dr. Thomas A. O'Meara '65, MA '67 Memorial 
Scholarship 

Beginning in academic 2005-2006, it was Dr. Thomas 
O'Meara's intent that over a 20-year period one 
graduate secondary English education student 
annually would be awarded a partial tuition scholarship 
for his or her student teaching course. The recipient 
will be selected based on recommendations from 
the program faculty. Please contact Dr. Emily Smith, 
coordinator for graduate secondary education student, 
for more information. 



Federal Stafford Loans 

Under this program, graduate students may apply for 
up to $18,500 per academic year, depending on their 
educational costs. Students demonstrating need (based 
on federal guidelines) may receive up to $8,500 of their 
annual Stafford Loan on a subsidized basis. Any 
amount of the first $8,500 for which the student has not 
demonstrated need (as well as the remaining $10,000 
should they borrow the maximum loan), would be bor- 
rowed on an unsubsidized basis. 

When a loan is subsidized, the federal government 
pays the interest for the borrower as long as he or she 
remains enrolled on at least a half-time basis and for 
a six-month grace period following graduation or 
withdrawal. When a loan is unsubsidized, the student is 
responsible for the interest and may pay the interest on 
a monthly basis or opt to have the interest capitalized 
and added to the principal. 

How to Apply 

To apply for a Federal Stafford loan, apply online at: 

www.opennet.salliemae.com 

Click on "Loan Applicant" and follow the instructions 
on how to set up your account online and apply for a 
Federal Stafford online with Sallie Mae. 

After successfully applying for your Federal Stafford 
loan online, you can electronically sign (E-sign) the loan 
online. However, if you do not want to use E-Sign, you 
can still print out the MPN, sign it, and mail it directly to 
Sallie Mae at the address they list on the MPN. 



70 



Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid 



"Stafford Loan Borrowers must have a current FAFSA 
form on file and have completed Entrance Counseling 
via www.mapping-your-future.org before your loan 
can disburse. To apply online for the FAFSA go to: 
www.fafsa.ed.gov (Fairfield's school code is 001385). 

If you have any questions, please call the Financial Aid 
Office at (203) 254-4125. 

Approved loans will be disbursed in two installments. 
Students borrowing from Sallie Mae lenders will have 
their funds electronically disbursed to their University 
accounts. Students who borrow from other lenders will 
need to sign their loan checks in the Bursar's Office 
before the funds can be applied to their accounts. 
Receipt of financial aid requires full matriculation in a 
degree program. 



Sallie Mae Signature Loan Program 

These loans help graduate and professional students 
pay the cost of attending the University. Repayment 
begins approximately six months after you leave school 
with interest rates ranging from Prime -0.5% to Prime 
+ 2.0% depending on credit worthiness and having/ 
not having a co-borrower. Students may borrow from 
$500 to the Cost of Attendance less financial aid. 
For information contact Signature Customer Service at 
1-800-695-3317 or www.salliemae.com/signature. 



Tax Deductions 

Treasury regulation (1.162.5) permits an income tax 
deduction for educational expenses (registration fees 
and the cost of travel, meals, and lodging) undertaken 
to: maintain or improve skills required in one's employ- 
ment or other trade or business; or meet express 
requirements of an employer or a law imposed as a con- 
dition to retention of employment job status or rate of 
compensation. 



Veterans 

Veterans may apply educational benefits to degree 
studies pursued at Fairfield University. Veterans should 
submit their file numbers at the time of registration. The 
University Registrar's office will complete and submit 
the certification form. 



Graduate School Administration and Faculty 



71 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF EDUCATION AND 
ALLIED PROFESSIONS 
ADMINISTRATION 



Susan D. Franzosa, Ph.D. 

Dean and Professor of Education 

Karen L. Creecy, M.A. 

Associate Dean and Certification Officer 



DEPARTMENT CHAIRS 



Virginia A. Kelly, Ph.D. 

Counselor Education 

Wendy Kohli, Ph.D 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Rona Preli, Ph.D. 

Marriage and Family Therapy 

Daniel Geller, Ph.D. 

Psychology, Special Education, and Educational 
Technology 

Sr. Julianna Poole, SSND, Ed.D. 

TESOL, Foreign Language, and Bilingual/Multicultural 
Education 



FACULTY 



Marsha Alibrandi 

Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction 

B.A., Boston University 

M. Ed., Ed.D., University of Massachusetts 

Sandra Billings 

Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction 

B.S.. Boston College 

M.S., Central Connecticut State University 

Sixth Year Certificate, Southern Connecticut State 

University 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 



Patricia E. Calderwood 

Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction 
B.S., Fordham University 

M.S.Ed., Lehman College, City University of New York 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Faith-Anne Dohm 

Associate Professor of Psychology and Special Education 

B.S., Christopher Newport College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland Baltimore County 

Michele Friedman 

Visiting Lecturer of Counselor Education 
B.A., University of Massachusetts, Amherst 
M.S., Northeastern University 

Daniel Geller 

Professor of Psychology and Special Education 
B.A., C.W. Post College 
Ph.D., Yeshiva University 

Jennifer S. Goldberg 

Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction 
B.A., Purdue University 
M.S., Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies 
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

Ingeborg Haug 

Associate Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy 

Education 

B.A. equivalent, Padagogische Hochschule Reutlingen, 

Germany 

M.A., M.Div. equivalent, Universitat Tubingen, Germany 

D.Min., Andover Newton Theological School, Department 

of Psychology and Clinical Studies 

Virginia Ann Kelly 

Associate Professor of Counselor Education 
B.S., State University of New York, Geneseo 
M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Greensboro 

Wendy R. Kohli 

Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction 
B.S., M.S., State University of New York, Cortland 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Elizabeth Langran 

Assistant Professor of Educational Technology 

B.S., Villanova University 

M.A., Trinity College, Washington 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Paula Gill Lopez 

Associate Professor of Psychology and Special Education 

B.A., California State University 

M.A.. Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Bogusia Molina 

Associate Professor of Counselor Education 
B.S., M.S.Ed.. Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 



72 



Graduate School Administration and Faculty 




Julianna Poole, SSND 

Assistant Professor of TESOL, Foreign Language, and 

Bilingual/Multicultural Education 

B.A., College of the Sacred Heart 

M.A., Seton Hall University 

M.Ed., University of Puerto Rico 

Ed.D., University of Rochester 

Rona Preli 

Associate Professor of Marriage and 

Family Therapy Education 

B.S., University of Connecticut 

M.S., University of Pennsylvania 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Tracey Robert 

Assistant Professor of Counselor Education 
B.A., Dunbarton College of the Holy Cross 
M.A., Fairfield University 
Ph.D., Mississippi State University 

Christine S. Siegel 

Assistant Professor of School Psychology 
B.S., M.A., Marist College 
C.A.S., Ph.D., SUNY, Albany 

Emily R. Smith 

Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction 
B.A., Swarthmore College 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

David Aloyzy Zera 

Associate Professor of Psychology and Special Education 
B.S., Southern Connecticut State University 
M.A., C.A.S., Fairfield University 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 



LECTURERS IN EDUCATION 

Harry Adamakos 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Union College 

M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University 

Philip Bennett 

Lecturer In Education 

B.A., Rutgers University 

M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Lance Berndlmaier 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., M.A., C.A.S. Fairfield University 

Deborah K. Boccanfuso 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S.. Southern Connecticut State University 

M.A.. C.A.S., Fairfield University 

Christopher D. Brown 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Fairfield University 

M.S., Sixth Year Certificate, Southern Connecticut State 

University 

Mary M. Campbell 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., University of Louisville 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania 
Ed.D., George Washington University 

Guadalupe Dauplaise 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., College of New Rochelle 

M.A., University of Virginia, Charlottesville 

S.Y.C., University of Bridgeport 

MaryAnn DeFelice 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Elms College 

M.A., C.A.S. , Fairfield University 

Barbara R. Dennis 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., M.A., University of Bridgeport 

C.A.S., Fairfield University 

John E. Desrochers 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Union College 

M.S., M.Phil., M.Ed., Ph.D., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 

Eva de Lourdes Diaz-Edwards 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico 

M.A., Ph.D.. University of Connecticut 

Dawn DiGiovanna 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., University of Connecticut, Storrs 

M.A.. C.A.S., Fairfield University 



Barbara A. Fischetti 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., M.S., City College, New York 

D. Ed., Pennsylvania State University 



Graduate School Administration and Faculty 

Gregory Hugh Marshall 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., University of Connecticut 

M.A., C.A.S., Fairfield University 



73 



Faith-Anne Dohm 

Associate Professor of Psychology and Special Education 

B.S., Christopher Newport College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland Baltimore County 

Daniel French 

Lecturer in Education 
B.S., St. Lawrence University 
M.A., Boston College 
Ph.D., Hofstra University 

Faye Gage 

Director, Connecticut Writing Project at Fairfield University 
Lecturer in Education 
B.A., Connecticut College 
M.A.T., Yale University 
C.A.S., Fairfield University 

Jean Gaumer 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Louisiana State University 

M.S.. Western Connecticut State University 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 

Oneita Haynes-Alarcon 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., Boston College 
M.A., C.A.S., Fairfield University 

Maureen Ann Hinkley 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S, Charter Oak College 

M.S., MBA, Fairfield University 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 

John J. Horrigan 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., University of Maryland 

M.S., Southern Connecticut State University 

William Kaplan 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Lake Forest College 

M.A., Portland State University 

S.Y.C., Southern Connecticut State University 

A. Stephen Lanza 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Richard Madwid 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., M.S., Western Connecticut State University 

W. Paul Maloney 

Lecturer in Education 

Paul Maloney & Associates Management Consultants 

B.A., Holy Cross 

M.A., Boston State University 

Ed.D., University of Virginia 



Brian Merry 

Lecturer in Education 

Television Operations Supervisor, Fairfield University 

B.S., Sacred Heart University 

M.A., Fairfield University 

Leonard Miller 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., M.S., S.Y.C., University of Bridgeport 

Judith Nessel 

Lecturer in Education 
B.S.Ed., Adelphi University 
M.A., St. Johns University 
C.A.S., Fairfield University 

Thanos Patelis 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., College of the Holy Cross 

M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Denise Parent 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., Manhattanville College 
M.A., Fairfield University 

Fred Rapczynski 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., Fairfield University 
M.A., Montclair State College 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Edia Reyes 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico 

M.S., S.Y.C., Ph.D. University of Connecticut 

Joseph A. Ricciotti 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., State University of New York 

M.A., Sixth Year Certificate, Ed.D., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 

Judith B. Soto 

Lecturer in Education 

M.A., Allegheny College 

M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

M.A., Fairfield University 

Renee E. Strainge 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State University 

M.A., Fairfield University 

M.S., Southern Connecticut State University 

Cynthia Swift 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Long Island University 

M.A., Hunter College 

Ph.D. Candidate. Walden University 



74 



Graduate School Administration and Faculty 



Christine B. Walker 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., University of Connecticut 

M.A., Antioch New England Graduate School 

Dawn Walker 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., University of Connecticut 

M.A., C.A.S., Fairfield University 

Valerie M. Washington 

Lecturer In Education 

B.A., M.S., Hunter College, CUNY 

Ed.D. University of Massachusetts 

Karen S. Wiles 

Lecturer in Education 

B.S., SUNY, Buffalo 

M.A., California State University, San Francisco 

Lynn Winslow 

Lecturer in Education 
B.S.. Washington University 
M.A.T., Sacred Heart University 

Claudia Wolen 

Lecturer in Education 

B.A., Hofstra University 

M.A., Fairfield University 

M.A., Bank Street College of Education 

Jill Zaloski 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A., LaGrange College 
M.Ed.. West Georgia College 



Faculty Emeriti 

Marguerite R. Carroll 1966-1988 

Professor of Education. Emerita 



Rosalie M. Colman 1978-1988 

Associate Professor of Education, Emerita 

Anthony Costa 1964-1999 

Assistant Professor of Education. Emeritus 

Robert Dubroff 1966-1988 

Associate Professor of Education. Emeritus 

Ibrahim M. Hefzallah 1968-2005 

Professor of Educational Technology, Emeritus 

Jerome J. Schiller 1966-1997 

Professor of Psychology and Special Education. Emeritus 

John J. Schurdak 1966-1997 

Associate Professor of Education. Emeritus 

Martin A. Stader 1967-1999 

Associate Professor of Education, Emeritus 

Alexander Tolor 1965-1989 

Professor of Psychology and Education, Emeritus 



Advisory Boards 



75 



ADVISORY BOARDS 



ADVISORY BOARD IN 
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

Michelle Frank 

Elementary Teacher and Alumna 
Bryant Elementary School, Bridgeport 

Faye Gage 

Adjunct Faculty and Director of the 
Connecticut Writing Project 
Fairfield University 

Jack Kioichi Hasegawa 

Bureau Chief, Office of Educational Equity 
Connecticut State Department of Education 

John Honey 

Cooperating Science Teacher and Alumus 
Fairfield Ludlow High School 

Larry Leverett 

Superintendent 
Greenwich Public Schools 

Mayra Medina 

Numeracy Coach 

Bryant Elementary School, Bridgeport 

Elizabeth Olbrych 

English Teacher and Alumna 
Staples High School, Westport 

Judy Primavera 

Professor and Bridgeport Community Outreach 
Psychology Department 
Fairfield University 

John Ramos Sr. 

Superintendent 
Bridgeport Public Schools 

John Reynolds 

Principal 

Jefferson School, Norwalk 

Kathy Sochacki 

District Facilitator 
Bridgeport Public Schools 

Joan Weiss 

Professor and Secondary Education Liaison 
College of Arts and Sciences, Math Department 
Fairfield University 



ADVISORY BOARD IN 
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

John J. Horrigan 

School Librarian 

Coleytown Middle School, Westport 

Rev. Jim Mayzik, S.J. 

Director, Media Center 
Fairfield University 

W. Paul Maloney 

Paul Maloney Associates 



ADVISORY BOARD IN 
COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

Cynthia Swift 

Multicultural Relations 
Fairfield University 

Richard Madwid 

Counselor Education Department 
Fairfield University 

Judith Nessel 

Fairfield Public Schools (retired) 

Robert Schmidt 

Guidance Counselor 
Madison School 
Trumbull Public School 

Tara Blackwell 

Career Counselor and Internship Coordinator 
SUNY, Purchase 

Susan Unger 

Director of Guidance 
Milford Public Schools 

Dawn Leeds 

Guidance Counselor 

Brein McMahon High School 

Norwalk Public Schools 

Tomy Aprame 

Family Sen/ices Woodfield 
Bridgeport 

Gretchen Tosh 

Community Counseling Student Representative 

Laura Spannaus 

School Counseling Student Representative 



76 



Advisory Boards 



ADVISORY BOARD IN 
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY 

Donna Andrade 

National Director of Diversity 
Director of Student Support Services 
Fairfield Preparatory School 

Paul Esposito 

Executive Director 
Huntington Counseling Center 

Chuck Berke 

Executive Director 

Fairfield Community Services 

Rev. David Spollet 

First Church Congregational 
Fairfield 

Gwen Workman 

Alumna Representative 



ADVISORY BOARD IN 

PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 



Eileen Montgomery 

School Psychologist 
Fairfield Public Schools 

Michael Myers 

Director of Student Support Services 
Stamford Public Schools 



ADVISORY BOARD IN 

TESOL, FOREIGN LANGUAGE, AND 

BILINGUAL/MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Migdalia Bisch 

Assistant Director 
Bilingual Education Services 
Bridgeport Public Schools 

Augusto Gomes 

K-12 Program Coordinator 
ESLVBilingual Education Program 
Danbury Public Schools 

Lupe Dauplaise 

ELL Program Coordinator 
Stamford Public Schools 



Sister Carol Ann 

Principal 

Villa Maria Educational Center 



Ivette Matias 

Bilingual Education/ESOL/World Languages Administrator 

Norwalk Public Schools 



David Abby 

Superintendent 

New Canaan Public Schools 



Fernando Tiago 

Supervisor of Bilingual and Compensatory Programs 

Meriden Public Schools 



Robert Chiappetta 

Interim Director, Special Education 
Norwalk Public Schools 

Brian Farrell 

Coordinator of Psychological Services 
Wolcott Public Schools 

Barbara Fischetti 

School Psychologist 

Director of Psychological Services, K-8 

Westport Public Schools 

Wendy Gaynor 

Director of Special Education 
Derby Public Schools 

Robert Greenwood 

Supervisor of Special Education 
Stratford Public Schools 

Beatrice Krawiecki 

Assistant Supervisor of Special Education 
Norwalk Public Schools 



Carol LaBruno 

Special Education Department Head 
Stamford Public Schools 



77 



FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 

ADMINISTRATION 

2006-07 



Jeffrey von Arx, S.J., Ph.D. 

President 

Charles H. Allen, S.J., M.A. 

Executive Assistant to the President 
James M. Bowler, S.J., M.A. 

Facilitator of Jesuit and Catholic Mission 
and Identity 

Orin L. Grossman, Ph.D. 

Academic Vice President 

Mary Frances A.H. Malone, Ph.D. 

Associate Academic Vice President 
Judith Dobai, M.A. 

Associate Vice President for Enrollment 

Management 
Georgia F. Day, Ph.D. 

Assistant Academic Vice President, 

TRIO Programs 
Timothy L. Snyder, Ph.D. 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
Norman A. Solomon, Ph.D. 

Dean, Charles F. Dolan School of Business 
Susan Douglas Franzosa, Ph.D. 

Dean, Graduate School of Education 

and Allied Professions 
Edna F. Wilson, Ed.D. 

Dean, University College 
Evangeios Hadjimichael, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Engineering 
Jeanne M. Novotny, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Nursing 
Debnam Chapped, Ph.D. 

Dean of Freshmen 
Robert C. Russo, M.A. 

University Registrar 

William J. Lucas, MBA 

Vice President for Finance and Administration and 

Treasurer 

Michael S. Maccarone, M.S. 

Associate Vice President for Finance 
Richard I. Taylor, B.S., C.E. 

Associate Vice President for Campus 

Planning and Operations 
Mark J. Guglielmoni, M.A. 

Director of Human Resources 
Kenneth R. Fontaine, MBA 

Controller 



Fairfield University Administration 

James A. Estrada, M.A., M.L.I.S. 

Vice President for Information Services and 
University Librarian 



Mark C. Reed '96, MBA, M.Ed. 

Vice President for Student Affairs 
Thomas C. Pellegrino '90, Ph.D., J.D. 

Dean of Students 
Michael J. Doody, S.J. 

Director of Campus Ministry 
Eugene P. Doris, M.A.T. 

Director of Athletics 

Fredric C. Wheeler, M.P.A 

Acting Vice President for University Advancement 
Martha Milcarek, B.S. 

Assistant Vice President for 

Public Relations 



Administrators Emeriti 



Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J., Ph.D. 

1979-2004 
President Emeritus 

John A. Barone, Ph.D. 

1950-1992 

Professor of Chemistry and Provost, Emeritus 

Barbara D. Bryan, M.S. 

1965-1996 

University Librarian, Emerita 

Henry J. Murphy, S.J. 

1959-1997 

Dean of Freshmen, Emeritus 

Phyllis E. Porter, MSN 

1970-1989 

Associate Professor of Nursing, Emerita 

Dean, School of Nursing, Emerita 



78 



Fairfield University Board of Trustees 



FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Nancy A. Altobello '80 

Rev. John F. Baldovin, S.J. 

Rev. Terrence A. Baum, S.J. 

Joseph F. Berardino 72 

Ronald F. Carapezzi '81 

Kevin M. Conlisk '66 

E. Gerald Corrigan, Ph.D., '63 

Sheila K. Davidson '83 

Joseph A. DiMenna Jr. '80 

Charles F. Dolan, P'86,'85 

William P. Egan '67, P'99 

Thomas A. Franko '69 

Rev. Michael J. Garanzini, S.J. 

Rev. Edward Glynn, S.J. 

Rev. Otto H. Hentz, S.J. 

Brian P. Hull '80 

Paul J. Huston '82 (Chairman of the Board) 

Patricia Hutton '85 

John R. Joyce 

Rev. James F. Keenan, S.J. 

Jack L. Kelly '67, P'96 

Ned C. Lautenbach 

Stephen M. Lessing 76 

Clinton A. Lewis Jr. '88 

Thomas P. Loughlin '80 

Roger M. Lynch '63, P'95 

Michele Macauda 78 

William A. Malloy '80 

Michael E. McGuinness '82 

John C. Meditz 70 

ElnerL Morrell '81, P'03 

Most. Rev. George V. Murry, S.J. 

Christopher C. Quick 79 

Lawrence C. Rafferty '64 

Rosellen Schnurr 74, P'04 

Sandi Simon, P'01 

Rev. Jeffrey P. von Arx, S.J. 

William P. Weil '68 




Trustees Emeriti 

Alphonsus J. Donahue 
Rev. Aloysius P. Kelley, S.J. 
Francis J. McNamara Jr. 



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Fairfield 

UNIVERSITY 

Jesuit. Personal. Powerful. 



1073 North Benson Road 

Fairfield, CT 06824-5195 

Phone: (203) 254-4184 

Toll-free: (888) 488-6840 

Fax: (203) 254-4073 

email: gradadmis@mail.fairfield.edu 

www.fairfield.edu